Tag Archives: Azores

Tropical Storm Sebastien Speeds East

Tropical Storm Sebastien sped eastward across the Atlantic Ocean on Friday.  At. 4:00 p.m. EST on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Sebastien was located at latitude 26.2°N and longitude 53.7°W which put it about 815 miles (1315 km) northeast of the Leeward Islands.  Sebastien was moving toward the east-northeast at 16 m.p.h. (26 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 999 mb.

An upper level trough over the western Atlantic Ocean was producing strong southwesterly winds which were blowing toward the top of Tropical Storm Sebastien.  Those winds were producing moderate vertical wind shear.  The shear was contributing to an asymmetrical distribution of thunderstorms around Sebastien.  Stronger thunderstorms were occurring in bands north and east of the center of circulation.  Bands south and west of the center consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 200 miles (325 km) from the center of circulation.

Tropical Storm Sebastien will move through an environment that could permit it to maintain its intensity for another day or so.  Sebastien will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 25.5°C.  The upper level trough over the western Atlantic will continue to cause moderate vertical wind shear, which will inhibit intensification.  Sebastien will move over cooler water during the weekend and it should start to weaken at that time.

The upper level trough will steer Tropical Storm Sebastien toward the northeast during the weekend.  On its anticipated track Sebastien will move toward the Azores.  Sebastien is forecast to merge with a cold front before it reaches the Azores.

Subtropical Storm Rebekah Forms West of the Azores

Subtropical Storm Rebekah formed west of the Azores on Wednesday afternoon.  At 5:00 p.m. EDY on Wednesday the center of Subtropical Storm Rebekah was located at latitude 38.3°N and longitude 40.7°W which put it about 745 miles (1195 km) west of the Azores.  Rebekah was moving toward the east at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 987 mb.

Subtropical Storm Rebekah formed in a manner very similar to the way Hurricane Pablo developed last week.  A small center of circulation developed in the middle of a much larger, extratropical cyclone.  Thunderstorms developed around the center of the small low pressure system.  Even though the small low was over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 22°C, cold air in the upper troposphere generated enough instability to allow the thunderstorms to grow upward.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms developed and began to revolve around the small low pressure system, and the National Hurricane Center designated the system at Subtropical Storm Rebekah.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 90 miles (145 km) from the center of Rebekah.

Subtropical Storm Rebekah could strengthen during the next 24 hours.  Although Rebekah will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 22°C, colder air in the middle and upper troposphere will keep enough potential instability in the atmosphere to allow for the continued development of thunderstorms.  Since Rebekah is at the center of the larger low pressure system, the vertical wind shear will be less.  Subtropical storm Rebekah may intensify during the next day or so and it could make a transition to a tropical storm.

Subtropical Storm Rebekah will move eastward along with the larger low pressure system that surrounds the much smaller subtropical storm.  Southerly winds blowing around the eastern side of the larger low could push Rebekah toward the north at times.  On its anticipated track Subtropical Storm Rebekah could approach the western Azores on Friday.

Pablo Strengthens into a Hurricane Northeast of the Azores

Former Tropical Storm Pablo strengthened into a hurricane northeast of the Azores on Sunday.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Hurricane Pablo was located at latitude 42.8°N and longitude 18.3°W which put it about 535 miles (865 km) northeast of Lajes, Azores.  Pablo was moving toward the north-northeast at 32 m.p.h. (52 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 983 mb.

Thunderstorms around the eye of former Tropical Storm Pablo strengthened on Sunday morning and Pablo intensified into a hurricane.  The circulation around Hurricane Pablo was still small.  Winds to hurricane force extended out about 10 miles (15 km) from the center of circulation.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Pablo.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 80 miles (130 km) from the center.

Hurricane Pablo was moving over water where the Sea Surface Temperature was near 18°C.  Water that cold would not normally contain enough energy to support a hurricane.  However the temperature of the air in the middle and upper troposphere is cold enough to allow for potential instability.  Convergence around the center of Hurricane Pablo generated enough rising motion to produce thunderstorms with tall, cold clouds tops around the eye at the center of the hurricane.  Enough water vapor condensed in the thunderstorms to produce a warm core which made Pablo a tropical cyclone.

Even though Hurricane Pablo is over Sea Surface Temperatures that would normal cause a hurricane to weak, Pablo could strengthen a little more during the next 12 hours.  It will move through a region where there is not a lot of vertical wind shear.  A larger low pressure system west of Pablo is likely to absorb the hurricane in a day or so.

Hurricane Pablo will move around the eastern side of the larger low pressure system.  The low will steer Pablo toward the north during the next 12 hours.  The larger low will turn Pablo toward the northwest on Monday.  On its anticipated track Hurricane Pablo is forecast to remain southwest of Ireland.

Tropical Storm Olga Develops over Gulf of Mexico, Pablo near the Azores

Tropical Storm Olga developed over the Gulf of Mexico and Tropical Storm Pablo formed near the Azores on Friday afternoon.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Olga was located at latitude 26.3°N and longitude 93.2°W which put it about 260 miles (420 km) south of Lake Charles, Louisiana.  Olga was moving toward the north-northeast at 18 m.p.h. (30 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 998 mb.

A reconnaissance plane found that former Tropical Depression Seventeen had strengthened by Friday afternoon and the National Hurricane center designated the system as Tropical Storm Olga.  More thunderstorms developed near the center of Olga and the plane found that the minimum surface pressure had decreased to 998 mb.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were also developing around the tropical storm.  The strongest rainbands were in the eastern half of the circulation.  Bands in the western half of the circulation consisted of more showers and lower clouds.  Storms near the center were generating upper level divergence which was pumping mass away to the northeast of Tropical Storm Olga.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 90 miles (145 km) from the center of circulation in the northeastern quadrant of Olga.

Tropical Storm Olga could strengthen a little more during the next 12 hours.  Olga will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  An upper level trough over the south central U.S. and Mexico will produce southwesterly winds which will blow toward the top of the circulationn. Those winds will produce moderate vertical wind shear, which will inhibit intensification.  However, the shear will not be strong enough to prevent intensification while the Olga is over the Gulf of Mexico.  The wind shear will cause Tropical Storm Olga to start a transition to an extratropical cyclone.  A cold front will move toward Olga from the northwest and the tropical storm could merge with the front during the next 24 hours.

The upper level trough will steer Tropical Storm Olga toward the north during the next several days. On its anticipated track Olga will make landfall on the coast of Louisiana during Friday night.  Tropical Storm Olga will bring  gusty winds to coastal Louisiana. Olga is likely to drop heavy rain over parts of Louisiana, Mississippi, and eastern Arkansas. The rain could cause floods in some locations.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, visible satellite images revealed that a tiny tropical storm had developed at the center of a much larger low pressure system west of the Azores on Friday afternoon.  The National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Storm Pablo.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Pablo was located at latitude 35.8°N and longitude 32.2°W which put it about 325 miles (525 km) west-southwest of the Azores.  Pablo was moving toward the east-southeast at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 990 mb.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 35 miles (55 km) from the center of Tropical Storm Pablo.

Hurricane Lorenzo Brings Wind and Rain to the Azores

Hurricane Lorenzo brought wind and rain to the Azores on Tuesday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Hurricane Lorenzo was located at latitude 39.1°N and longitude 32.7°W which put it about 85 miles (135 km) west-southwest of Flores Island, Azores.  Lorenzo was moving toward the northeast at 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 120 m.p.h. (195 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 960 mb.

Hurricane Warnings were in effect for the western and central Azores including Flores, Corvo, Faial, Pico, Sao Jorge, Graciosa and Terceira. Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the eastern Azores including Sao Miguel and Santa Maria.

Although Hurricane Lorenzo moved into a more extratropical environment, it remained a large and powerful hurricane.  Winds to hurricane force extended out 150 miles (240 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 390 miles (630 km) from the center.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Hurricane Lorenzo was 16.5.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 50.2 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 66.7.  The radius of hurricane force winds was larger in Hurricane Lorenzo than it was in Hurricane Sandy in 2012.  The overall size of Hurricane Lorenzo was similar to the size of Hurricane Sandy.

Hurricane Lorenzo will move into an extratropical environment during the next several days.  Lorenzo will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is colder than 24°C.  An upper level trough over the north Atlantic Ocean will produce southwesterly winds which will blow toward the top of the circulation.  Those winds will cause strong vertical wind shear.  The colder water and strong shear will cause Hurricane Lorenzo to weaken gradually.  The cooler, more strongly sheared environment will also cause Hurricane Lorenzo to make a transition into a strong extratropical cyclone during the next 48 hours.

The upper level trough will steer Hurricane Lorenzo rapidly toward the northeast during the next 24 to 36 hours.  Lorenzo will turn more toward the east later on Thursday.  On its anticipated track Hurricane Lorenzo will bring strong winds, large waves and heavy rain to the Azores on Wednesday.  Lorenzo will be capable of causing extensive serious damage.  The extratropically transitioned Hurricane Lorenzo could approach Ireland and the United Kingdom on Thursday night and Friday.

Lorenzo Rapidly Strengthens Into a Major Hurricane

Hurricane Lorenzo rapidly strengthened into a major hurricane west of the Cabo Verde Islands on Thursday.  At 6:00 a.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Hurricane Lorenzo was located at latitude 15.2°N and longitude 39.3°W which put it about 995 miles (1600 km) west of the Cabo Verde Islands.  Lorenzo was moving toward the west-northwest at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 125 m.p.h. (200 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 150 m.p.h. (240 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 955 mb.

Lorenzo was a large well organized a hurricane.  There was a circular eye at the center of circulation.  The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hurricane Lorenzo.  Storms around the core were generating strong upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the hurricane.  Winds to hurricane force extended out about 35 miles (55 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 210 miles (335 km) from the center.

Hurricane Lorenzo will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next day or so.  Lorenzo will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 27°C.  It will move through an area where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Hurricane Lorenzo is likely to strengthen to Category 4 on the Saffir-Simpson Scale during the next 24 hours.  Lorenzo will move over cooler water during the weekend, which will cause the hurricane to weaken.

Hurricane Lorenzo will move around the western end of a ridge of high pressure over North Africa and the eastern Atlantic Ocean.  The ridge will steer Lorenzo toward the north during the weekend.  On its anticipated track Hurricane Lorenzo could approach the Azores next week.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean Tropical Storm Karen moved farther away from Puerto Rico.  At 5:00 a.m. EDT in Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Karen was located at latitude 25.5°N and longitude 63.5°W which put it about 520 miles (835 km) north-northeast of San Juan Puerto Rico.  Karen was moving toward the north-northeast at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1004 mb.

Tropical Storm Chantal Forms Southeast of Nova Scotia

Tropical Storm Chantal formed southeast of Nova Scotia on Tuesday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Storm Chantal was located at latitude 40.2°N and longitude 56.2°W which put it about 485 miles (780 km) southeast of Halifax, Nova Scotia.  Chantal was moving toward the east at 22 m.p.h. (35 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1010 mb.

A small low pressure system that was near the coast of the Carolinas during the weekend began to exhibit tropical characteristics on Tuesday night and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Storm Chantal.  Thunderstorms developed closer to the center of circulation when the low moved near the Gulf Stream and the strongest winds were occurring closer to the center.  Although the circulation around Chantal looked more tropical, the distribution of thunderstorms was still asymmetrical.  Many of the stronger storms were occurring in the eastern half of the circulation.  Bands in the western half of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.  Tropical Storm Chantal was far enough north that it was in the region of westerly winds in the upper levels.  Those winds were causing moderate vertical wind shear and they were the primary reason for the asymmetrical distribution of thunderstorms.

Tropical Storm Chantal will move through an environment only marginally favorable for intensification during the next several days.  Chantal will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 25°C.  It will continue to be in a region of moderate westerly winds in the upper levels, which will cause vertical wind shear.  Tropical Storm Chantal could intensify slowly if the upper level winds do not get any stronger.  However, Chantal could weaken if the upper level winds do get stronger.

Tropical Storm Chantal will move around the northern end of a ridge in the middle troposphere over the Atlantic Ocean.  The ridge will steer Chantal toward the east during the next 24 hours.  Chantal could move more toward the southeast on Thursday when it nears the western end of the ridge.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Chantal is forecast to make a slow loop in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean.

Oscar Strengthens Into a Hurricane Southeast of Bermuda

One time subtropical storm and former Tropical Storm Oscar strengthened into a hurricane southeast of Bermuda on Sunday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Hurricane Oscar was located at latitude 25.7°N and longitude 55.5°W which put it about 725 miles (1165 km) southeast of Bermuda.  Oscar was moving toward the west at 16 m.p.h. (26 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 989 mb.

A small eye formed at the center of former Tropical Storm Oscar and the National Hurricane Center upgraded Oscar to a hurricane.  A thin ring of thunderstorms surrounded the eye and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Several short bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hurricane Oscar.  Storms near the core were generating upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the hurricane.

The circulation around Hurricane Oscar is relatively small.  Winds to hurricane force extend out only about 20 miles (30 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extend out about 115 miles (185 km) from the center.

Hurricane Oscar will move through an environment favorable for intensification for another day or two.  Oscar will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 27°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Because of its relatively small circulation, Hurricane Oscar could intensify rapidly while it is in a favorable environment.  Oscar will get stronger during the next 36 to 48 hours and some models are forecasting that it will become a major hurricane.  An upper level trough moving off the East Coast of the U.S. will produce southwesterly winds which will cause the vertical wind shear to increase by Wednesday.

Hurricane Oscar will move around the western end of a ridge of high pressure over the Atlantic Ocean on Monday and Tuesday.  The ridge will steer Oscar toward the west for another 12 to 24 hours.  Hurricane Oscar will move more toward the north when it reaches the western end of the ridge.  On its anticipated track Hurricane Oscar will pass east of Bermuda on Tuesday.  The upper level trough will steer Oscar rapidly toward the northeast on Wednesday.

Oscar Transitions to a Tropical Storm

Former Subtropical Storm Oscar transitioned to a tropical storm on Saturday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Oscar was located at latitude 25.7°N and longitude 51.4°W which put it about 930 miles (1495 km) east-southeast of Bermuda.  Oscar was moving toward the west-southwest at 20 m.p.h. (32 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 994 mb.

The structure of the circulation of former Subtropical Storm Oscar changed to a shape more like a tropical cyclone and the National Hurricane Center reclassified Oscar as a tropical storm.  A band of showers and thunderstorms wrapped more tightly around the eastern side of the center of circulation.  The strongest winds were occurring about 30 miles (50 km) from the center.  Other bands of showers and thunderstorms were starting to form in the eastern half of the circulation.

Tropical Storm Oscar will move through an environment somewhat favorable for intensification during the next 36 hours.  Oscar will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 27°C.  An upper level low southeast of Oscar will produce northerly winds which will blow toward the top of the tropical storm.  However, the core of Tropical Storm Oscar will remain south of the strongest upper level winds on Sunday.  Tropical Storm Oscar could intensify into a hurricane by Monday.

The upper level low is steering Tropical Storm Oscar quickly toward the west-southwest.  That motion is forecast to continue for anther 24 hours.  A large upper level trough over the eastern U.S.  will produce southwesterly winds which will start to turn Oscar toward the northeast in about 36 to 48 hours.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Oscar could be southeast of Bermuda on Monday night.

Leslie Strengthens Into a Hurricane East of Bermuda

Former Tropical Storm Leslie strengthened into a hurricane east of Bermuda on Wednesday morning.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Hurricane Leslie was located at latitude 29.5°N and longitude 56.8°W which put it about 510 miles (825 km) east-southeast of Bermuda.  Leslie was nearly stationary.  The maximum sustained wind speed was 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 95 m.p.h. (155 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 975 mb.

After being designated as a subtropical storm, Hurricane Leslie made a transition to an extratropical cyclone and then back to a subtropical storm.  Leslie eventually moved over warmer water and the structure changed to that of a tropical storm, which intensified slowly until it reached hurricane intensity earlier this morning.  It is gradually exhibiting the classical appearance and structure of a hurricane.

There is a circular eye at the center of circulation.  A nearly complete ring of thunderstorms surrounds the eye and the strongest winds are occurring in that ring of storms.  Several bands of showers and thunderstorms are revolving around the core of Hurricane Leslie.  Storms near the core are generating upper level divergence which is pumping mass away from the hurricane, which is causing the surface pressure to decrease.  Winds to hurricane force extend out about 35 miles (55 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extend out about 230 miles (370 km) from the center.

Hurricane Leslie will remain in an environment favorable for intensification for another day or two.  Leslie will remain over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 27.5°C.  it will be in a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Hurricane Leslie is likely to get a little stronger during the next day or so.  Leslie will move over cooler water later this week and it will start to weaken when that happens.

Hurricane Leslie has been in an area where the steering winds were weak which is why it has meandered east of Bermuda during the past few days.  A subtropical ridge southeast of Leslie will strengthen during the next day or two and the ridge will start to steer the hurricane toward the north.  On its anticipated track Hurricane Leslie will move farther away from Bermuda later this week.