Category Archives: Eastern and Central Pacific

TCs between Mexico and Hawaii

Tropical Storm Lorena Brings Rain to Northwestern Mexico

Tropical Storm Lorena brought rain to parts of northwestern Mexico on Saturday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday was located at latitude 27.6°N and longitude 111.2°W which put it about 35 miles (55 km/h) southwest of Guaymas, Mexico.  Lorena was moving toward the north at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gust to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb.  A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Huatabampito to Puerto Libertad, Mexico.

Former Hurricane Lorena weakened on Saturday as it moved northward across the Gulf of California.  The inner core of Lorena was disrupted on Saturday morning when the eye moved near the southern tip of Baja California.  An upper level trough over the southwestern U.S. produced strong southwesterly winds which caused moderate vertical wind shear.  The wind shear inhibited the development of new thunderstorms while Tropical Storm Lorena moved over the warm water in the Gulf of California.  By Saturday night the strongest thunderstorms were occurring just to the northeast of the center circulation.

Tropical Storm Lorena will make landfall on the west coast of Mexico near Guaymas on Saturday night.  Lorena will move northward over Sonora toward Hermosillo after it make landfall.  Tropical Storm Lorena is a small storm and it will weaken rapidly when it moves inland.  Lorena will drop locally heavy rain over parts of Sonora.  The locally heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations.

Hurricane Lorena Near Cabo San Lucas

Hurricane Lorena moved near Cabo San Lucas, Mexico on Friday afternoon.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Hurricane Lorena was located at latitude 23.2°N and longitude 109.3°W which put it about 45 miles (75 km) northeast of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico.  Lorena was nearly stationary.  The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 987 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from La Paz to Puerto Cortes, Mexico.  A Hurricane Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from La Paz to Santa Rosalia.  Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect from Puerto Cortes to Cabo San Lazaro and from La Paz to Santa Rosalia.  Tropical Storm Watches were in effect from Topolobampo to Guaymas and from Cabo San Lazaro to Puerto San Andresito.

The circulation around Hurricane Lorena strengthened quickly when it reached the very warm water at the southern end of the Gulf of Calfiornia.  A small circular eye developed at the center of circulation.  The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the compact inner core of Hurricane Lorena.  Winds to hurricane force extended out 15 miles (25 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 45 miles (75 km) from the center.

The future intensity of Hurricane Lorena will depend entirely on its track.  If Hurricane Lorena moves over Baja California, it will weaken quickly when it moves over the mountains.  However, if the small circulation around Lorena remains over the very warm water in the Gulf of California, then the hurricane could strengthen further.  The numerical models have been trending toward keeping Hurricane Lorena over water for a longer period of time, but the center of the hurricane is very close to the southern end of Baja California.

Hurricane Lorena moved into a region where the steering currents are weak, which is why Lorena is nearly stationary.  The southern end of a trough over the western U.S. will try to steer Hurricane Lorena toward the north-northeast.  However, mountains in Baja California sometimes block westerly winds in the lower levels.  A slightly larger circulation around Tropical Storm Mario could pull Hurricane Lorena toward the west.  The future track of Hurricane Lorena is highly uncertain.  Hurricane Lorena could move over Baja California or it could move farther north into the Gulf of California.

The center of Tropical Storm Mario was located at latitude 18.0°N and longitude 110.0°W which put it about 340 miles (545 km) south of the southern tip of Baja California.  Mario was moving toward the north at 3 m.p.h. (5 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 992 mb.  The future of Tropical Storm Mario will depend on how much its circulation interacts with the circulation around Hurricane Lorena.  Mario is currently about 350 miles (565 km) south of Hurricane Lorena.

Tropical Storm Lorena Moves Toward Baja California

Tropical Storm Lorena moved toward Baja California on Thursday night after brushing the west coast of Mexico earlier in the day.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Lorena was located at latitude 22.3°N and longitude 107.7°W which put it about 145 miles (235 km) east-southeast of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico.  Lorena was moving toward the northwest at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 70 m.p.h. (110 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 994 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from La Paz to Puerto Cortes, Mexico.  A Hurricane Watch was in effect from La Paz to San Evaristo, Mexico.  Tropical Storm Watches were in effect from San Evaristo to Loreto and from Puerto Cortes to Puerto San Evaristo.

When the center of former Hurricane Lorena passed near the west coast of Mexico, the eastern part of the circulation passes over mountains.  The mountains disrupted the flow of air and some drier air was pulled into the hurricane.  The disruption and drier air weakened the inner core of the circulation and caused Lorena to weaken to a tropical storm.  The inner core was beginning to redevelop on Thursday evening.  More thunderstorms were forming near the center of circulation and other thunderstorms were occurring in bands in the eastern half of the circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 70 miles (110 km) from the center of circulation.

Tropical Storm Lorena will move through an environment favorable for intensification on Friday.  Lorena will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Tropical Storm Lorena is likely to strengthen back into a hurricane on Friday.

Tropical Storm Lorena will move around the western part of a ridge of high pressure over Mexico.  The ridge will steer Lorena toward the northwest.  The circulation of Tropical Storm Lorena will interact with the circulation of Tropical Storm Mario which is southwest of Lorena.  It looked like Lorena was pulling Mario toward the northeast on Thursday night.  However, it is possible that Mario could tug Lorena more toward the west on Friday.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Lorena will approach the southern tip of Baja California on Friday afternoon.  Lorena is likely to be a hurricane at that time.

Elsewhere over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean, Tropical Storm Mario was southwest of Lorena and Tropical Storm Kiko was between Baja California and Hawaii.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT the center of Tropical Storm Mario was located at latitude 17.6°N and longitude 110.2°W which put it about 265 miles (590 km) south of the southern tip of Baja California.  Mario was moving toward the northeast at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h (130 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 995 mb.

At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Kiko was located at latitude 16.6°N and longitude 129.6°W which put it about 1350 miles (2175 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.  Kiko was moving toward the northwest at 6 m.p.h. (10 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb.

Lorena Strengthens to a Hurricane Near Manzanillo

Former Tropical Storm Lorena strengthened to a hurricane near Manzanillo, Mexico on Wednesday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDY on Wednesday the center of Hurricane Lorena was located at latitude 18.7°N and longitude 104.7°W which put it 35 miles (55 km) southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico.  Lorena was moving toward the northwest at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 990 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Punta San Telmo to Cabo Corrientes, Mexico.  A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the coast from Cabo Corrientes to Punta Mita, Mexico.

The circulation around Hurricane Lorena exhibited more organization on Wednesday night.  Some satellite images suggested that a small eye might be forming at the center of circulation.  Lorena was a small hurricane.  Winds to hurricane force extended out about 20 miles (30 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 90 miles (145 km) from the center.

Hurricane Lorena will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next several days.  Lorena will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are not too strong and there is not likely to be a lot of vertical wind shear.  However, the center of Hurricane Lorena will move very close to the coast of Mexico.  Small hurricanes often draw drier air over the land into their circulations when they move close to the west coast of Mexico.  If Hurricane Lorena draws in drier air, it will weaken even though the rest of the environment is favorable for intensification.  If the center of Lorena moves farther away from the coast, then the hurricane could strengthen.

Hurricane Lorena will move around the western side of a ridge over Mexico.  The ridge will steer Lorena toward the northwest during the next several days.  On its anticipated track, Hurricane Lorena will pass very close to the west coast of Mexico on Thursday.  Hurricane Lorena could drop locally heavy rain and flash floods could occur.  If Hurricane Lorena doesn’t weaken near the coast, it could approach the southern tip of Baja California on Friday.

Elsewhere over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean, Tropical Storms Kiko and Mario strengthened on Wednesday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Kiko was located at latitude 15.8°N and longitude 127.8°W which put it about 1265 miles (2035 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.  Kiko was moving toward the west at 6 m.p.h. (10 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 998 mb.

At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Mario was located at latitude 15.4°N and longitude 112.2°W which put it about 540 miles 9870 km) south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.  Mario was moving toward the northwest at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 998 mb.

Tropical Storm Lorena Forms, Watch Issued for Mexico

Tropical Storm Lorena formed south of Mexico on Tuesday and a Tropical Storm Watch was issued for a portion of the coast.  At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Storm Lorena was located at latitude 13.9°N and longitude 100.4°W which put it about 275 miles (440 km) south-southeast of Zihuatanejo, Mexico.  Lorena was moving toward the northwest at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1004 mb.

A Tropical Storm Watch was issued for the portion of the coast from Zihuatanejo to Cabo Corrientes, Mexico.

A distinct low level center of circulation formed in a cluster of thunderstorms south of Mexico on Tuesday and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Storm Lorena.  The circulation around Lorena was still organizing.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were curling around the western side of the center of circulation.  Bands in the eastern half of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.  An upper level ridge over Mexico was producing northeasterly winds which were blowing toward the top of the circulation.  Those winds were causing moderate vertical wind shear and they may have been the reason why the bands were stronger in the western half of  Tropical Storm Lorena.

Tropical Storm Lorena will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next several days.  Lorena will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  The upper level ridge will continue to cause some vertical wind shear, which will inhibit intensification.  The shear is likely to slow the rate at which Tropical Storm Lorena intensifies.  Lorena could move near the west coast of Mexico.  If the center moves near the coast, then the circulation could draw some drier air into the tropical storm.  The drier would likely cause Tropical Storm Lorena to weaken.  If the center of Lorena remains west of the coast of Mexico, then it could strengthen into a hurricane later this week.

A ridge over Mexico will steer Tropical Storm Lorena toward the northwest during the next few days.  On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Storm Lorena could be near the west coast of Mexico by Wednesday night.  That is the reason the government of Mexico issued a Tropical Storm Watch for that portion of the coast.  Lorena could approach Baja California in four or five days.

Elsewhere over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean, Hurricane Kiko was weakening slowly well east of Hawaii and Tropical Depression Fourteen-E developed south of Baja California.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Hurricane Kiko was located at latitude 17.0°N and longitude 125.0°W which put it about 1060 miles (1705 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.  Kiko was moving toward the west-southwest at 5 m.p.h. (8 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 987 mb.

At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Depression Fourteen-E was located at latitude 11.9°N and longitude 108.2°W which put it about 720 miles (1235 km) south of the southern tip of Baja California.  it was moving toward the north-northwest at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1008 mb.

Hurricane Kiko Strengthens to Cat. 4

Hurricane Kiko strengthened to Category 4 on the Saffir-Simpson Scale on Sunday.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Hurricane Kiko was located at latitude 17.0°N and longitude 121.1°W which put it about 835 miles (1340 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.  Kiko was moving toward the west at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 130 m.p.h. (215 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 160 m.p.h. (260 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 950 mb.

The circulation around Hurricane Kiko remained well organized.  A circular eye with a diameter of 24 miles (39 km) was at the center of Kiko.  The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hurricane Kiko.  Kiko remained a small hurricane.  Winds to hurricane force extended out about 25 miles (40 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 70 miles (110 km).

Hurricane Kiko will move through an environment capable of supporting a major hurricane for another day or two.  Kiko move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  It will move through a region where the winds are blowing from the east at all levels and there is little vertical wind shear.  Sinking motion on the south side of a subtropical high pressure system north of Kiko could transport some drier air toward the hurricane.  Hurricane Kiko could be near its peak intensity, but it is likely to remain a powerful hurricane for several more days.

The subtropical ridge over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean will steer Hurricane Kiko toward the west during the next several days.  On its anticipated track Kiko will move away from Baja California and in the general direction of Hawaii.

Kiko Rapidly Intensifies Into Hurricane Southwest of Baja California

Former Tropical Storm Kiko rapidly intensified into a hurricane southwest of Baja California on Saturday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Hurricane Kiko was located at latitude 17.1°N and longitude 119.3°W which put it about 730 miles (1175 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.  Kiko was moving toward the west at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 985 mb.

The circulation around Hurricane Kiko strengthened rapidly on Saturday.  A circular eye with a diameter of 24 miles (39 km) developed at the center of Kiko.  The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hurricane Kiko.  Storms near the core were generating upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the hurricane.  The circulation around Kiko was small, but symmetrical.  Winds to hurricane force extended out about 20 miles (30 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 70 miles (110 km) from the center.

Hurricane Kiko will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next day or two.  Kiko will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  It will move through a region where the winds at all levels are blowing from the east.  So, there will little vertical wind shear.  Hurricane Kiko is will intensify further and it could strengthen into a major hurricane.

Hurricane Kiko will move south of a subtropical ridge over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean.  The ridge will steer Kiko toward the west.  On its anticipated track Hurricane Kiko will move away from Baja California and toward Hawaii.

Tropical Storm Kiko Forms South of Baja California

Tropical Storm Kiko formed south of Baja California on Thursday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Kiko was located at latitude 16.1°N and longitude 112.2°W which put it about 495 miles (795 km) south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.  Kiko was moving toward the west-northwest at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1004 mb.

A distinct center of circulation developed in a cluster of thunderstorms south of Baja California on Thursday and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Storm Kiko.  The circulation around Kiko was still organizing.  The center of circulation was evident on satellite imagery.  Band of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the center.  Storms near the center of circulation were beginning to generate upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the tropical storm.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 80 miles (130 km) from the center of circulation.

Tropical Storm Kiko will move through an environment favorable for intensification.  Kiko will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Tropical Cyclone Kiko is likely to strengthen into a hurricane.  Kiko could intensify more rapidly once an eye and eyewall form in the inner core of the tropical storm.

Tropical Cyclone Kiko will move south of a subtropical ridge over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean.  The ridge will steer Kiko toward the west-northwest during the next few days.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Kiko will move farther away from Baja California.

Tropical Storm Akoni Develops Southeast of Hawaii

Tropical Storm Akoni developed southeast of Hawaii on Thursday.  At 7:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Akoni was located at latitude 12.2°N and longitude 144.8°W which put it about 855 miles (1380 km) southeast of Hilo, Hawaii.  Akoni was moving toward the west at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1003 mb.

More thunderstorms developed near an area of low pressure southeast of Hawaii on Thursday and the Central Pacific Hurricane Center designated it as Tropical Storm Akoni when satellites indicated there were winds to tropical storm force.  The circulation around Tropical Storm Akoni was still organizing.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were forming.  The strongest rainbands were in the southern half of the circulation.  Bands in the northern half of the circulation were not as strong.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 70 miles (110 km) from the center of circulation.

Tropical Storm Akoni will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next several days.  Akoni will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  It will move southeast of an upper level trough northeast of Hawaii.  The trough will produce southwesterly winds which will cause some vertical wind shear, but the shear will not be strong enough to prevent intensification.  Tropical Storm Akoni is forecast to strengthen gradually during the next several days.

Tropical Storm Akoni will move south of a subtropical high pressure system over the eastern and central Pacific Ocean.  The high will steer Akoni toward the west-northwest.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Akoni will be south of Hawaii on Sunday.

Elsewhere, Hurricane Juliette was weakening slowly southwest of Baja California.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Hurricane Juliette was located at latitude 21.3°N and 120.8°W which put it about 870 miles (1380 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.  Juliette was moving toward the northwest at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 980 mb.

Juliette Rapidly Intensifies Into a Major Hurricane

Hurricane Juliette rapidly intensified into a major hurricane southwest of Baja California on Monday. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Hurricane Juliette was located at latitude 17.8°N and longitude 114.0°W which put it abou 440 miles (710 km) southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.  Juliette was moving toward the northwest at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 115 m.p.h. (185 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 140 m.p.h. (220 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 963 mb.

Hurricane Juliette intensified rapidly on Monday as it moved through an environment of warm water and littler vertical wind shear.  An eye developed at the center of circulation.  The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Bands of strong thunderstorms increased in the eastern half of the circulation.  Bands in the western half of the circulation contained fewer thunderstorms.  Storms around the core of Juliette generated strong upper level divergence which pumped mass away from the hurricane.  Winds to hurricane force extended out about 20 miles (30 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 125 miles (200 km) from the center.

Hurricane Juliette will remain in an environment favorable for intensification for another day or so.  Juliette will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are not too strong and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Hurricane Juliette could strengthen further on Tuesday.  Juliette will move over cooler water later this week and it will start to weaken.

Hurricane Juliette will move southwest of a ridge over the southwestern U.S.  The ridge will steer Juliette toward the northwest.  On its anticipated track Hurricane Juliette will remain well west of Baja California.