Category Archives: Eastern and Central Pacific

TCs between Mexico and Hawaii

Tropical Storm Selma Makes Landfall in El Salvador

Tropical Storm Selma made landfall in El Salvador on Saturday morning.  Selma weakened to a tropical depression after it moved inland.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Depression Selma was located at latitude 13.7°N and longitude 88.5°W which put it about 45 miles (75 km) east of San Salvador, El Salvador.  Selma was moving toward the northeast at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1006 mb.

The coastal warnings and watches for El Salvador and Honduras have been discontinued.

Tropical Depression Selma will continue to weaken as it moves farther inland.  The higher mountains will disrupt the circulation in the lower levels, but the circulation in the middle and upper levels could persist longer.  Tropical Depression Selma will drop locally heavy rain over El Salvador, western Honduras and eastern Guatemala.  The heavy rain could produce flash floods and mudslides.

Tropical Storm Selma Forms South of El Salvador

Tropical Storm Selma formed south of El Salvador on Friday morning.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Selma was located at latitude 11.1°N and longitude 89.5°W which put it about 180 miles (290 km) south of San Salvador, El Salvador.  Selma was moving toward the northwest at 5 m.p.h. (8 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1005 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning has been issued for the entire coast of El Salvador.  A Tropical Storm Watch has been issued for the entire Pacific Coast of Guatemala.

A distinct low level center of circulation formed in a larger area of thunderstorms south of El Salvador on Friday morning and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Storm Selma.  The circulation of Tropical Storm Selma is very asymmetrical.  Most of the showers and thunderstorms are located in the western half of the circulation.  There are bands of showers in the eastern half of the circulation.  An upper level ridge centered over the Yucatan Peninsula is producing easterly winds which are blowing over the top of the circulation.  Those winds are causing moderate vertical wind shear which is the primary reason for the asymmetrical structure of the circulation.  Selma is a small tropical storm.  Winds to tropical storm force only extend out about 45 miles (75 km) from the center of circulation.

Tropical Storm Selma will be moving through an environment that is neutral for intensification.  Selma will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  The upper level ridge will continue to cause moderate vertical wind shear.  The shear will inhibit further intensification.  If the upper level winds weaken, then some intensification may be possible.  However, if the upper level winds get stronger, then Selma could weaken to a tropical depression.

A large counterclockwise circulation centered over Nicaragua and Honduras is steering Tropical Storm Selma slowly toward the northwest and the general motion is expected to continue on Friday.  The upper level ridge over the Yucatan Peninsula will weaken on Saturday and that will allow Tropical Storm Selma to move more toward the north.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Selma will make landfall on the coast of El Salvador or Guatemala on Saturday.

Tropical Storm Selma will bring some gusty winds to the coast.  However, locally heavy rain and flash floods will be the primary risks associated with Tropical Storm Selma when it makes landfall.

Tropical Storm Ramon Forms South of Mexico

Tropical Storm Ramon formed south of Mexico on Wednesday morning.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Ramon was located at latitude 14.9°N and longitude 96.5°W which put it about 55 miles (90 km) south of Puerto Angel, Mexico.  Ramon was moving toward the west-northwest at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb.

The government of Mexico has issued a Tropical Storm Watch that is in effect for the portion of the coast from Puerto Angel to Acapulco.

The circulation of Tropical Storm Ramon is not well organized.  The distribution of thunderstorms is asymmetrical.  Most of the showers and thunderstorms are occurring in the western half of the circulation.  A large upper level ridge centered over the Western Gulf of Mexico is producing easterly winds which are blowing toward the top of the circulation.  Those winds are generating significant vertical wind shear and the shear is probably the reason for the asymmetrical distribution of thunderstorms.

Tropical Storm Ramon will move through an environment that will be mostly unfavorable for intensification.  Ramon will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  So, there is enough energy in the upper ocean to support intensification.  However, the upper level ridge will continue to cause significant vertical wind shear, which will inhibit strengthening.  In addition Tropical Storm Ramon will move close to the coast of Mexico and interaction with land will further inhibit intensification.  If Tropical Storm Ramon survives the strong shear until it moves farther away from Mexico, then it might strengthen.  If Ramon moves closer to the coast or inland, then it is likely to weaken quickly.

Tropical Storm Ramon is moving south of a ridge which is steering it toward the west-northwest and that motion is expected to continue for the next day or two.  On its anticipated track, the center of Tropical Storm Ramon could pass very close to the coast of Mexico, which is why the Tropical Storm Watch was issued.  Even if the center of Ramon remains south of the coast, the northern part of the circulation could produce locally heavy rain and the potential for flash floods exists.

Tropical Storm Pilar Forms Near Mexico

Tropical Storm Pilar formed just west of Mexico on Saturday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Pilar was located at latitude 18.7°N and longitude 105.3°W which put it about 120 miles (195 km) south-southeast of Cabo Corrientes, Mexico.  Pilar was moving toward the north at 5 m.p.h. (8 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1003 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was issued for the portion of the coast from Manzanillo to El Roblito including the Islas Marias.

A distinct center of circulation developed within a larger area of low pressure near the west coast of Mexico on Saturday and the system was classified as Tropical Storm Pilar.  Several bands of showers and thunderstorms began to form around the center.  Storms near the center started to generate upper level divergence which was pumping mass away to the west of Tropical Storm Pilar.

Tropical Storm Pilar will move through an environment that will be somewhat favorable for intensification on Sunday.  Pilar will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.   An upper level high over Mexico is producing easterly winds which are blowing toward the top of the circulation.  Those winds are producing some vertical wind shear, but the shear was not strong enough to prevent the formation of Tropical Storm Pilar.  The eastern part of the circulation will be moving over western Mexico and increased friction will be the primary factor inhibiting strengthening.  Tropical Storm Pilar is likely to intensify on Sunday.

A ridge in the middle levels of the atmosphere over Mexico is steering Tropical Storm Pilar slowly toward the north.  On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Storm Pilar will be very near Cabo Corrientes on Sunday night.  The center could move inland or it could remain just west of the coast.  Tropical Storm Pilar will drop very heavy rain over parts of the states of Colima and Jalisco.  The heavy rain could cause flash flooding in some locations.

Tropical Storm Norma Drifts Near Baja California, Otis Rapidly Intensifies to Cat. 2 Hurricane

Tropical Storm Norma drifted near Baja California on Sunday, while Hurricane Otis rapidly strengthened into a Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale.  At 8:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Tropical Storm Norma was located at latitude 21.3°N and longitude 111.2°W which put it about 140 miles (220 km) south-southwest of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico.  Norma was moving toward the northwest at 6 m.p.h. (9 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1001 mb.

A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Los Barriles to Todos Santos, Mexico.

Tropical Storm Norma retains some of the structural features that it had when it was a hurricane.  The remnants of a large circular eye form the center of circulation.  A broken ring of strong thunderstorms surrounds the remnants of the eye and the strongest winds are occurring in that ring.  Bands of showers and weaker thunderstorms are revolving around the core of Tropical Storm Norma.  Some of the outer rainbands of Norma are already dropping heavy rain over parts of the southern end of Baja California.

Tropical Storm Norma will move through an environment that will be only marginally favorable for intensification during the next day or so.  Norma will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  An upper level trough west of North America is producing southwesterly winds which are blowing toward the top of the circulation.  Those winds are causing moderate vertical wind shear.  The circulation of Norma may also be drawing some cooler more stable air into the western part of the tropical storm.  Tropical Storm Norma could intensify somewhat during the next 24 hours, but it will eventually move over cooler water and weaken.

A ridge in the middle troposphere located east of Norma is steering the tropical storm toward the northwest and that general motion is expected to continue for another day or so.  When Norma weakens, it will be steered by the winds in the lower levels of the atmosphere.  Those winds will push Tropical Storm Norma more toward the west during the middle of the weak.  On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Storm Norma is forecast to remain west of Baja California.

Hurricane Otis intensified very rapidly on Sunday from a weak tropical storm to a Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Hurricane Otis was located at latitude 17.0°N and longitude 127.3°W which put it about 1200 miles (1930 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.  Otis was moving toward the north at 5 m.p.h. (8 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 105 m.p.h. (165 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 125 m.p.h. (200 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 973 mb.

Hurricane Otis has a very small circulation, which allowed to strengthen very rapidly when the environment became more favorable.  A small eye formed at the center of Hurricane Otis and a tight ring of very strong thunderstorms surrounded the eye.  Those storms began generating upper level divergence which pumped mass away from the center of circulation.  The pressure decreased quickly and the wind speed increased very rapidly.  Hurricane Otis still has a small circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force only extend out about 70 miles (110 km) from the center.

Hurricane Otis may be near its peak intensity.  Otis is still moving over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 27°C, but it will soon move over cooler water.  Hurricane Otis will move nearer to the upper level trough west of North America and the hurricane will encounter stronger vertical wind shear.  Because Otis is a small hurricane, it could weaken almost as fast as it intensified.

A small midlevel ridge east of Otis is steering the hurricane toward the north.  Much like Tropical Storm Norma, Otis will be steered by winds lower in the atmosphere when it weakens.  Those winds are forecast to steer Otis more toward the west-southwest later this week.

Max Rapidly Intensifies Into a Hurricane Near Acapulco

Tropical Storm Max intensified rapidly into a hurricane on Thursday morning.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Hurricane Max was located at latitude 16.3°N and longitude 99.9°W which put it about 40 miles (65 km/h) south of Acapulco, Mexico.  Max was moving toward the east at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 95 m.p.h. (155 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 988 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Zihuatenajo to Punta Maldonado, Mexico.  A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Punta Maldonado to Laguas de Chacahua, Mexico.

The circulation of Hurriane Max is quite small.  Winds to hurricane force only extend out about 15 miles (25 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extend out about 50 miles (80 km) from the center.  Although the circulation of Hurricane Max is small, it is very well organized.  There is a small circular eye at the center of circulation.  The eye is surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds are occurring in that ring of storms.

The center of Hurricane Max is very close to the coast of Mexico.  The outer fringes of the northwestern part of the circulation could already be pulling in some drier air.  Max will make landfall on the coast of Mexico within a few hours and it will start to dissipate as soon as the center make landfall.

The core of Hurricane Max will be capable of causing localized wind damage.  Max will also drop very heavy rain over parts of the states or Guerrero and Oaxaca and flash floods could occur in some areas of steeper terrain.

Elsewhere over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean, Tropical Storm Norma formed to the west of Hurricane Max.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Norma was located at latitude 17.2°N and longitude 109.5°W which put it about 395 miles (635 km) south of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico.  Norma was moving toward the north at 5 m.p.h. (8 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1004 mb.  Tropical Storm Norma is forecast to strengthen and move toward Baja California.  Normal could be a hurricane when it approaches southern Baja California in a few days.

Tropical Depression 16E Forms, Flood Risk for Mexico

Tropical Depression Sixteen-E formed south of Mexico on Wednesday morning.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Depression Sixteen-E was located at latitude 16.2°N and longitude 101.7°W which put it about 105 miles (165 km) south of Zihuatanejo, Mexico.  It was moving toward the north-northeast at 5 m.p.h. (8 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was  35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1006 mb.

A Tropical Storm Watch was issued for the portion of the coast from Zihuatanejo to Punta Maldonado, Mexico.

A distinct center of circulation formed in a cluster of thunderstorms south of Mexico and that National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Depression Sixteen-E on Wednesday morning.  The circulation of the depression was still organizing.  Several bands of showers and thunderstorms were developing south and east of the center of circulation.  There were fewer showers and thunderstorms in the northwestern quadrant of the circulation and the depression may have been pulling in drier air from Mexico.

The depression has 12 to 18 hours to strengthen before it makes landfall on the coast of Mexico.  It will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  An upper level trough extends from the eastern U.S. to Mexico.  The trough is producing westerly winds which are blowing toward the top of the circulation.  Those winds are generating moderate wind vertical shear, which will inhibit intensification.  Tropical Depression Sixteen-E could strengthen into a tropical storm before it reaches the coast of Mexico.

The upper level trough is forecast to steer Tropical Depression Sixteen-E toward the east.  On its anticipated track the depression could make landfall east of Zihuatanejo in less than 24 hours.  The depression will bring gusty winds, but heavy rain poses a greater threat.  Heavy rain falling in steeper terrain could cause flash floods.

Elsewhere over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean, Tropical Depression Fifteen-E was moving farther away from Mexico.  Tropical Depression Fifteen-E formed when momentum from the upper half of the circulation of former Hurricane Katia spun up a new surface circulation over the Eastern North Pacific.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Depression Fifteen-E was located at latitude 14.9°N and longitude 120.6°W which put it about 890 miles (1435 km) southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.  It was moving toward the west at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1004 mb.

Tropical Storm Lidia Weakens, Still Raining on Baja California

Tropical Storm Lidia has weakened but it is producing rain over Baja California.  At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Lidia was located at latitude 28.3°N and longitude 114.6°W which put it about 40 miles (65 km) northeast of Punta Eugenia, Mexico.  Lidia was moving toward the northwest at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 999 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for the portion of the coast from Punta Abreojos to San Jose de Las Palomas, from Mulege to Isla San Luis and from Guaymas to Puerto Libertad, Mexico.

Tropical Storm Lidia weakened during the past 24 hours as it slowly moved northwest over Baja California.  There are some indications that the upper portion of the circulation may have decoupled from the lower half of Tropical Storm Lidia.  The upper portion of the circulation appears to be over the Gulf of California.  There are stronger thunderstorms over the Gulf of California because the Sea Surface Temperature is near 32°C in that body of water.  Those thunderstorms are producing heavy rain over parts of the eastern side of Baja California and the western part of Mexico adjacent to the Gulf of California.  The lower level center appears to be located northeast of Punta Eugenia over the Pacific Ocean just west of Baja California.  There are showers and thunderstorms near the low level center and they are dropping heavy rain in that area.  The potential for flash floods still exists in the areas where heavy rain is falling.

The low level center of Tropical Storm Lidia is forecast to continue to move toward the northwest.  Lidia will continue to weaken because the low level center is moving over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 23°C.  It will take several more days for the low level center to spin down and it could still produce locally heavy rain over the northern part of Baja California during that time.  The upper level portion of the circulation will likely be absorbed by the larger scale environmental flow in those levels.  Some clouds and moisture in the upper levels could flow over the southwestern U.S.

Tropical Storm Lidia Brings Wind and Heavy Rain to Baja California

Tropical Storm Lidia brought gusty winds and very heavy rain to Baja California on Thursday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Lidia was located at latitude 23.3°N and longitude 110.4°W which put it about 40 miles (65 km) northwest of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico.  Lidia was moving toward the north-northwest at 4 m.p.h. (6 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 991 mb.

A Hurricane Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Puerto Cortes to La Paz, Mexico including Cabo San Lucas.  A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Punta Eugenia to Bahia San Juan Bautista including Cabo San Lucas and from Bahia Tempehuaya to Bahia Kino.  A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Punta Eugenia to San Juan de Las Palomas and from Bahia San Juan Bautista to Isla San Luis and from Bahia Kino to Puerto Libertad.

Tropical Storm Lidia intensified as it approached the southern tip of Baja California on Thursday.  Several bands of showers and thunderstorms wrapped around the center of circulation and a partial eyewall appeared to form.  The airport at Cabo San Lucas reported sustained winds of 58 m.p.h. (83 km/h) and a Mexican automated station reported a sustained wind of 70 m.p.h. (113 km/h) and gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h) at a height of 735 feet (244 meters).  Tropical Storm Lidia has a large circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extend out about 185 miles (295 km) from the center of circulation.

The large size of Tropical Storm Lidia meant that it was bringing tropical storm winds to the southern part of Baja California and parts of the west coast of Mexico.  Lidia was also producing very heavy rain over Baja California.  Flash floods are likely in places where steep terrain causes water to run off quickly.

Tropical Storm Lidia is forecast to move slowly north-northwest over Baja California.  The slow motion will prolong the period of gusty winds.  It will also cause the rain totals to be higher and increase the risk for floods.  Much of the circulation will remain over water and the large size of Lidia will mean that the tropical storm will weaken slowly.

Tropical Storm Lidia Threatens Baja California

Tropical Storm Lidia became an increased threat to Baja California as it moved closer on Wednesday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Lidia was located at latitude 20.7°N and longitude 109.2°W which put it about 160 miles (255 km) south-southeast of the southern tip of Baja California.  Lidia was moving toward the north-northwest at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1001 mb.

A Hurricane Watch is in effect for the portion of the coast from Puerto Cortes to La Paz, Mexico including Cabo San Lucas.  A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for the portion of the coast from Puerto Cortes to San Evaristo including Cabo San Lucas and from Tempehuaya to Huatabampito, Mexico.  A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for the portion of the coast from San Evaristo to Loreto, Mexico and from Puerto Cortes to Puerto Andresito.

A distinct center of circulation began consolidating in a large area of low pressure previously designated Potential Tropical Cyclone Fourteen-E on Wednesday.  Numerous bands of showers and thunderstorms started developing around the consolidating center.  There were more showers and thunderstorms in the southern half of the circulation than there were in the northern half of the circulation.  Thunderstorms southwest of the center of circulation were beginning to generate some upper level divergence, but it was not well developed.  Tropical Storm Lidia formed out of a large low pressure system and it still has a large circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extend out about 120 miles (195 km) from the center on the eastern side of Lidia.

Tropical Storm Lidia was in an environment that was marginally favorable for intensification on Wednesday.  Lidia was moving over water where the Sea Surface Temperature was near 30°C.  An upper level ridge to the east of Lidia was producing westerly winds which were causing moderate vertical wind shear, especially over the northern half of the circulation.  The environment around Tropical Storm Lidia is forecast to become a little more favorable for intensification on Thursday.  The upper level winds are forecast to become weaker, which would reduce the wind shear.  Lidia will still be moving over very warm water and it should intensify on Thursday.  The rate of intensification could increase as the core of the tropical storm becomes more organized.  There is a chance that Lidia could strengthen into a hurricane which is why there is a Hurricane Watch for part of Baja California.

Lidia is moving around the western end of a subtropical ridge, which is steering the tropical storm toward the north-northwest.  A general north-northwesterly motion is expected to continue for another day or two.  On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Storm Lidia could reach the southern tip of Baja California by Thursday evening.  In addition to gusty winds Tropical Storm Lidia will produce very heavy rain.  Heavy rain falling on the steep terrain of Baja California creates the risk of flash floods.