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Tropical Storm Karen Drops Heavy Rain on Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands

Tropical Storm Karen dropped heavy rain on parts of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands on Tuesday.  At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Storm Karen was located at latitude 17.5°N and longitude 66.0°W which put it about 65 miles (105 km) south of San Juan Puerto Rico.  Karen was moving toward the north at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1005 mb.

Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for Puerto Rico including Vieques and Culebra, the U.S. Virgin Islands and the British Virgin Islands.

The circulation around Tropical Storm Karen exhibited more organization on Tuesday afternoon.  A new low level center of circulation formed a little farther to the west near a cluster of stronger thunderstorms.  The minimum surface pressure decreased by several millibars.  More thunderstorms formed near the center of circulation and in bands revolving around the center.  Storms near the newly reformed center of circulation were generating more upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the tropical storm.  The removal of mass was what allowed the surface pressure to decrease.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 80 miles (130 km) from the center of circulation.

Tropical Storm Karen will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 24 to 48 hours.  Karen will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  Karen has moved under the middle of an upper level ridge over the eastern Caribbean Sea where the upper level winds are weaker.  There will be less vertical wind shear during the next day or two.  The environment around Tropical Storm Karen will support intensification.  However, the center of Karen will pass over Puerto Rico during the next 24 hours.  The mountains in Puerto Rico will disrupt the circulation in the lower levels and Tropical Storm Karen will weaken when it passes over those mountains.  Karen will likely strengthen again when it moves north of Puerto Rico.

Tropical Storm Karen will move around the western end of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer Karen toward the north during the next day or two.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Karen will move across Puerto Rico during the next 24 hours.  Karen will drop heavy rain on parts of Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and the British Virgin Islands.  Prolonged heavy rain will create a high risk for flash floods in those areas.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, Tropical Storm Jerry was moving slowly toward Bermuda and Tropical Storm Lorenzo was strengthening west of the Cabo Verde Islands.  At 2:00 p.m. EDT the center of Tropical Storm Jerry was located at latitude 30.9°N and longitude 69.1°W which put it about 270 miles (435 km) west-southwest of Bermuda.  Jerry was moving toward the north-northeast at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 992 mb.  A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for Bermuda.

At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Storm Lorenzo was located at latitude 12.4°N and longitude 29.3°W which put it about 270 miles (435 km) west-southwest of the Cabo Verde Islands.  Lorenzo was moving toward the west-northwest at 16 m.p.h. (26 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 997 mb

Tropical Storm Karen Develops Near Windward Islands

Tropical Storm Karen developed near the Windward Islands on Sunday morning.  At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Tropical Storm Karen was located at latitude 11.9°N and longitude 60.9°W which put it about 55 miles (90 km) east-southeast of Grenada.  Karen was moving toward the west-northwest at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1005 mb.

Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for Trinidad and Tobago, Grenada, and for St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

A center of circulation developed in an area of thunderstorms east of the axis of a strong tropical wave near the Windward Islands on Sunday morning and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Storm Karen.  The strongest thunderstorms were forming in bands south and west of the center of circulation.  Bands north and west of the center consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.   Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 125 miles (200 km) on the eastern side of the tropical storm.

An upper level trough northeast of the Lesser Antilles was producing strong westerly winds which were blowing across the northern side of Tropical Storm Karen.  An upper level ridge over the Caribbean Sea was producing strong northeasterly winds which were blowing across the western part of Karen.  The upper level winds were causing moderate vertical wind shear which was inhibiting the development of thunderstorms in those parts of Tropical Storm Karen.  The center of circulation developed in a region between the stronger upper level westerly and northeasterly winds.  Most of the thunderstorms were forming in that area where the upper level winds were not as strong.

Tropical Storm Karen will move through an environment that will be only marginally favorable for intensification during the next day or two.  Karen will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature  is near 29°C.  However, the upper level trough and upper level ridge will continue to cause moderate vertical wind shear.  If Tropical Storm Karen remains in the zone where the upper level winds are not as strong, it could strengthen.  However, if Karen moves under stronger upper level winds, it could weaken to a depression.  Tropical Storm Karen is forecast to move closer to the center of the upper level ridge in two or three days.  If that happens, then the upper level winds will be weaker and Karen could intensify.

Tropical Storm Karen will move around the western end of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer Karen toward the west-northwest during the next 12 hours.  Karen will move more toward the north when reaches the end of the ridge.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Karen will move across the Windward Islands on Sunday.  Karen will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain.  Flash floods are likely.  Tropical Storm Karen could approach Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands on Tuesday.  Tropical Storm Watches are likely to be issued for those islands.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean Tropical Storm Jerry was spinning south of Bermuda.  At 5:00 a.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Tropical Storm Jerry was located at latitude 25.0°N and longitude 66.9°W which put it about 520 miles (835 km) south-southwest of Bermuda.  Jerry was moving toward the north-northwest at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb.

Strong Tropical Wave Brings Wind and Rain to Windward Islands

A strong tropical wave was bringing wind and rain to the Windward Islands.  At 8:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of the tropical wave was located at latitude 11.9°N and longitude 59.5°W which put it about 75 miles (120 km) northeast of Tobago.  The wave was moving toward the west at 20 m.p.h. (32 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1009 mb.

The axis of the tropical wave stretched from near Barbados to just east of Trinidad and Tobago.  More thunderstorms developed near the axis of the wave on Saturday night and there were indications that a center of circulation could be forming northeast of Trinidad and Tobago.  There were winds to near tropical storm force.  The National Hurricane Center issued a special Tropical Weather Outlook on Saturday night and indicated that tropical storm watches and warnings might need to be issued on Sunday.  The wave is forecast to move over the Windward Islands and into the eastern Caribbean Sea on Sunday.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, Tropical Storm Jerry was located north of Puerto Rico.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Jerry was location at latitude 24.1°N and longitude 66.3°W which put it about 575 miles (925 km) south of Bermuda.  Jerry was moving toward the northwest at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb.

Hurricane Jerry Passing North of Leeward Islands

Hurricane Jerry was passing north of the Leeward Islands on Friday afternoon.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Hurricane Jerry was located at latitude 19.6°N and longitude 62.0°W which put it about 120 miles (195 km) northeast of Anguilla.  Jerry was moving toward the west-northwest at 18 m.p.h. (30 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 991 mb.

Tropical Storm Watches were in effect for St. Maarten, St. Martin and St. Barthelemy.

Hurricane Jerry weakened during much of Friday, but it began to exhibited greater organization again late in the afternoon.  Thunderstorms weakened around the core of Jerry and in the rainbands on Friday morning.  The lack of stronger thunderstorms to transport stronger winds to the surface caused the circulation around the hurricane to weaken.  Northwesterly winds blowing around the eastern side of an upper level ridge over the Caribbean Sea caused more vertical wind shear.  The circulation may have also draw some drier air into the western half of the circulation.  Stronger thunderstorms began to redevelop near the center of circulation late in the afternoon.  Thunderstorms also began to form in a band on the western side of Hurricane Jerry.  The circulation around Jerry was small.  Winds to hurricane force extended out 20 miles (30 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 90 miles (145 km) from the center.

Hurricane Jerry will move through an environment somewhat favorable for intensification during the weekend.  Jerry will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  It will move near the eastern side of an upper level ridge and the ridge will cause some vertical wind shear.  If the shear is greater, the Hurricane Jerry could weaken to a tropical storm.  If the shear is less then Hurricane Jerry could intensify.  It is possible that the wind speed in Hurricane Jerry will fluctuate during the weekend as the strength of the upper level wind changes.

Hurricane Jerry will move south of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer Jerry toward the west-northwest during the next 12 to 24 hours.  A portion of the high is forecast to weaken during the weekend and if that happens, then Hurricane Jerry could move northward.  On its anticipated track Hurricane Jerry will pass north of the Leeward Islands and Puerto Rico.

Imelda’s Remnants Cause Flash Floods in Southeast Texas

The remnants of former Tropical Storm Imelda caused flash floods over parts of southeastern Texas on Thursday.  The National Weather Service extended Flash Flood Emergencies for portions of southwestern San Jacinto County, east central Montgomery County, Chambers County and Liberty County.

At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Depression Imelda was located at latitude 30.5°N and longitude 95.5°W which put it about 55 miles (90 km) north of Houston, Texas.  Imelda was moving toward the northwest at 6 m.p.h. (9 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 25 m.p.h. (40 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1009 mb.

The remnants of former Tropical Storm Imelda remained nearly stationary over southeastern Texas on Thursday morning.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms in the eastern half of the circulation were dropping heavy rain.  There were unofficial reports that some locations had received up to 30 inches (0.9 meters) of rain.  Flash flood were occurring and a portion of Interstate 10 was closed due to high water.  Southeasterly winds were transport very moist air over the region and the heavy rain was forecast to continue.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, former Tropical Storm Jerry strengthened into a hurricane and Hurricane Humberto sped away from Bermuda.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Hurricane Jerry was located at latitude 16.8°N and longitude 54.4°W which put it about 490 miles (785 km) east of the Leeward Islands.  Jerry was moving toward the west-northwest at 16 m.p.h. (26 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 988 mb.  Tropical Storm Watches were in effect for St. Maarten, St. Martin, St. Barthelemy, Barbuda, Anguilla, Saba and St. Eustatius.

At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Hurricane Humberto was located at latitude 36.8°N and longitude 60.0°W which put it about 415 miles (665 km) northeast of Bermuda.  Humberto was moving toward the northeast at 24 m.p.h. (39 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 110 m.p.h. (185 km/h) and there were gusts to 130 m.p.h. (210 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 955 mb.

Hurricane Humberto Brings Strong Winds to Bermuda

Hurricane Humberto brought strong winds to Bermuda on Wednesday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Hurricane Humberto was located at latitude 34.0°N and longitude 63.9°W which put it about 130 miles (215 km) northeast of Bermuda.  Humberto was moving toward the northeast at 23 m.p.h. (37 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 120 m.p.h. (195 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 140 m.p.h. (225 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 952 mb.

The Hurricane Warning for Bermuda was changed to a Tropical Storm Warning because Hurricane Humberto was moving rapidly away from Bermuda.

Although the center of Hurricane Humberto passed just to the northwest of Bermuda, Humberto did produce hurricane force winds on Bermuda.  The weather station at the L.F. Wade International airport measured a sustained wind speed of 82 m.p.h. (132 km/h) and a wind gust to 114 m.p.h. (184 km/h).  There were reports of power electrical outages and wind damage on Bermuda.  Conditions will improve on Thursday when Hurricane Humberto moves rapidly away from Bermuda.

A trough over the eastern U.S. will steer Hurricane Humberto rapidly toward the northeast on Thursday.  Humberto will move into a less favorable environment.  The upper level trough will cause moderate vertical wind shear.  Hurricane Humberto will start to move over cooler water.  Moderate shear and cooler water will cause Hurricane Humberto to weaken during the next several days.  While Humberto moves into a less tropical environment, it will make a transition to a strong extratropical cyclone.

Elsewhere, Tropical Depression Imelda continued to drop heavy rain over parts of eastern Texas and southwestern Louisiana and Tropical Storm Jerry threatened the northern Leeward Islands.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Depression Imelda was located at latitude 31.2°N and longitude 94.9°W which put it about 110 miles (175 km) north-northeast of Houston, Texas.  Imelda was moving toward the north at 3 m.p.h. (5 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 30 m.p.h. (50 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1008 mb.

At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Jerry was located at latitude 15.4°N and longitude 51.8°W which put it about 675 miles (1085 km) east of the Leeward Islands.  Jerry was moving toward the west-northwest at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 997 mb.  Tropical Storm Watches were in effect for St. Maarten, St. Martin, St. Barthelemy, Barbuda, Anguilla, Saba and St. Eustatius.

Tropical Storm Jerry Strengthens East of Leeward Islands

Tropical Storm Jerry strengthened east of the Leeward Islands on Wednesday.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Jerry was located at latitude 14.6°N and longitude 49.2°W which put it about 855 miles east of the Leeward Islands.  Jerry was moving toward the west-northwest at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb.

The circulation around Tropical Storm Jerry exhibited much more organization on Wednesday.  A long band of thunderstorms curved around the western and southern sides of the center of circulations.  Other bands of showers and thunderstorms developed and began to revolve around the center of circulation.  Storms near the center began to generate upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the tropical storm.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 45 miles (75 km) from the center of circulation.

Tropical Storm Jerry will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next several days.  Jerry will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Tropical Storm Jerry is likely to strengthen into a hurricane during the next day or two.  Jerry could rapidly intensify once it develops an inner core with an eye and an eyewall.

Tropical Storm Jerry will move south of a subtropical ridge over the Atlantic Ocean.  The ridge will steer Jerry toward the west-northwest.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Jerry could approach the northern Leeward Islands on Friday.  Jerry is likely to be a hurricane by that time.

Elsewhere, Hurricane Humberto was nearing Bermuda and Tropical Depression Imelda was dropping heavy rain over parts of eastern Texas and southwestern Louisiana.  At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Hurricane Humberto was located at latitude 32.4°N and longitude 67.2°W which put it about 140 miles (225 km) west of Bermuda.  Humberto was moving toward the east-northeast at 16 m.p.h. (26 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 120 m.p.h. (195 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 140 m.p.h. (225 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 952 mb.  A Hurricane Warning was in effect for Bermuda.

At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Depression Imelda was located at latitude 30.6°N and longitude 95.6°W which put it about 65 miles (105 km) north of Houston, Texas.  Imelda was moving toward the north at 5 m.p.h. (8 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 30 m.p.h. (50 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1009 mb.  Flash Flood Watches were in effect for parts of eastern Texas and southwestern Louisiana.

Tropical Storm Florence Still Dropping Heavy Rain on the Carolinas

Tropical Storm Florence was still dropping heavy rain on parts of the Carolinas on Saturday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Florence was located at latitude 33.6°N and longitude 79.9°W which put it about 45 miles (75 km) south-southwest of Florence, South Carolina.  Tropical Storm Florence was moving toward the west at 2 m.p.h. (3 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 997 mb.  A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from South Santee River, South Carolina to Surf City, North Carolina.

Although the inner core of Tropical Storm Florence continues to spin down slowly, the circulation covers much of North Carolina, South Carolina, and eastern Georgia.  The center and much of the circulation around Florence is over land, but strong inflow east of the center continues to transport moist air over North Carolina.  The strongest winds are occurring over the Atlantic Ocean in two rainbands east of the center.  Winds to tropical storm force extend out about 150 miles (240 km) east of the center of circulation over the Atlantic Ocean.  The winds over North Carolina and South Carolina are generally blowing at less than tropical storm force.  Thunderstorms in some rainbands could produce gusts to tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Florence has moved very slowly toward the west during the past 24 hours.  The extremely slow motion has allowed bands of showers and thunderstorms to persist over locations and rainfall totals have exceed a foot (0.3 meters) in some places.  Parts of the Cape Fear River and Trent River have already reached major flood levels.  Portions of the Neuse River are at moderate flood levels.  Sections of Interstates 95 and 40 are closed because of high water.

The high pressure system that has been blocking a northward movement of Tropical Storm Florence will start to shift to the east on Sunday.  The eastward movement of the high will allow Tropical Storm Florence to move a little faster and turn toward the northwest.  Florence could be over western North Carolina on Sunday evening.  Wind blowing up the eastern slopes of the will enhance rainfall.  Tropical Storm Florence will continue to drop heavy rain over North Carolina and South Carolina on Sunday.  The heavy rain could cause rivers and streams to go higher.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, Tropical Storm Helene neared the Azores, Tropical Storm Isaac weakened to a tropical wave over the Caribbean Sea and Tropical Storm Joyce was pulled northeast in the wake of Helene.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Helene was located at latitude 40.2°N and longitude 32.1°W which put it about 75 miles (120 km) northwest of Flores, Azores.  Helene was moving toward the northeast at 24 m.p.h. (39 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 989 mb.  A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for all of the Azores.

At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Joyce was located at latitude 33.1°N and longitude 39.6°W which put it about 785 miles (1260 km) west-southwest of the Azores.  Joyce was moving toward the east-northeast at 17 m.p.h. (28 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb.

Hurricane Florence Makes Landfall Near Wilmington, North Carolina

Hurricane Florence made landfall near Wilmington, North Carolina on Friday morning.  The National Hurricane Center stated that the center of Hurricane Florence officially made landfall near Wrightsville Beach or about five miles east of Wilmington at 7:15 a.m. EDT on Friday.  The maximum sustained wind speed was 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h) at the time of landfall.  Hurricane Florence moved slowly toward the west after landfall.

At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Hurricane Florence was located at latitude 34.0°N and longitude 78.4°W which put it about 35 miles (55 km/h) east-northeast of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.  Florence was moving toward the west at 5 m.p.h. (8 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 968 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from South Santee River, South Carolina to Bogue Inlet, North Carolina including Pamlico Sound.  Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the portions of the coast from Edisto Beach, South Carolina to South Santee River and from Bogue Inlet to Duck, North Carolina including Albemarle Sound.

Hurricane Florence did produce sustained winds to hurricane force when hit North Carolina.  A National Data Buoy Center C-MAN station (CLKN7) reported a sustained wind speed of 81 m.p.h. (131 km/h) and a wind gust of 101 m.p.h. (163 km/h).  A buoy east of the center of Hurricane Florencereported a wind gust of 112 m.p.h. (180 km/h) near the time of landfall.  The airport at Wilmington, North Carolina reported a wind gust of 87 m.p.h. (140 km/h).

The center of Hurricane Florence has been inland for a few hours and the circulation is gradually spinning down.  There is still a well organized center of circulation, but they eye has filled in with clouds and showers.  The strongest winds are occurring in rainbands that are still out over the Atlantic Ocean.  Friction is reducing the wind speed in the part of the circulation over land.

Hurricane Florence continues to pose serious risks for southeastern North Carolina and eastern South Carolina.  A prolonged period of tropical storm force winds and occasional gusts to hurricane force could bring down trees and add to the widespread power outages.  On the eastern side of Hurricane Florence the wind will push water toward the shore and the threat of coastal flooding continues.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms will drop heavy rain and flash flooding is likely near rivers and streams that are already at bankful.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, Tropical Storm Helene was speeding toward the Azores, Tropical Depression Isaac was moving over the eastern Caribbean Sea and Tropical Storm Joyce was moving west of Helene.

At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Helene was located at latitude 32.9°N and longitude 36.3°W which put it about 655 miles (1055 km) southwest of the Azores.  Helene was moving toward the north  at 23 m.p.h. (37 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 70 m.p.h. (110km/h) and there were wind gusts to 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 988 mb.  A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for all of the Azores.

At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Depression Isaac was located at latitude 14.9°N and longitude 67.3°W.  Isaac was moving toward the west at 16 m.p.h. (26 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1007 mb.

At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Joyce was located at latitude 31.6°N and longitude 44.6°W which put it about 1090 miles (1755 km) west-southwest of the Azores.  Joyce was moving toward the south at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1003 mb.

Hurricane Florence Wobbles Closer to North Carolina

Hurricane Florence wobbled closer to the coast of North Carolina on Thursday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Hurricane Florence was located at latitude 34.0°N and longitude 76.8°W which put it about 60 miles east-southeast of Wilmington, North Carolina.  Florence was moving toward the northwest at 6 m.p.h.  The maximum sustained wind speed was 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 105 m.p.h. (165 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 956 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from South Santee River, South Carolina to Duck, North Carolina including Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds.  A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Edisto Beach to South Santee River, South Carolina.  A Tropical Storm Warning was also in effect for the portion of the coast from Duck, North Carolina to Cape Charles Light, Virginia and for Chesapeake Bay south of New Point Comfort.

Hurricane Florence is already affecting the coast.  National Data Buoy Center C-MAN station CLKN7 at Cape Lookout, North Carolina reported a sustained wind speed of 81 m.p.h. (131 km/h) and a wind gust of 101 m.p.h. (163 km/h).  Storm surges were already occurring along portions of the coast east of the center of Hurricane Florence where the winds were pushing water toward the coast.  The highest surge appeared to be in the area of the western part of Pamlico Sound near the mouth of the Neuse River.  There were scattered reports of wind damage and power outages.

A high pressure system over the northeastern U.S. is blocking the northward movement of Hurricane Florence.  The high is steering Florence slowly toward the northwest.  On its anticipated track Hurricane Florence will make a landfall near Wilmington, North Carolina on Friday.  Florence could move a little south of due west after landfall.  The center will pass a little north of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina and then move toward Columbia, South Carolina.  Florence is likely to continue to weaken slowly.  Because of the slow movement, many locations will experience extended periods of gusty winds.  Power outages are likely to become more widespread on Friday.  Hurricane Florence will drop locally heavy rain.  Locations where rainbands are essentially station could receive over a foot (0.3 meters) of rain.  Serious fresh water flooding is likely to develop on Friday and Saturday.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, Tropical Storm Helene generated a Tropical Storm Watch for all of the Azores, Tropical Storm Isaac sped across the eastern Caribbean Sea and former Subtropical Storm Joyce made a transition to Tropical Storm Joyce.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Helene was located at latitude 28.6°N and longitude 36.5°W which put it about 885 miles (1425 km) southwest of the Azores.  Helene was moving toward the north at 21 m.p.h. (34 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 992 mb.

At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Isaac was located at latitude14.9°N and longitude 64.4°W which put it about 195 miles (315 km) south of St. Croix.  Isaac was moving toward the west at 16 m.p.h. (26 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1006 mb.

At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Joyce was located latitude 32.9°N and longitude 44.4°W which put it about 1040 miles (1670 km) west-southwest of the Azores.  Joyce was moving toward the south-southwest at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1003 mb.