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Tropical Storm Isaias Drops Heavy Rain on Puerto Rico

Tropical Storm Isaias dropped heavy rain on Puerto Rico on Thursday.  At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Isaias was located at latitude 17.6°N and longitude 68.5°w which put it about 105 miles (165 km) east- southeast of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.  The center was about 80 miles (130 km) south of Cabo Engano.  Isaias was moving toward the northwest at 20 m.p.h. (32 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1003 mb.

Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for Puerto Rico, Culebra, Vieques, the U.S. Virgin Islands, the British Virgin Islands,  the entire coast of the Dominican Republic, Le Mole St. Nicholas, Haiti to the northern border with the Dominican Republic, the Turks and Caicos, the Acklins, Crooked Island, Long Cay, the Inaguas, Mayaguana, the Ragged Islands, Cat Island, the Exumas, Long Island, Rum Cay and San Salvador.  Tropical Storm Watches were in effect for Andros Island, New Providence, Eleuthera, the Abacos, the Berry Islands, Grand Bahama Island and Bimini.

Bands on the eastern side of Tropical Storm Isaias were dropping heavy rain over parts of Puerto Rico on Thursday morning.  Flash Flood Warnings were in effect for parts of the island.  Isaias was also causing winds to tropical storm force in parts in Puerto Rico.  A station at Yabucoa Tanque de Agua reported a sustained wind speed of 46 m.p.h. (74 km/h) and a wind gust to 56 m.p.h. (91 km/h).  A station at Las Mareas reported a sustained wind speed of 3 m.p.h. (69 km/h) and a wind gust of 54 m.p.h. (87 km/h).

The circulation around Tropical Storm Isaias exhibited much more organization on Thursday morning, although the mid-level center did appear to be displaced to the north of the low level center.  There was a center of circulation but the distribution of thunderstorms was asymmetrical.  Most of the stronger thunderstorms were occurring in bands in the eastern side of Tropical Storm Isaias.  Storms near the center of circulation were generating upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the tropical storm.  Bands in the western half of Isaias consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.  Northerly winds on that side of the circulation were sinking over the southern part  of Hispaniola and that could have been suppressing the development of thunderstorms in that region.  The circulation around Tropical Storm Isaias was very still very large.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 415 miles (665 km) on the northern side of Isaias.

Tropical Storm Isaias could weaken when the low level center of circulation moves across the eastern part of the Dominican Republic.  The low level circulation will be disrupted by the terrain but it looks like Isaias will pass east of the tallest mountains on Hispaniola.  The mid-level center of Tropical Storm Isaias appears to be passing very close to the eastern end of Hispaniola.  The middle and upper portions of the circulation are likely to remain intact and a new low level circulation could form north of Hispaniola.  Tropical Storm Isaias will move through an environment favorable for intensification once it moves past Hispaniola.  Isaias will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Tropical Storm Isaias is likely to intensify when it moves north of Hispaniola and it could intensify rapidly once a new low level center of circulation develops.

Tropical Storm Isaias will move around the western end of a subtropical high pressure system over the North Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer Isaias toward the northwest during the next 48 hours.  it will turn the tropical storm more toward the north on the weekend when Isaias reaches the western end of the high pressure system.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Isaias will move across the eastern part of the Dominican Republic today.  Isaias will move over the Bahamas on Friday and it could approach southeast Florida on Saturday.  Tropical Storm Isaias will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to Puerto Rico, Hispaniola and the Bahamas.  Flash floods could occur.

Tropical Storm Isaias Develops South of Puerto Rico

Tropical Storm Isaias developed south of Puerto Rico on Wednesday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Isaias was located at latitude 15.8°N and longitude 67.0°W which put it about 155 miles (250 km) south of Ponce, Puerto Rico.  Isaias was moving toward the west-northwest at 20 m.p.h. (32 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1004 mb.

Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for Puerto Rico, Culebra, Vieques, the U.S. Virgin Islands, the British Virgin Islands, St. Martin, St. Barthelemy, Saba, St. Eustatius, St. Maarten, the entire coast of the Dominican Republic, Le Mole St. Nicholas, Haiti to the northern border with the Dominican Republic, the Turks and Caicos, the Acklins, Crooked Island, Long Cay, the Inaguas, Mayaguana, the Ragged Islands, Cat Island, the Exumas, Long Island, Rum Cay and San Salvador.  Tropical Storm Watches were in effect for Andros Island, New Providence, Eleuthera, the Abacos, the Berry Islands, Grand Bahama Island and Bimini.

Data from a scatterometer onboard a satellite and observations from a buoy south of Puerto Rico indicated that a distinct center of circulation formed within a large low pressure system over the northeastern Caribbean Sea and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Storm Isaias.  The center of circulation formed about 150 miles (240 km) south of Puerto Rico on Wednesday night.  More thunderstorms were developing near the newly formed center.  Many of those thunderstorms were southeast of the center.  Storms near the center were generating upper level divergence which pumped mass away from the tropical storm.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were also located on the northern periphery  of the circulation and the strongest winds were occurring in those bands.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 300 miles (485 km) to the northeast of the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force also extended out 130 miles (215 km) to the northwest of the center.  The winds south of the center of Isaias were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Isaias will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 12 hours.  Isaias will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Tropical Storm Isaias will get better organized and strengthen during the first half of Thursday.  A portion of the circulation around Isaias will move over Hispaniola later on Thursday.  Mountains on that island will disrupt the circulation and Tropical Storm Isaias will weaken while the center moves over land.

Tropical Storm Isaias will move around the western end of a subtropical high pressure system over the North Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer Isaias toward the west-northwest on Thursday.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Isaias will move across Hispaniola on Thursday.  Isaias will cause gusty winds and it will drop locally heavy rain when it moves over Hispaniola.  Heavy rain could cause flash floods.

Potential Tropical Storm Prompts Warnings for Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, Leeward Islands

A low pressure system that has the potential to organize into a tropical storm prompted the issuance of Tropical Storm Warnings for Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and many of the Leeward Islands on Tuesday morning.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Potential Tropical Cyclone Nine was located at latitude 13.8°N and longitude 53.7°W which put it about 585 miles (940 km) east-southeast of the Leeward Islands.  It was moving toward the west at 23 m.p.h. (37 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1007 mb.

Tropical Storm Warnings were issued for Puerto Rico, Culebra, Vieques, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Antigua, Barbuda, the British Virgin Islands, Montserrat, St. Kitts, Nevis, Guadeloupe, Martinique, St. Martin, Saba, St. Eustatius, and St. Maarten.

The circulation around Potential Tropical Cyclone Nine was very broad and it stretched from the southwest toward the northeast.  The stronger thunderstorms were occurring in the southwestern and northeastern ends of the circulation.  There were few thunderstorms or bands in the broad middle of the low pressure system.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 200 miles (320 km) on the northern side of the circulation.  The winds in the southern half of the low pressure system were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Potential Tropical Cyclone Nine will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next two days.  It will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  It will move through an area where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  The large broad circulation will contribute to a slow, gradual intensification.  If thunderstorms consolidate around a center of circulation and an inner core begins to form, then the system may be designated as a tropical storm.

Potential Tropical Cyclone Nine will move south of a subtropical high pressure system over the North Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer the potential tropical storm toward the west-northwest during the next several days.  On its anticipated track Potential Tropical Cyclone Nine could approach the Leeward Islands on Wednesday morning.  It could approach the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico by Wednesday night.  The large circulation means that Potential Tropical Nine will bring a prolonged period of gusty winds.  It could also drop heavy rain and cause flash floods on some islands.

Tropical Storm Douglas Moves Away from Hawaii

A weakening Tropical Storm Douglas moved away from Hawaii on Monday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Storm Douglas was located at latitude 22.9°N and longitude 163.3°W which put it about 200 miles (325 km) east-southeast of French Frigate Shoals.  Douglas was moving toward the west at 18 m.p.h. (30 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 70 m.p.h. (110 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 993 mb.

Tropical Storm Douglas weakened on Monday.  An upper level trough west of Hawaii produced southerly winds which blew toward the top of Douglas’ circulation.  Those winds caused strong vertical wind shear.  The wind shear caused former Hurricane Douglas to weaken even though it was moving over water where the Sea Surface Temperature was near 27°C.  The low level center of circulation was surrounded by showers and lower clouds.  The only thunderstorms were occurring on the northern periphery of the tropical storm.  Bands in the other parts of Douglas consisted of showers and lower clouds.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 100 miles (160 km) from the center of circulation.

Tropical Storm Douglas will move south of a subtropical high pressure system over the North Pacific Ocean.  The high will steer Douglas toward the west during the next few days.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Douglas will move across the International Date Line and over the Western North Pacific Ocean later this week.  The upper level trough will continue to cause vertical wind shear and Douglas will continue to weaken.

Hurricane Douglas Passes Just North of Hawaii

Hurricane Douglas was passing just to the north of the Hawaiian Islands on Sunday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday night the center of Hurricane Douglas was located at latitude 22.0°N and longitude 157.3°W which put it about 60 miles (95 km) northeast of Honolulu, Hawaii.  Douglas was moving toward the west-northwest at 16 m.p.h. (26 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 989 mb.

Hurricane Warnings were in effect for Oahu, Kauai and Niihau.

The core of Hurricane Douglas exhibited greater organization on Sunday night.  Thunderstorms around the eye at the center of Douglas grew taller as the hurricane moved over warmer water.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core.  Winds to hurricane force extended out about 40 miles (65 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 115 miles (185 km) from the center in the northern half of Hurricane Douglas.  Winds to tropical storm force only extended out about 50 miles (80 km) on the southern side of the circulation.  The stronger winds were remaining north of the Hawaiian Islands.  There were reports of localized minor wind damage on some of the islands.

Hurricane Douglas will move around the south side of a subtropical high pressure system over the North Pacific Ocean.  The high will steer Douglas toward the west-northwest during the next several days.  On its anticipated track the core of Hurricane Douglas will pass north of Oahu.  Scattered minor wind damage could occur on Oahu, Kauai and Niihau.  The southern part of the eyewall could come closer to Kauai and the risk for wind damage is greater there.  Winds blowing uphill could enhance rainfall on Oahu, Kauai and Niihau.  Flash Flood Watches were in effect for those islands.

Hanna’s Heavy Rain Causes Flash Floods in South Texas

Heavy rain dropped by Hurricane Hanna caused flash floods in South Texas on Sunday.  Radar estimates of the rainfall indicated that 10-15 inches (3 to 5 meters) of rain fell on parts of Lower Rio Grande Valley during the passage of former Hurricane Hanna.  A weather station in McAllen, Texas measured 8.24 inches (209 mm) of rain.  Flash Flood Warnings were in effect for West Central Cameron County, Southern Hidalgo, Southwest Jim Hogg County, and Central Zapata County.  The Arroyo Colorado in Harlingen, Texas rose from 5.2 feet (1.6 meters) to 20.72 feet (6.3 meters) and it was still rising.

Rain was still falling over parts of the Lower Rio Grande Valley even though the center of former Hurricane Hanna had moved over northeastern Mexico.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Tropical Depression Hanna was located at latitude 25.6°N and longitude 100.6°W which put it about 35 miles (55 km) west-southwest of Monterrey, Mexico.  Hanna was moving toward the west-southwest at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb.

Hurricane Hanna Makes Landfall on Padre Island

The center of Hurricane Hanna officially made landfall on Padre Island 15 miles (25 km) north of Port Mansfield, Texas at 6:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday.  At 6:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Hurricane Hanna was located at latitude 26.8°N and longitude 97.4°W which put it 15 miles (25 km) north of Port Mansfield, Texas.  Hanna was moving toward the west-southwest at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 90 m.p.h. (150 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 110 m.p.h. (175 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 973 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Port Mansfield to Port Aransas, Texas.  Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the portions of the coast from Barra el Mezquital, Mexico to Port Mansfield and from Port Aransas to Port O’Connor, Texas.

Hurricane Hanna strengthened during Saturday and the maximum sustained wind speed at the time of landfall was 90 m.p.h. (150 km/h).  The minimum pressure decreased to 973 mb during the day.  A circular eye with a diameter of 35 miles (55 km) developed at the center of circulation.  Winds to hurricane force extended out 30 miles (50 km) from the center of Hanna.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 90 miles from the center of circulation.  A storm surge of up to 6 feet (2 meters) was occurring along the coast of Texas north of where the center made landfall.  There were reports of minor wind damage in Port Mansfield.

Hurricane Hanna will move south of a strengthening high pressure system over the southern U.S.  The high will steer Hanna toward the west-southwest during the next two days.  On its anticipated track the core of Hurricane Hanna will pass north of Brownsville, McAllen and Harlingen, Texas.  The center of Hanna will pass near Monterrey, Mexico on Sunday.  Hurricane Hanna will weaken gradually while it moves inland.  Hanna will drop heavy rain over South Texas and northeast Mexico.  Flash floods will likely occur in parts of the Lower Rio Grande Valley.

Hurricane Douglas Prompts Hurricane Warning for Oahu

The approach of Hurricane Douglas prompted the issuance of a Hurricane Warning for Oahu on Saturday afternoon.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Hurricane Douglas was located at latitude 19.5°N and 150.1°W which put it about 325 miles (525 km) east of Hilo, Hawaii.  Douglas was moving toward the west-northwest at 18 m.p.h. (30 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 90 m.p.h. (150 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 110 m.p.h. (175 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 984 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for Oahu.  Hurricane Watches were in effect for Hawaii, Maui, Lanai, Molokai and Kahoolawe.  Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for Hawaii, Maui, Lanai, Molokai and Kahoolawe.  Tropical Storm Watches were in effect for Kauai and Niihau.

Hurricane Douglas weakened gradually on Saturday as it moved over cooler water.  Douglas was moving over water where the Sea Surface Temperature was near 25°C.  As a result of the cooler water, thunderstorms did not grow as high in the atmosphere.  There was still an eye at the center of circulation, but breaks began to appear in the ring of storms around the eye.  Most of the stronger thunderstorms were in the northern half of the circulation.  Bands in the southern half of the circulation consisted mainly of showers and lower clouds.   Winds to hurricane force extended out about 30 miles (50 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 110 miles (175 km) from the center.

Hurricane Douglas will move around the southern side of a subtropical high pressure system over the North Pacific Ocean.  The high will steer Douglas toward the west-northwest during the next several days.  On its anticipated track Hurricane Douglas will pass north of the Big Island of Hawaii on Sunday morning.  The core of Douglas could pass near Oahu on Sunday night.

Hurricane Douglas will bring gusty winds to the Hawaiian Islands.  The strongest winds could occur on Oahu.  Winds speeds will be greater at higher elevations.  Douglas could drop heavy rain on the sides of the islands where the wind blows up the slopes.  Flash flooding will be possible.

Hanna Strengthens to a Hurricane Near South Texas

Former Tropical Storm Hanna strengthened into a hurricane near the coast of South Texas on Saturday morning.  At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Hurricane Hanna was located at latitude 27.1°N and longitude 96.0°W which put it about 100 miles (160 km) east-southeast of Corpus Christi, Texas.  Hanna was moving toward the west at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (150 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 982 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Port Mansfield to Mesquite Bay, Texas.  Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the portions of the coast from Barra de Mezquital, Mexico to Port Mansfield and from Mesquite Bay to High Island, Texas.

A NOAA aircraft detected winds to hurricane force in former Tropical Storm Hanna on Saturday morning and the National Hurricane Center upgraded Hanna to a hurricane.  The circulation around Hurricane Hanna was well organized.  A circular eye with a diameter of 25 miles (40 km) was at the center of circulation.  The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hanna.  Storms near the core were generating upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the hurricane.  Winds to hurricane force extended out 25 miles (40 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 90 miles (150 km) from the center.

Hurricane Hanna will move through an environment favorable for strengthening during the next few hours.  Hanna will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Hurricane Hanna will continue to intensify until it makes landfall on the coast of South Texas.

Hurricane Hanna will move south of a high pressure system that stretches across the southern U.S.  The high will steer Hanna a little to the south of due west.  On its anticipated track the center of Hurricane Hanna will make landfall on Padre Island later today.  The northern part of the eyewall will pass near Corpus Christi and that city could experience winds to hurricane force.  The southern part of the eyewall will pass near Port Mansfield which could also experience hurricane force winds.  The core of Hanna will pass north of Brownsville, but Brownsville, Harlingen and Mcallen could all experience winds to tropical storm force.

Easterly winds will blow water toward the coast of South Texas and they will cause a significant storm surge.  The storm surge could reach 6 to 9 feet (2 to 3 meters) near and just to the north of where the center makes landfall.  Hurricane Hanna will also drop heavy rain over South Texas.  Isolated locations could receive over a foot (0.3 meters) of rain and flash flooding is likely.

Elsewhere, Tropical Storm Gonazalo was quickly nearing Trinidad.  At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Saturday  the center of Tropical Storm Gonzalo was located at latitude 10.3°N and longitude 59.8°W which put it about 100 miles (160 km) east of Trinidad.  Gonzalo was moving toward the west at 18 m.p.h. (30 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1009 mb.

Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect  for Tobago and Grenada.

Tropical Storm Hanna Prompts Hurricane Warning for Texas

A strengthening Tropical Storm Hanna prompted the issuance of a Hurricane Warning for a portion of the coast of Texas on Friday afternoon.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Hanna was located at latitude 27.3°N and longitude 94.3°W which put it about 195 miles (310 km) east of Corpus Christi, Texas.  Hanna was moving toward the west at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 999 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the Texas coast from Baffin Bay to Mesquite Bay.  Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the portions of the coast from the Mouth of the Rio Grande River to Baffin Bay and from Mesquite Bay to San Luis Pass, Texas.

Tropical Storm Hanna exhibited much more organization on Friday afternoon.  A primary rainband wrapped around the southern and eastern sides of the center of Hanna.  The northern end of the rainband appeared to be wrapping around the rest of the center of circulation and an eye seemed to be forming.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the center of Tropical Storm Hanna.  Storms near the center were generating upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the tropical storm.  The removal of mass was allowing the surface pressure to decrease.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 60 miles (95 km) from the center for circulation.

Tropical Storm Hanna will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 18 hours.  Hanna will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Tropical Storm Hanna will continue to intensify.  If an eye and eyewall form completely, then Hanna could strengthen rapidly during the 6 to 12 hours prior to landfall.  Tropical Storm Hanna is very likely to intensify into a hurricane.

Tropical Storm Hanna will move south of a high pressure system that stretches across the southern U.S.  The high will steer Hanna toward the west during the next 24 hours.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Hanna will reach the coast of Texas near Corpus Christi during the middle of the day on Saturday.

Tropical Storm Hanna is very likely to be a hurricane when it makes landfall.  It will bring strong winds to the portion of the coast near where the eye makes landfall.  Strong winds blowing water toward the coast could create a storm surge of 6 to 8 feet (2 to 3 meters) near and to the north of where the eye makes landfall.

Elsewhere, a trade wind surge hit Tropical Storm Gonzalo from the northeast.  The surge caused increased low level wind shear and it brought drier air.  The increased shear and drier air caused Gonzalo to weaken.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Gonzalo was located at latitude 10.0°N and 55.6°W which put it about 390 miles (625 km) east of the southern Windward Islands.  Gonzalo was moving toward the west at 18 m.p.h. (30 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km.h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1008 mb.

Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for Barbados, Tobago, Grenada, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines.