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Hurricane Iota Drops Heavy Rain over Nicaragua and Honduras

Hurricane Iota was dropping heavy rain over Nicaragua and Honduras on Tuesday morning. At 10:00 a.m. EST on Tuesday the center of Hurricane Iota was located at latitude 13.7°N and longitude 85.2°W which put it about 135 miles (220 km) east of Tegucigapla, Honduras. Iota was moving toward the west at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 980 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Bluefields, Nicaragua to the Honduras/Guatemala border including the Bay Islands.

Hurricane Iota continued to move steadily inland over Nicaragua on Tuesday morning. The center of Iota was just to the east of the border between Nicaragua and Honduras. Hurricane Iota was dropping heavy rain over much of Nicaragua and Honduras. Bands of showers and thunderstorms continued to revolve around the center of Iota. Those rainbands were dropping rain fast enough to cause flash floods over many of the same places that were flooded by Hurricane Eta.

Hurricane Iota will continue to move westward during the next 24 to 36 hours. Iota will weaken to a tropical storm when its center moves over Honduras during the next few hours. Iota will likely be a tropical depression when the center reaches El Salvador on Tuesday night. Even though Hurricane Iota will weaken steadily, it will continue to drop heavy rain over Nicaragua, Honduras and El Salvador. Catastrophic flash floods could occur in that region.

Dangerous Hurricane Iota Hits Nicaragua

Dangerous Hurricane Iota hit Nicaragua with powerful winds and heavy rain on Monday night. At 10:00 p.m. EST on Monday the center of Hurricane Iota was located at latitude 13.6°N and longitude 83.4°W which put it about 30 miles (50 km) south of Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua. Iota was moving toward the west at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 155 m.p.h. (250 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 185 m.p.h. (300 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 920 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Sandy Bay Sirpi, Nicaragua to Punta Patuca, Honduras. Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the portions of the coast from Bluefields to Sandy Bay Sirpi, Nicaragua and from Punta Patuca to the Honduras/Guatemala border including the Bay Islands. Tropical Storm Warnings were also in effect for San Andres and Providencia Island.

Hurricane Iota was a powerful hurricane when it made landfall on the coast of Nicaragua just to the south of Puerto Cabezas. Iota was at Category 4 on the Saffir-Simpson Scale. Winds to hurricane force extended out 45 miles (75 km) from the center of circulation. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 175 miles (280 km) from the center, The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Hurricane Iota was 33.3. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 16.3 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 49.6. Iota was capable of causing regional significant damage.

Hurricane Iota made landfall on the same portion of the coast of Nicaragua devastated by Hurricane Eta two weeks ago. Iota will compound the damage caused by Eta. Strong winds will cause additional damage and they will destroy temporary shelters erected after Hurricane Eta. The winds blowing water toward the coast could cause a storm surge of up to 20 feet (6 meters) south of Puerto Cabezas.

Hurricane Iota will continue to move toward the west during the next 48 hours. On its anticipated track the center of Iota will move across northern Nicaragua, southern Honduras and El Salvador. The winds around Hurricane Iota will weaken steadily as it moves inland. Iota will drop heavy rain over Nicaragua, Honduras, and El Salvador. The heavy rain will cause flash floods and some floods will occur in the same locations flooded by Hurricane Eta.

Hurricane Iota Rapidly Intensifies to Cat. 5

Hurricane Iota rapidly intensified to Category 5 on the Saffir-Simpson Scale on Monday morning. At 10:00 a.m. EST on Monday the center of Hurricane Iota was located at latitude 13.5°N and longitude 82.0°W which put it about 100 miles (160 km) east-southeast of Cabo Gracias a Dios. Iota was moving toward the west at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 160 m.p.h. (260 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 190 m.p.h. (305 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 917 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Sandy Bay Sirpi, Nicaragua to Punta Patuca, Honduras and for Providencia Island. A Hurricane Watch was in effect for San Andres. Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the portions of the coast from Bluefields to Sandy Bay Sirpi, Nicaragua and from Punta Patuca to the Honduras/Guatemala border including the Bay Islands. A Tropical Storm Warning was also in effect for San Andres.

Hurricane Iota intensified very rapidly on Sunday night and it reached Category 5 on the Saffir-Simpson Scale on Monday morning. A reconnaissance aircraft found a circular eye with a diameter of 14 miles (22 km) at the center of Iota. The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hurricane Iota. Storms near the core generated strong upper level divergence which pumped mass away from the hurricane in all directions. The removal of large quantities of mass allowed the surface pressure to decrease rapidly which produced the very rapid intensification.

Winds to hurricane force extended out 35 miles (55 km) from the center of Hurricane Iota. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 150 miles (240 km) from the center. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Hurricane Iota was 35.0. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 13.9 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 48.9. Hurricane Iota was capable of causing catastrophic damage.

Hurricane Iota will move through an capable of supporting a very intense hurricane on Monday. Iota will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C. It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear. If the inner end of a rainband wraps around the existing eye and eyewall, then an eyewall replacement cycle could begin. An eyewall replacement cycle could cause Hurricane Iota to start to weaken, but Iota could still be at Category 5 when it makes landfall on the northern coast of Nicaragua.

Hurricane Iota will move south of a high pressure system over the western Atlantic Ocean. The high will steer Iota toward the west during the next several days. On its anticipated track Iota could approach the coast a little to the south of the border between Nicaragua and Honduras on Monday night. Hurricane Iota will be a major hurricane when it reaches the coast and it could be at Category 5. Nicaragua and Honduras are still trying to cope with floods and other damage caused by Hurricane Eta. Another major hurricane could have catastrophic consequences for that region.

Hurricane Iota Rapidly Intensifies East of Nicaragua

Hurricane Iota rapidly intensified east of Nicaragua on Sunday morning. At 10:00 a.m. EST on Sunday the center of Hurricane Iota was located at latitude 13.2°N and longitude 77.8°W which put it about 380 miles (615 km) east-southeast of Cabo Gracias a Dios. Iota was moving toward the west-northwest at 6 m.p.h. (10 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 982 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Sandy Bay Sirpi, Nicaragua to Punta Patuca, Honduras and for Providencia Island. A Hurricane Watch was in effect for San Andres. Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the portions of the coast from Bluefields to Sandy Bay Sirpi, Nicaragua and from Punta Patuca to Punta Castilla, Honduras. A Tropical Storm Warning was also in effect for San Andres.

Hurricane Iota was intensifying rapidly on Sunday morning. A small eye formed at the center of Iota. The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hurricane Iota. Storms near the core generated strong upper level divergence which pumped mass away from the hurricane. The removal of mass caused the surface pressure to decrease quickly, which contributed to the rapid intensification. Winds to hurricane force extended out 30 miles from the center of circulation. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 90 miles from the center.

Hurricane Iota will move through an environment very favorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. Iota will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C. It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear. Hurricane Iota is likely to continue to intensify rapidly. Iota could strengthen into a major hurricane within 24 hours and it could intensify to Category 4 on the Saffir-Simpson Scale.

Hurricane Iota will move south of a high pressure system over the western Atlantic Ocean. The high will steer Iota toward the west during the next several days. On its anticipated track Iota could approach the coast near the border between Nicaragua and Honduras on Monday night. Hurricane Iota is likely be a major hurricane when it reaches the coast. Nicaragua and Honduras are still trying to cope with floods and other damage caused by Hurricane Eta a few days ago. Another major hurricane could have catastrophic consequences for that region.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, former Tropical Storm Theta weakened to a tropical depression southwest of Madeira. At 7:00 a.m. EST on Sunday the center of Tropical Depression Theta was located at latitude 31.8°N and longitude 18.3°W which put it about 120 miles (195 km) southwest of Madeira. Theta was moving toward the east at 3 m.p.h. (5 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1003 mb.

Tropical Storm Iota Strengthens, Hurricane Watches for Nicaragua and Honduras

Tropical Storm Iota strengthened on Saturday and Hurricane Watches were issued for the coasts of Nicaragua and Honduras. At 1:00 p.m. EST on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Iota was located at latitude 12.6°N and longitude 76.4°W which put it about 485 miles (780 km) east-southeast of Cabo Gracias a Dios. Iota was moving toward the west-southwest at 5 m.p.h. (8 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb.

A Hurricane Watch was issued for the portion of the coast from Sandy Bay Sirpi, Nicaragua to Punta Patuca, Honduras and for Providencia Island. Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for San Andres and Providencia Island. A Tropical Storm Watch was issued for the portion of the coast from Punta Patuca to Punta Castilla, Honduras.

A U.S. Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter plane found on Saturday afternoon that Tropical Storm Iota had strengthened. The maximum sustained wind speed had increased to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and the minimum surface pressure had decreased to 1002 mb. The circulation around Tropical Storm Iota was still organizing. Many of the stronger thunderstorms were occurring in bands on the eastern side of Iota. Bands in the western side of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 90 miles (145 km) in the eastern half of Iota. Most of the winds on the western side of the circulation were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Iota will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 48 hours. Iota will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C. An upper level trough over the western Caribbean Sea has been producing southwesterly winds which were blowing toward the top of Iota. The upper level trough will move westward away from Tropical Storm Iota and the wind shear will decrease on Sunday. Iota is likely to strengthen more rapidly after an inner core is formed. Tropical Storm Iota could rapidly intensify into a hurricane on Sunday and it could strengthen to a major hurricane on Monday.

Tropical Storm Iota will move south of a high pressure system over the western Atlantic Ocean. The high will steer Iota toward the west during the next several days. On its anticipated track Iota could approach the coast of Nicaragua on Monday. It will likely be a hurricane at that time and it could be a major hurricane. Nicaragua and Honduras are still trying to cope with floods and other damage caused by Hurricane Eta a few days ago. Another hurricane could have catastrophic consequences for that region.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, Tropical Storm Theta moved toward Madeira. At 10:00 a.m. EST on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Theta was located at latitude 31.6°N and longitude 20.2°W which put it about 210 miles (340 km) west-southwest of Madeira. Theta was moving toward the east at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1000 mb.

TD 31 Strengthens to Tropical Storm Iota

Former Tropical Depression Thirtyone strengthened to Tropical Storm Iota on Friday afternoon. At 4:00 p.m. EST on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Iota was located at latitude 13.8°N and longitude 73.8°W which put it about 335 miles (540 km) south-southeast of Kingston, Jamaica. Iota was moving toward the west-southwest at 3 m.p.h. (5 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1006 mb.

The low level circulation around former Tropical Depression Thirtyone appeared to reform a little farther to the southeast near a band of showers and thunderstorms on Friday afternoon. Based on data from satellites the National Hurricane Center upgraded the depression to Tropical Storm Iota. The circulation around Iota was still organizing. A band of thunderstorms wrapped about three quarters of the way around the center of circulation on the southern, eastern and northern sides of the center. Other bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the center of the Tropical Storm Iota. Storms near the center generated upper level divergence which pumped mass away to the north and east of the tropical storm. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 100 miles (160 km) on the eastern side of Iota. The winds on the western side of Iota were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Iota will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the weekend. Iota will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C. An upper level trough over the western Caribbean Sea will produce southwesterly winds which blow toward the top of Iota during the next 12 hours. Those winds will cause vertical wind shear, but the shear will not be strong enough to prevent Tropical Storm Iota from becoming more organized. The upper level trough will move westward away from the depression and the wind shear will decrease during the weekend. Tropical Storm Iota is likely to strengthen more rapidly after an inner core is formed. Iota could rapidly intensify into a hurricane on Saturday and it could strengthen to a major hurricane by Sunday.

Tropical Storm Iota will move south of a high pressure system over the western Atlantic Ocean. The high will steer Iota toward the west during the next several days. On its anticipated track Iota could approach the coast of Nicaragua on Sunday. It will likely be a hurricane at that time and it could be a major hurricane. Nicaragua and Honduras are still trying to cope with floods and other damage caused by Hurricane Eta a few days ago. Another hurricane could have catastrophic consequences for that region.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, Tropical Storm Theta Passed south of the Azores. At 4:00 p.m. EST on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Theta was located at latitude 31.9°N and longitude 22.6°W which put it about 490 miles (785 km) south-southeast of the Azores. Theta was moving toward the east at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 993 mb.

Tropical Depression 31 Forms over Caribbean Sea

Tropical Depression Thirtyone formed over the Caribbean Sea on Friday morning. At 10:00 a.m. EST on Friday the center of Tropical Depression Thirtyone was located at latitude 14.2°N and longitude 74.3°W which put it about 310 miles (500 km) south-southeast of Kingtson, Jamaica. The depression was moving toward the west-southwest at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1007 mb.

The circulation around an area of low pressure over the Caribbean Sea exhibited much better organization on visible satellite imagery on Friday morning and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Depression Thirtyone. A band of thunderstorms wrapped about three quarters of the way around the center of circulation on the southern, eastern and northern sides of the center. Other bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the center of the depression. Storms near the center generated upper level divergence which pumped mass away to the north and east of the depression.

Tropical Depression Thirtyone will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the weekend. The depression will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C. An upper level trough over the western Caribbean Sea will produce southwesterly winds which blow toward the top of the depression during the next 12 hours. Those winds will cause vertical wind shear, but the shear may not be strong enough to prevent Tropical Depression Thirtyone from strengthening into a tropical storm. The upper level trough will move westward away from the depression and the wind shear will decrease during the weekend. Tropical Depression Thirtyone is likely to strengthen into a tropical storm during the next 12 hours. It could rapidly intensify into a hurricane on Saturday and it could strengthen to a major hurricane by Sunday.

Tropical Depression Thirtyone will move south of a high pressure system over the western Atlantic Ocean. The high will steer the depression toward the west during the next several days. On its anticipated track it could approach the coast of Nicaragua on Sunday. It will likely be a hurricane at that time and it could be a major hurricane. Nicaragua and Honduras are still trying to cope with floods and other damage caused by Hurricane Eta a few days ago. Another hurricane could have catastrophic consequences for that region.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, Tropical Storm Theta Passed south of the Azores and Tropical Storm Eta completed a transition to an extratropical cyclone. At 10:00 a.m. EST on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Theta was located at latitude 31.7°N and longitude 23.8°W which put it about 470 miles (760 km) south-southeast of the Azores. Theta was moving toward the east at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 993 mb.

Potential Redevelopment of Eta Prompts Tropical Storm Watch for Cayman Islands

Potential redevelopment of former Hurricane Eta prompted the issuance of a Tropical Storm Watch for the Cayman Islands. At 4:00 p.m. EST on Thursday the center of Tropical Depression Eta was located at latitude 15.7°N and longitude 87.7°W which put it about 60 miles (95 km) west of La Ceiba, Honduras. Eta was moving toward the north-northwest at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1005 mb.

A Tropical Storm Watch was issued for the Cayman Islands.

The low level center of former Hurricane Eta appeared to move north-northwest across Honduras on Thursday. Mountains in Honduras disrupted the surface circulation around Tropical Depression Eta as the day went on and the center became less distinct. That created more uncertainty about the location and movement of the low level center. There was a cluster of thunderstorms in a band north of Honduras and it was possible that a new center could form near that cluster of storms. Thunderstorms were also dropping heavy rain over Belize in bands located northwest of the apparent low level center of circulation. There were additional reports of flash floods from Honduras and floods could also have occurred in parts of Belize.

Tropical Depression Eta will move around the western end of a ridge of high pressure during the next 12 to 24 hours. The high will steer Eta toward the north during that time. On its anticipated track Tropical Depression Eta will move over the northwestern Caribbean Sea during Thursday night. An upper level trough over the central U.S. will move toward Eta on Friday. The southern end of the trough will make a transition to a cutoff low during the weekend. Counterclockwise rotation around the cutoff low will pull Eta more toward the northeast during the weekend. Eta could pass near the Cayman Islands on Saturday. Eta is likely to move across Cuba on Sunday and it could drop heavy rain when it does so. A Tropical Storm Watch could be issued for part of Cuba at any time. Eta will approach the Florida Keys on Monday and it could bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to the Keys and South Florida.

When Tropical Eta moves over the northwestern Caribbean Sea it will be in an environment somewhat favorable for intensification. Eta will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C. It will initially be under an upper level ridge where the winds are weaker. There will be little vertical wind shear under the ridge and Eta is likely to strengthen back to a tropical storm on Friday. The cutoff low will produce southwesterly winds which will blow toward the top of Eta during the weekend. Those winds will cause more vertical wind shear, which could limit further intensification of Eta. The wind shear could also cause Eta to develop a structure more like a subtropical cyclone, if the shear is stronger.

Tropical Storm Eta Drops Heavy Rain on Nicaragua and Honduras

Tropical Storm Eta dropped heavy rain on Nicaragua and Honduras on Wednesday afternoon. At 4:00 p.m. EST on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Eta was located at latitude 13.9°N and longitude 85.7°W which put it about 100 miles (160 km) east of Tegucigalpa, Honduras. Eta was moving toward the west at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 999 mb.

The wind speeds in former Hurricane Eta decreased steadily on Wednesday as it move farther inland over northern Nicaragua. Eta weakened to a tropical storm, but the storm continued to drop heavy rain over parts of northern Nicaragua and Honduras. There were reports of flash floods in a number of locations. Thunderstorms in bands on the western and northern periphery of Tropical Storm Eta also dropped heavy rain over parts of Belize, Guatemala and Costa Rica. A strong rainband was also over the Caribbean Sea just east of Nicaragua.

Tropical Storm Eta will likely weaken to a tropical depression during Wednesday night. However, Eta will continue to drop locally heavy rain and more flash floods are likely to occur. Tropical Storm Eta will move around the southwestern part of a ridge of high pressure on Thursday. The high will steer Eta toward the west-northwest on Thursday. On its anticipated track Eta will move across Honduras to near the coast of Belize.

A upper level trough east of the Rocky Mountains is forecast to move southeast toward the Gulf of Mexico during the next several days. The southern end of the end of the trough will make a transition into a cutoff low. Counterclockwise circulation around the cutoff low will pull Eta toward the northeast on Friday. When Eta moves over the northwestern Caribbean Sea it will be in an environment somewhat favorable for intensification. Eta will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C. The upper level trough will produce southwesterly winds which will blow toward the top of Eta’s circulation. Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear, but the shear may not be strong enough to prevent intensification. Eta could strengthen back into a tropical storm on Friday night. It is possible that Eta could develop the structure of a subtropical storm if the cutoff low causes enough wind shear to keep it from becoming a tropical storm again.

The counterclockwise rotation around the cutoff low will pull Eta more toward the north during the weekend. Eta is likely to move across Cuba and it could drop heavy rain when it does so. Eta will approach the Florida Keys on Sunday and it could bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to the Keys and South Florida.

Major Hurricane Eta Makes Landfall in Nicaragua

Major Hurricane Eta made landfall on the coast of Nicaragua on Tuesday afternoon. At 4:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday the center of Hurricane Eta was located at latitude 13.8°N and longitude 83.5°W which put it about 15 miles (25 km) south-southwest of Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua. Eta was moving toward the west at 5 m.p.h. (8 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 140 m.p.h. (220 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 165 m.p.h. (265 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 940 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Sandy Bay Sirpi, Nicaragua to the Honduras/Nicaragua border. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from the Honduras/Nicaragua border to Punta Patuca, Honduras.

Hurricane Eta moved very slowly onto the coast of Nicaragua just to south of Puerto Cabezas on Tuesday afternoon. Concentric eyewalls developed around the center of Eta before it made landfall. The start of an eyewall replacement cycle caused the intensity of Hurricane Eta to remain relatively steady as it approached the coast of Nicaragua. An environment favorable for strong hurricanes allowed Eta to continue to be a major hurricane at the time of landfall.

Winds to hurricane force extended out 25 miles (40 km) from the center of Hurricane Eta at the time it made landfall. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 100 miles (160 km) from the center of circulation. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Hurricane Eta was 28.3. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 9.4 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 37.7.

Hurricane Eta was capable of causing significant wind damage. over northeastern Nicaragua. The northern eyewall which contained the strongest winds passed over Puerto Cabezas. Eta could also cause a storm surge of 15 to 18 feet (5 to 6 meters) along the coast near Puerto Cabezas. Hurricane Eta will weaken as it moves slowly inland over northern Nicaragua and the wind speeds will decrease quickly. Eta will drop very heavy rain over northern Nicaragua and Honduras. Some locations could receive 20 to 30 inches (50 to 75 cm). The heavy rain could cause catastrophic flash floods in parts of Nicaragua and Honduras.

Eta will move more toward the northwest on Wednesday and the circulation could emerge over the northwestern Caribbean Sea on Friday. There is a chance that Eta could strengthen back to a tropical storm if the circulation moves back over water. Eta could bring gusty winds and rain to the Florida Keys by Sunday.