Tag Archives: Albemarle Sound

Tropical Storm Arthur Brings Wind and Rain to Eastern North Carolina

Tropical Storm Arthur brought wind and rain to eastern North Carolina on Monday.  At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Storm Arthur was located at latitude 34.5°N and longitude 75.9°W which put it about 50 miles (80 km) south-southwest of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.  Arthur was moving toward the north-northeast at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1001 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Surf City to Duck, North Carolina including Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds.

Tropical Storm Arthur began to move more quickly toward the Outer Banks of North Carolina on Monday morning.  The distribution of thunderstorms and winds around Arthur was asymmetric.  The strong thunderstorms were occurring in bands in the eastern half of the circulation.  The strongest winds were occurring in those bands.  Bands in the western half of Tropical Storm Arthur consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 90 miles (145 km) in the eastern half of Arthur.  The winds in the western half of Arthur were mostly less than tropical storm force.

The asymmetric structure of Tropical Storm Arthur meant that the strongest winds were occurring east of the Outer Banks of North Carolina.  A buoy at Diamond Shoals was reporting a sustained wind speed of 33 m.p.h. (54 km/h) and wind gusts to 47 m.p.h. (76 km/h).  The wind speeds along the coast of North Carolina were much weaker.  Tropical Storm Arthur was dropping moderate rain over eastern North Carolina.   Wind blowing water toward the coast was causing the water level to rise in some locations.  Waves were causing erosion on some beaches.

A large upper level trough will approach Tropical Storm Arthur from the west.  The trough will turn Arthur more toward the east later on Monday.  On its anticipated track, Tropical Storm Arthur should move away from North Carolina on Monday afternoon.  Weather conditions should improve gradually when Arthur moves farther form the coast.

Tropical Storm Arthur Prompts Warning for North Carolina

Tropical Storm Arthur prompted the National Hurricane Center to issue a Tropical Storm Warning for a portion of the coast of North Carolina.  A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Surf City to Duck, North Carolina including Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds.

At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Tropical Storm Arthur was located at latitude 30.5°N and longitude 77.4°W which put it about 345 miles (560 km) south-southwest of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.  Arthur was moving toward the north-northeast at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (96 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb.

The circulation around Tropical Storm Arthur exhibited more organization on Sunday morning.  Several bands of showers and thunderstorms were wrapping around the eastern and northern parts of the circulation.  Bands on the western side of Arthur still consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 115 miles (185 km) from the center of circulation on the eastern side of Tropical Storm Arthur.  The winds on the western side of Arthur were mostly below tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Arthur will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours.  Arthur will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 25°C.  It will move under an upper level ridge centered off the southeast coast of the U.S.  The winds in the upper ridge are relatively weak and there will not be a lot of vertical wind shear.  Tropical Storm Arthur is likely to get stronger during the next 24 hours.

Tropical Storm Arthur will move around the western end of a high pressure system during the next 24 hours.  The ridge will steer Arthur toward the north-northeast during the next day or so.  A large upper level trough over the central U.S. will approach Tropical Storm Arthur on Monday.  The trough will steer Arthur more toward the east.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Arthur will approach the coast of North Carolina on Monday.  Arthur will bring gusty winds to the coast.  Wind blowing toward the shore will cause the water level to rise.  Waves will cause beach erosion.

Tropical Depression One Strengthens Into Tropical Storm Arthur

Tropical Depression One strengthened into Tropical Storm Arthur on Saturday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Arthur was located at latitude 29.4°N and longitude 77.7°W which put it about 420 miles (675 km) south-southwest of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.  Arthur was moving toward the north-northeast at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1006 mb.

A Tropical Storm Watch remains in effect for the portion of the coast from Surf City to Duck, North Carolina including Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds.

Surface observations and data from aircraft reconnaissance indicated that Tropical Depression One strengthened on Saturday night and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Storm Arthur.  Thunderstorms continued to develop near the center of circulation and storms near the center generated upper level divergence which pumped mass away to the east of the depression.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were developing.  The strongest bands were in the eastern half of the circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 80 miles (130 km) from the center in the eastern side of Tropical Storm Arthur.  Most of the winds in the western side of the circulation were less than tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Arthur will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours.  Arthur will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 25°C.  An upper level trough over the eastern Gulf of Mexico and an upper level ridge east of Florida will interact to produce southerly winds which will blow toward the top of the circulation.  Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear but the shear will not be strong enough to prevent intensification.  Tropical Storm Arthur will strengthen on Sunday.

The upper level trough and upper level ridge will steer Tropical Storm Arthur toward the north-northeast during the next 36 to 48 hours.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Arthur will approach the coast of North Carolina on Monday.  It will bring gusty winds and heavy rain to parts of the coast.  Wind blowing water toward the coast will cause the water level to rise and there will be erosion of the beaches.

Tropical Depression One Forms East of Florida

Tropical Depression One formed east of Florida on Saturday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Depression One was located at latitude 28.4°N and longitude 78.6°W which put it about 125 miles (200 km) east of Melbourne, Florida.  The depression was moving toward the north-northeast at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1008 mb.

A Tropical Storm Watch was issued for the portion of the coast from Surf City to Duck, North Carolina including Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds.

Surface observations and data from aircraft reconnaissance indicated that a distinct low pressure system formed east of Florida on Saturday and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Depression One.  More thunderstorms developed near the center of circulation.  Storms near the center began to generate upper level divergence which pumped mass away to the east of the depression.  The strongest winds were occurring in the inner part of the circulation, which was consistent with the typical structure of a tropical cyclone.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were developing.  The strongest bands were in the eastern half of the circulation.

Tropical Depression One will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next several days.  The depression will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 25°C.  An upper level trough over the eastern Gulf of Mexico and an upper level ridge east of Florida will interact to produce southerly winds which will blow toward the top of the circulation.  Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear but the shear will not be strong enough to prevent intensification.  Tropical Depression One will strengthen into a tropical storm.

The upper level trough and upper level ridge will steer Tropical Depression One toward the north-northeast during the next 36 to 48 hours.  On its anticipated track Tropical Depression One will approach the coast of North Carolina on Monday.  It will be a tropical storm by that time.  It will bring gusty winds and heavy rain to parts of the coast.  Wind blowing water toward the coast will cause the water level to rise and there will be erosion of the beaches.

Tropical Storm Fernand Forms Over W. Gulf of Mexico, Dorian Edges Away From Bahamas

Tropical Storm Fernand formed over the western Gulf of Mexico and powerful Hurricane Dorian edged slowly away from the Northwestern Bahamas on Tuesday afternoon.  At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Storm Fernand was located at latitude 23.5°N and longitude 95.3°W which put it about 160 miles (260 km) east of La Pesca, Mexico.  Fernand was moving toward the west at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1004 mb.

The government of Mexico issued a Tropical Storm Warning that was in effect for the portion of the coast from Barra del Tordo to the mouth of the Rio Grande River.

The circulation around an area of low pressure over the western Gulf of Mexico exhibited greater organization on Tuesday afternoon and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Storm Fernand.  The circulation around Fernand consisted of a broad area of lower pressure.  One rainband wrapped around the northern periphery of the circulation and a second rainband wrapped around the western periphery of the circulation.  Bands in other parts of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and low clouds.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 105 miles (170 km) from the center of the circulation on the western side of Fernand.

Tropical Storm Fernand will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours.  Fernand will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Fernand is likely to strengthen during the next 24 hours.  However, the broad circulation will limit how fast the tropical storm can intensify.

Tropical Storm Fernand will move south of an ridge of high pressure over the southern U.S.  The ridge will Fernand toward the west-northwest during the next day or two.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Fernand is expected to make landfall on the coast of Mexico between La Pesca and Mezquital on Wednesday.  Fernand will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain.  The rain could cause flash floods where Tropical Storm Fernand moves inland over northeastern Mexico.  Fernand could also cause a storm surge of 6 feet (2 meters) along the coast.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, powerful Hurricane Dorian began to edge slowly away from the Northwestern Bahamas.  At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Hurricane Dorian was located at latitude 27.5°N and longitude 78.7°W which put it about 105 miles (170 km) east of Ft. Pierce, Florida.  Dorian was moving toward the northwest at 5 m.p.h. (8 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 110 m.p.h. (175 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 130 m.p.h. (215 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 959 mb.

Hurricane Warnings were in effect for the portions of the coast from Jupiter Inlet to Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida and from Edisto Beach to South Santee River, South Carolina.  Hurricane Watches were in effect for the portions of the coast from Ponte Vedra Beach to Edisto Beach and from South Santee River to Duck, North Carolina including Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds.  Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the portions of the coast from Deerfield Beach to Jupiter Inlet, Florida and from Ponte Vedra Beach to Edisto Beach.  The Hurricane Warnings for the Northwestern Bahamas including the Abacos and Grand Bahama Island had been changed to Tropical Storm Warnings, since Dorian was moving away from those locations.

Hurricane Dorian finally started to move around the western end of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean on Tuesday.  An upper level trough over the U.S. will turn Dorian toward the northeast on Wednesday.  On its anticipated track the center of Hurricane Dorian will stay offshore and move parallel to east coast of Florida.  A small deviation to the west could bring the core of Dorian close to the coast.  The center of Hurricane Dorian could move very close to the coast of South Carolina and North Carolina on Thursday.  The circulation around Hurricane Dorian increased in size on Tuesday.  Winds to hurricane force extended out about 60 miles (95 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 170 miles (275 km) from the center.

Hurricane Florence Causes Watches for Carolinas, Isaac for the Lesser Antilles

The potential impacts of Hurricane Florence caused Hurricane Watches to be issued for the Carolinas on Tuesday morning while the approach of Tropical Storm Isaac also caused Watches to be issued for some of the Lesser Antilles.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Hurricane Florence was located at latitude 26.7°N and longitude 65.3°W which put it about 905 miles (1455 km) east-southeast of Cape Fear, North Carolina.  Florence was moving toward the west-northwest at 16 m.p.h. (26 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 130 m.p.h. (210 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 155 m.p.h. (250 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 950 mb.  A Hurricane Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Edisto Beach, South Carolina to the North Carolina-Virginia border including Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds.

Hurricane Florence was nearing the end of an eyewall replacement cycle on Tuesday morning.  A thin ring of showers and thunderstorms around the center of circulation was all that was left of the original eyewall.  A larger ring of thunderstorms surrounded an eye with a diameter of 36 miles (58 km).  Several other bands of showers and thunderstorms surround the new, larger eyewall.  Storms near the core of Hurricane Florence generated strong upper level divergence which pumped mass away from the hurricane.

The eyewall replacement cycle temporarily weakened Hurricane Florence, but it also made the circulation larger.  Winds to hurricane force extended out about 40 miles (65 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 150 miles (240 km) from the center.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Hurricane Florence was 25.1.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 15.3 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 40.4.

Hurricane Florence will be moving through an environment favorable for strong hurricanes.  Florence will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Hurricane Florence is likely to strengthen during the next 24 hours, but additional eyewall replacement cycles could cause the intensity to fluctuate.

Hurricane Florence will move around the western end of the subtropical high pressure system over the western Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer Florence in a general west-northwesterly direction.  On its anticipated track the center of Hurricane Florence could approach the coast of North Carolina and South Carolina on Thursday.  It will very likely be a major hurricane at that time.

Tropical Storm Isaac moved steadily toward the Lesser Antilles and Watches were issued for some of those islands.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Storm Isaac was located at latitude 14.6°N and longitude 49.7°W which put it about 775 miles (1250 km) east of the Lesser Antilles.  Isaac was moving toward the west at 16 m.p.h. (26 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 70 m.p.h. (110 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 996 mb.  Hurricane Watches were in effect for Guadeloupe, Martinique and Dominica.  Tropical Storm Watches were in effect for Antigua and Montserrat.

Elsewhere over the tropical Atlantic Ocean, Hurricane Helene moved far south of the Azores.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Hurricane Helene was located at latitude 16.5°N and longitude 34.3°W which put it about 1550 miles (2495 km) south-southwest of the Azores.  Helene was moving toward the northwest at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 110 m.p.h. (175 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 130 m.p.h. (210 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 966 mb.