Hurricane Humberto Brings Strong Winds to Bermuda

Hurricane Humberto brought strong winds to Bermuda on Wednesday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Hurricane Humberto was located at latitude 34.0°N and longitude 63.9°W which put it about 130 miles (215 km) northeast of Bermuda.  Humberto was moving toward the northeast at 23 m.p.h. (37 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 120 m.p.h. (195 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 140 m.p.h. (225 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 952 mb.

The Hurricane Warning for Bermuda was changed to a Tropical Storm Warning because Hurricane Humberto was moving rapidly away from Bermuda.

Although the center of Hurricane Humberto passed just to the northwest of Bermuda, Humberto did produce hurricane force winds on Bermuda.  The weather station at the L.F. Wade International airport measured a sustained wind speed of 82 m.p.h. (132 km/h) and a wind gust to 114 m.p.h. (184 km/h).  There were reports of power electrical outages and wind damage on Bermuda.  Conditions will improve on Thursday when Hurricane Humberto moves rapidly away from Bermuda.

A trough over the eastern U.S. will steer Hurricane Humberto rapidly toward the northeast on Thursday.  Humberto will move into a less favorable environment.  The upper level trough will cause moderate vertical wind shear.  Hurricane Humberto will start to move over cooler water.  Moderate shear and cooler water will cause Hurricane Humberto to weaken during the next several days.  While Humberto moves into a less tropical environment, it will make a transition to a strong extratropical cyclone.

Elsewhere, Tropical Depression Imelda continued to drop heavy rain over parts of eastern Texas and southwestern Louisiana and Tropical Storm Jerry threatened the northern Leeward Islands.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Depression Imelda was located at latitude 31.2°N and longitude 94.9°W which put it about 110 miles (175 km) north-northeast of Houston, Texas.  Imelda was moving toward the north at 3 m.p.h. (5 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 30 m.p.h. (50 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1008 mb.

At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Jerry was located at latitude 15.4°N and longitude 51.8°W which put it about 675 miles (1085 km) east of the Leeward Islands.  Jerry was moving toward the west-northwest at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 997 mb.  Tropical Storm Watches were in effect for St. Maarten, St. Martin, St. Barthelemy, Barbuda, Anguilla, Saba and St. Eustatius.

Tropical Storm Jerry Strengthens East of Leeward Islands

Tropical Storm Jerry strengthened east of the Leeward Islands on Wednesday.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Jerry was located at latitude 14.6°N and longitude 49.2°W which put it about 855 miles east of the Leeward Islands.  Jerry was moving toward the west-northwest at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb.

The circulation around Tropical Storm Jerry exhibited much more organization on Wednesday.  A long band of thunderstorms curved around the western and southern sides of the center of circulations.  Other bands of showers and thunderstorms developed and began to revolve around the center of circulation.  Storms near the center began to generate upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the tropical storm.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 45 miles (75 km) from the center of circulation.

Tropical Storm Jerry will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next several days.  Jerry will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Tropical Storm Jerry is likely to strengthen into a hurricane during the next day or two.  Jerry could rapidly intensify once it develops an inner core with an eye and an eyewall.

Tropical Storm Jerry will move south of a subtropical ridge over the Atlantic Ocean.  The ridge will steer Jerry toward the west-northwest.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Jerry could approach the northern Leeward Islands on Friday.  Jerry is likely to be a hurricane by that time.

Elsewhere, Hurricane Humberto was nearing Bermuda and Tropical Depression Imelda was dropping heavy rain over parts of eastern Texas and southwestern Louisiana.  At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Hurricane Humberto was located at latitude 32.4°N and longitude 67.2°W which put it about 140 miles (225 km) west of Bermuda.  Humberto was moving toward the east-northeast at 16 m.p.h. (26 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 120 m.p.h. (195 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 140 m.p.h. (225 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 952 mb.  A Hurricane Warning was in effect for Bermuda.

At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Depression Imelda was located at latitude 30.6°N and longitude 95.6°W which put it about 65 miles (105 km) north of Houston, Texas.  Imelda was moving toward the north at 5 m.p.h. (8 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 30 m.p.h. (50 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1009 mb.  Flash Flood Watches were in effect for parts of eastern Texas and southwestern Louisiana.

Hurricane Humberto Strengthens to a Major Hurricane, Warning for Bermuda

Hurricane Humberto strengthened into a major hurricane on Tuesday and a Hurricane Warning was issued for Bermuda.  At 11:00 pm. EDT on Tuesday the center of Hurricane Humberto was located at latitude 31.3°N and longitude 71.0°W which put it about 370 miles (595 km) west of Bermuda.  Humberto was moving toward the east-northeast at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 115 m.p.h. (185 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 140 m.p.h. (225 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 951 mb.

Hurricane Humberto exhibited the structure of a large mature hurricane on Tuesday night.  There was a circular eye at the center of circulation.  A ring of strong thunderstorms surrounded the eye and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hurricane Humberto.  The stronger rainbands were occurring in the northern half of the circulation.  Humberto appeared to be drawing drier air around the southern half of the circulation and bands in that part of the hurricane consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.

Winds to hurricane force extended out about 45 miles (75 km) from the center of Hurricane Humberto.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 150 miles (240 km) from the center of circulation.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Hurricane Humberto was 20.6.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 16.9 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 37.5.  Hurricane Humberto was capable of causing major wind damage.

Hurricane Humberto will remain in an environment capable of supporting a major hurricane for another 12 to 24 hours.  Humberto will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28.5°C.  An upper level trough over the eastern U.S. will produce southwesterly winds which will blow toward the top of the hurricane.  Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear, but the shear may not be strong enough to cause Hurricane Humberto to weaken on Wednesday.

Hurricane Humberto will move around the northern side of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean.  The high and the upper level trough over the eastern U.S.  will combine to steer Humberto toward the east-northeast on Wednesday.  On its anticipated track the center of Hurricane Humberto could approach Bermuda on Wednesday evening.  Humberto could still be a major hurricane at that time.  If the center of Hurricane Humberto passes just north of Bermuda, then the strongest winds could affect Bermuda.

Elsewhere, Tropical Depression Imelda was dropping heavy rain near Houston, Texas and Tropical Depression Ten was churning toward the northern Leeward Islands.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Depression Imelda was located at latitude 29.8°N and longitude 95.5°W which put it about 10 miles (15 km) northwest of Houston, Texas.  Imelda was moving toward the north at 6 m.p.h. (10 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there  were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1007 mb.

At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Depression Ten was located at latitude 13.7°N and longitude 46.7°W which put it about 1030 miles (1660 km) east of the Leeward Islands.  It was moving toward the west-northwest at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1006 mb.

Tropical Storm Lorena Forms, Watch Issued for Mexico

Tropical Storm Lorena formed south of Mexico on Tuesday and a Tropical Storm Watch was issued for a portion of the coast.  At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Storm Lorena was located at latitude 13.9°N and longitude 100.4°W which put it about 275 miles (440 km) south-southeast of Zihuatanejo, Mexico.  Lorena was moving toward the northwest at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1004 mb.

A Tropical Storm Watch was issued for the portion of the coast from Zihuatanejo to Cabo Corrientes, Mexico.

A distinct low level center of circulation formed in a cluster of thunderstorms south of Mexico on Tuesday and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Storm Lorena.  The circulation around Lorena was still organizing.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were curling around the western side of the center of circulation.  Bands in the eastern half of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.  An upper level ridge over Mexico was producing northeasterly winds which were blowing toward the top of the circulation.  Those winds were causing moderate vertical wind shear and they may have been the reason why the bands were stronger in the western half of  Tropical Storm Lorena.

Tropical Storm Lorena will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next several days.  Lorena will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  The upper level ridge will continue to cause some vertical wind shear, which will inhibit intensification.  The shear is likely to slow the rate at which Tropical Storm Lorena intensifies.  Lorena could move near the west coast of Mexico.  If the center moves near the coast, then the circulation could draw some drier air into the tropical storm.  The drier would likely cause Tropical Storm Lorena to weaken.  If the center of Lorena remains west of the coast of Mexico, then it could strengthen into a hurricane later this week.

A ridge over Mexico will steer Tropical Storm Lorena toward the northwest during the next few days.  On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Storm Lorena could be near the west coast of Mexico by Wednesday night.  That is the reason the government of Mexico issued a Tropical Storm Watch for that portion of the coast.  Lorena could approach Baja California in four or five days.

Elsewhere over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean, Hurricane Kiko was weakening slowly well east of Hawaii and Tropical Depression Fourteen-E developed south of Baja California.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Hurricane Kiko was located at latitude 17.0°N and longitude 125.0°W which put it about 1060 miles (1705 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.  Kiko was moving toward the west-southwest at 5 m.p.h. (8 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 987 mb.

At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Depression Fourteen-E was located at latitude 11.9°N and longitude 108.2°W which put it about 720 miles (1235 km) south of the southern tip of Baja California.  it was moving toward the north-northwest at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1008 mb.

Tropical Storm Imelda Forms Along Upper Texas Coast

Tropical Storm Imelda formed along the Upper Texas coast on Tuesday.  At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Storm Imelda was located at latitude 29.0°N and longitude 95.3°W which put it near Freeport, Texas.  Imelda was moving toward the north at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1005 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Sargent to Port Bolivar, Texas.

A small low pressure system over the northwestern Gulf of Mexico exhibited greater organization on satellite and radar images on Tuesday.  When a surface weather station reported a sustained wind speed of 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h), the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Storm Imelda.  The winds to tropical storm force were occurring southeast of the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 45 miles (75 km) in the southeastern quadrant of Tropical Storm Imelda.

Tropical Storm Imelda will move around the western end of a warm high pressure system over the southeastern U.S.  The high will steer Imelda slowly toward the north during the next several days.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Imelda will move slowly inland over east Texas.  Although Imelda will cause a small storm surge along the coast around the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, locally heavy rain will pose a much greater risk.  Southeasterly winds blowing around the eastern side of Tropical Storm Imelda will transport very moist air over parts of eastern Texas.  Over a foot of rain (0.33 meters) could fall in some locations where rain bands linger.  Flash Flood Watches have been issued for a number of counties around Houston and Galveston.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, Hurricane Humberto moved closer to Bermuda and Tropical Depression Ten formed east of the Lesser Antilles.  At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Hurricane Humberto was located at latitude 30.8°N and longitude 72.9°W which put it about 490 miles (785 km) west-southwest of Bermuda.  Humberto was moving toward the east-northeast at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 120 m.p.h. (195 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 961 mb.

A Hurricane Watch and a Tropical Storm Warning were in effect for Bermuda.

At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Depression Ten was located at latitude 12.9°N and longitude 44.9°W which put it about 1165 miles (1870 km) east-southeast of the Leeward Islands.  It was moving toward the west-northwest at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1007 mb.  The depression is forecast to strengthen into a hurricane while it moves toward the northern Leeward Islands.

Humberto Strengthens Into a Hurricane

Former Tropical Storm Humberto strengthened into a hurricane on Sunday evening.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Hurricane Humberto was located at latitude 29.4°N and longitude 77.6°W which put it about 785 miles (1260 km) west of Bermuda.  Humberto was moving toward the northeast at 3 m.p.h. (5 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 988 mb.

Former Tropical Storm Humberto strengthened steadily on Sunday and the circulation exhibited greater organization.  The inner end of a rainband wrapped around the center of circulation and an eye appeared to be developing.  There was a broken ring of thunderstorms around the developing eye and the strongest winds were occurring in the eastern side of the ring.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hurricane Humberto.  There were more rainbands in the eastern half of the circulation.  Winds to hurricane force extended out about 25 miles (40 km) from the center of circulation.  Wind to tropical storm force extended out about 150 miles (240 km) on the eastern side of Humberto and out about 70 miles (110 km) on the western side.

Hurricane Humberto will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next two to three days.  Humberto will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  Am upper level trough over the eastern U.S. will produce southwesterly winds which will cause some vertical wind shear.  However, the shear will not be strong enough to prevent intensification.  Hurricane Humberto will intensify during the next 24 to 48 hours and it could strengthen into a major hurricane.

Hurricane Humberto moved around the western end of a subtropical high pressure system over the western Atlantic Ocean.  Humberto will move slowly toward the northeast on Monday.  The upper level trough and the subtropical high will combine to steer Humberto toward the east during the next few days.  On its anticipated track Hurricane Humberto could approach Bermuda by late on Wednesday.

Hurricane Kiko Strengthens to Cat. 4

Hurricane Kiko strengthened to Category 4 on the Saffir-Simpson Scale on Sunday.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Hurricane Kiko was located at latitude 17.0°N and longitude 121.1°W which put it about 835 miles (1340 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.  Kiko was moving toward the west at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 130 m.p.h. (215 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 160 m.p.h. (260 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 950 mb.

The circulation around Hurricane Kiko remained well organized.  A circular eye with a diameter of 24 miles (39 km) was at the center of Kiko.  The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hurricane Kiko.  Kiko remained a small hurricane.  Winds to hurricane force extended out about 25 miles (40 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 70 miles (110 km).

Hurricane Kiko will move through an environment capable of supporting a major hurricane for another day or two.  Kiko move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  It will move through a region where the winds are blowing from the east at all levels and there is little vertical wind shear.  Sinking motion on the south side of a subtropical high pressure system north of Kiko could transport some drier air toward the hurricane.  Hurricane Kiko could be near its peak intensity, but it is likely to remain a powerful hurricane for several more days.

The subtropical ridge over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean will steer Hurricane Kiko toward the west during the next several days.  On its anticipated track Kiko will move away from Baja California and in the general direction of Hawaii.

Kiko Rapidly Intensifies Into Hurricane Southwest of Baja California

Former Tropical Storm Kiko rapidly intensified into a hurricane southwest of Baja California on Saturday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Hurricane Kiko was located at latitude 17.1°N and longitude 119.3°W which put it about 730 miles (1175 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.  Kiko was moving toward the west at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 985 mb.

The circulation around Hurricane Kiko strengthened rapidly on Saturday.  A circular eye with a diameter of 24 miles (39 km) developed at the center of Kiko.  The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hurricane Kiko.  Storms near the core were generating upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the hurricane.  The circulation around Kiko was small, but symmetrical.  Winds to hurricane force extended out about 20 miles (30 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 70 miles (110 km) from the center.

Hurricane Kiko will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next day or two.  Kiko will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  It will move through a region where the winds at all levels are blowing from the east.  So, there will little vertical wind shear.  Hurricane Kiko is will intensify further and it could strengthen into a major hurricane.

Hurricane Kiko will move south of a subtropical ridge over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean.  The ridge will steer Kiko toward the west.  On its anticipated track Hurricane Kiko will move away from Baja California and toward Hawaii.

Tropical Storm Humberto Develops East of the Bahamas

Former Tropical Depression Nine strengthened into Tropical Storm Humberto east of the Bahamas on Friday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Friday night the center of Tropical Storm Humberto was located at latitude 25.6°N and longitude 75.2°W which put it about 130 miles (210 km) east-southeast of Great Abaco, Bahamas.  Humberto was moving toward the northwest at 6 m.p.h. (10 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1008 mb.

Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the Abacos, the Berry Islands, Bimini, Eleuthera, Grand Bahama Island and New Providence.

A NOAA research aircraft flying through former Tropical Depression Nine on Friday night determined that the depression had strengthened into Tropical Storm Humberto.  The aircraft reported that the maximum sustained wind speed had increased to 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h).  The circulation around Tropical Storm Humberto was still poorly organized.  A few thunderstorms developed just to the north of the center of circulation.  A band of showers and thunderstorms curved around the eastern side of the circulation.  Bands in the other parts of Tropical Storm Humberto consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.

Tropical Storm Humberto will move through an environment somewhat favorable for intensification during the next few days.  Humberto will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.   A large upper level low over the Gulf of Mexico will produce southerly winds which will blow toward the top of the tropical storm. Those winds will cause moderate vertical wind shear and they will inhibit intensification.  The upper low is forecast to move westward away from Humberto and the wind shear could decrease during the weekend. Tropical Storm Humberto is forecast to slowly become more organized and it could strengthen into a hurricane.

The upper low over the Gulf of Mexico will help to steer Tropical Storm Humberto toward the northwest during the next day or two.  A strong upper level trough over the Great Lakes will start to turn Humberto toward the east later in the weekend.  On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Storm Humberto could move near the Northwestern Bahamas.  If Humberto brings wind and rain to that region, it will hinder efforts to recover from Hurricane Dorian.

Tropical Depression Nine Develops Near the Bahamas

Tropical Depression Nine developed near the Bahamas on Friday afternoon.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Depression Nine was located at latitude 25.6°N and longitude 75.0°W which put it about 140 miles (225 km) east-southeast of Great Abaco, Bahamas.  It was moving toward the northwest at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 30 m.p.h. (50 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1009 mb.

Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the Abacos, the Berry Islands, Bimini, Eleuthera, Grand Bahama Island and New Providence.  A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the portion of the Florida coast from Jupiter Inlet to the Volusia/Brevard County Line.

An Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter plane was able to identify a low level center of circulation in a tropical disturbance near the Bahamas on Friday afternoon and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Depression Nine.  The center of circulation developed on the southwestern side of a cluster of thunderstorms just east of the Bahamas.  The circulation around the depression was still in the early stages of organization.  Most of the stronger thunderstorms were occurring in the eastern half of the tropical depression.  Bands in the western half of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.

Tropical Depression Nine will move through an environment somewhat favorable for intensification during the next few days.  The tropical depression will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  A large upper level low over the Gulf of Mexico will produce southerly winds which will blow toward the top of the depression.  Those winds will cause moderate vertical wind shear and they will inhibit intensification.  The upper low is forecast to move westward away from the  tropical depression and the wind shear could decrease during the weekend.  Tropical Depression Nine is forecast to slowly become more organized and it could strengthen into a tropical storm.

The upper low over the Gulf of Mexico will help to steer Tropical Depression Nine toward the northwest during the next day or two.  A strong upper level trough over the Great Lakes will start to turn the depression toward the east later in the weekend.  On its anticipated track the center of the depression could move near the Northwestern Bahamas.  If Tropical Depression Nine brings wind and rain to that region, it will hinder efforts to recover from Hurricane Dorian.