Tag Archives: Hong Kong

Tropical Storm Merbok Makes Landfall Near Hong Kong

Tropical Storm Merbok made landfall near Hong Kong on Monday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Storm Merbok was located at latitude 23.5°N and longitude 114.9°E which put it about 55 miles (85 km) north-northeast of Hong Kong.  Merbok was moving toward the north at 11 m.p.h. (17 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1005 mb.

Tropical Storm Merbok intensified before it made landfall and the maximum sustained wind speed was around 55 m.p.h. (85 km/h) at the time of landfall.  Merbok began to weaken after landfall and the strongest winds are now occurring in bands over the the open water.  Merbok is producing locally heavy rain in bands east of the center if circulation.  The heavy rains represent the greatest risk and flooding is possible over parts of eastern China.  Merbok is a fairly small tropical storm and the heavier rain will fall primarily to the east of the track of Merbok.  Merbok should gradually spin down as it moves farther inland.

Tropical Storm Merbok Moves Closer to China

Tropical Depression 04W intensified into Tropical Storm Merbok on Sunday as it moved closer to the coast of China.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Tropical Storm Merbok was located at latitude 19.9°N and longitude 115.7°E which put it about 220 miles (360 km) south-southeast of Hong Kong.  Merbok was moving toward the north-northwest at 16 m.p.h. (26 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 999 mb.

The structure of Tropical Storm Merbok is asymmetrical.  Most of the thunderstorms are occurring east and south of the center of circulation.  A primary rainband curves about halfway around the southeastern side of the center.  Additional bands of showers and thunderstorms exist outside the core in southeastern half of Merbok.  There are bands in the northwestern half of the circulation but they consists primarily of low clouds and showers.  The thunderstorms in the primary rainband are producing upper level divergence which is pumping out mass to the south of Tropical Storm Merbok.

Tropical Storm Merbok is moving through an environment that is marginally favorable for intensification.  It is moving over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  Merbok is moving under the eastern end of an upper level ridge which is producing northerly winds which are blowing toward the top of the tropical storm.  Those northerly winds are creating moderate vertical wind shear, but they are also enhancing the upper level divergence to the south of Merbok.  Tropical Storm Merbok appears to be pulling some drier air from China into the northwestern part of the circulation.  The combination of moderate vertical wind shear and drier air could be the reason for the asymmetrical distribution of thunderstorms.

Tropical Storm Merbok has a chance to intensify a little more before it makes landfall.  The effects of the moderate vertical wind shear and drier air should limit any intensification and Merbok is likely to remain a tropical storm until it makes landfall.

Merbok is moving around the western end of a subtropical ridge which is steering the tropical storm toward the north-northwest.  That general motion is expected to continue for another day or so.  On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Storm Merbok will reach the coast of China between Hong Kong and Shantou in 12 to 18 hours.  Tropical Storm Merbok will bring gust winds and locally heavy rain.  When Merbok moves inland over eastern China, it will reach the westerly winds in the middle latitudes and those winds will turn the tropical storm toward the east.

Tropical Depression 04W Forms West of Luzon

Tropical Depression 04W formed west of Luzon on Saturday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Depression 04W was located at latitude 16.6°N and longitude 116.8°E which put it about 430 miles (690 km) south-southeast of Hong Kong.  The depression was moving toward the northwest at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1006 mb.

An area of thunderstorms moved west-northwestward across the Philippines and a circulation slowly consolidated around a distinct center.  The center of circulation became well enough defined on Saturday to cause the system to be classified as Tropical Depression 04W.  The inner core of the depression is still organizing.  A band of thunderstorms wrapped around the western and southern sides of the center of circulation.  Additional bands of showers and thunderstorms developed in other parts of the depression.  The area of showers and thunderstorms southwest of the center began to generate upper level divergence which pumped mass away from the depression.

Tropical Depression 04W will be moving through an environment that is favorable for intensification.  The depression will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  The depression is moving under the eastern end of an upper level ridge.  The ridge is producing northerly winds which are blowing toward the top of the circulation.  The vertical wind shear may be part of the reason why there are more thunderstorms south of the center of circulation, but the shear is not strong enough to prevent intensification.  Tropical Depression 04W is expected to intensify into a tropical storm during the next 24 hours.

Tropical Depression 04W is moving around the western end of a subtropical ridge which is steering it toward the northwest.  A general northwesterly motion is expected for another 36 to 48 hours.  A turn toward the east will occur after that time.  On its anticipated track Tropical Depression 04W could be near Hong Kong in about 36 hours.  Tropical Depression 04W will have strengthened into a tropical storm by that time and there is a chance it could intensify into a typhoon by the time it nears the coast of China.

Typhoon Haima Brings Gusty Winds and Rain to China

The large eye of Typhoon Haima neared the coast of China on Thursday and the typhoon was bringing gusty winds and heavy rain to the area near Hong Kong.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Typhoon Haima was located at latitude 22.6°N and longitude 115.6°E which put it about 105 miles (170 km) east of Hong Kong.  Haima was moving toward the northwest at 18 m.p.h.  The maximum sustained wind speed was 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 115 m.p.h. (185 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 967 mb.

After the center of Typhoon Haima moved northwest of Luzon, a large eye reformed at the center of the typhoon.  The diameter of the eye is about 60 miles (95 km).  The eye is surrounded by a thin ring of thunderstorms and multiple rainbands.  Haima is a large typhoon.  Winds to typhoon force extend out about 70 miles (110 km) from the center and winds to tropical storm force extend out about 240 miles (390 km) from the center.

Typhoon Haima is moving around the western end of a subtropical ridge which is steering it toward the northwest.  Haima is expected to turn more toward the north when it reaches the coast of China.  An upper level trough over eastern Asia will begin to steer Haima toward the northeast on Friday.  On its anticipated track the eye of Typhoon Haima will make landfall on the coast of China near Haifeng and Lufeng.

The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Haima is 13.9.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) is 27.0 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) is 40.9.  These indices indicate that Typhoon Haima is capable of causing widespread serious wind damage.  Typhoon Haima will also generate a serious storm surge north of where the eye makes landfall and the wind blows the water toward the coast.  Haima will also bring heavy rain and a threat of floods to Guangdong, Jiangxi and Fujian provinces when it moves inland.

Typhoon Haima Producing Strong Winds and Heavy Rain Over Northern Luzon

Typhoon Haima was producing strong winds and heavy rain as it moved across northern Luzon on Wednesday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Typhoon Haima was located at latitude 18.2°N and longitude 120.8°E which put it about 10 miles (15 km) east of Laoag, Philippines.  Haima was moving toward the west-northwest at 20 m.p.h. (32 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 115 m.p.h. (185 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 145 m.p.h. (235 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 946 mb.

The center of Typhoon Haima moved quickly across northern Luzon on Wednesday.  Haima made landfall on northeastern Luzon east of Tuguegarao.  As it moved toward the west-northwest the center of Typhoon Haima passed near Tuao and Dingras.  The center also passed over the Cordillera Central, where it produced very heavy rain in places where the wind was blowing up the slopes of the mountains.

Movement across the mountain ranges in northern Luzon weakened Typhoon Haima and an eye is no longer evident on satellite images.  However, Haima is still a large, powerful typhoon.  Winds to typhoon force extend out 65 miles (105 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extend out about 240 miles (390 km) from the center.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Haima is 20.6.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) is 25.6 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) is 46.2.  The indices indicate that Typhoon Haima is capable of causing widespread major wind damage.

The core of Typhoon Haima is not as well organized as it was before the typhoon made landfall in Luzon.   Some reorganization of the core could occur when Typhoon Haima moves over the South China Sea.  Haima will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  The upper level winds are weak and Typhoon Haima is still producing strong upper level divergence which is pumping mass away in all directions.  Typhoon Haima could restrengthen somewhat or maintain its intensity after the center moves northwest of the Philippines.  When Haima nears the coast of China, it will approach an upper level trough and vertical wind shear will increase.  So, Typhoon Haima is likely to be on a weakening trend when it makes landfall in China.

Typhoon Haima is moving around the western end of subtropical ridge which is steering it toward the west-northwest.  Typhoon Haima is likely to move more toward the northwest after it leaves Luzon and reaches the end of the ridge.  When Typhoon Haima nears the coast of China, it will move under southwesterly winds caused by an upper level trough over China.  Those winds will turn Haima more toward the north.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Haima could make a landfall in China northeast of Hong Kong in about 36 hours.

Typhoon Haima will continue to produce strong winds and heavy rains over parts of northern Luzon for a few more hours until the core of the typhoon moves northwest of that region.  The heavy rain has the potential to cause floods and mudslides.  Although Typhoon Haima is likely to be weakening when it reaches the coast of China, it will still be capable of producing strong winds, heavy rain, floods and a storm surge along the coast.

Typhoon Haima Equal to Cat. 5 Hurricane, Threatens Luzon

Typhoon Haima intensified into the equivalent of a Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale on Tuesday.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Typhoon Haima was located at latitude 15.9°N and longitude 128.4°E which put it about 400 miles (640 km) east of northern Luzon.  Haima was moving toward the west-northwest at 18 m.p.h. (29 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 160 m.p.h. (260 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 195 m.p.h. (315 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 919 mb.

Typhoon Haima completed an eyewall replacement cycle and it intensified as the outer eyewall contracted.  Haima is a very well organized, symmetrical typhoon.  Haima has a clear circular eye surrounded by a ring of very strong thunderstorms.  Thunderstorms in the core of Typhoon Haima are generating strong upper level divergence which is pumping away large quantities of mass in all directions.  Winds to typhoon force extend out about 65 miles (105 km) from the center.

Typhoon Haima is moving through a very favorable environment.  It is moving over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  The upper level winds are weak and there is very little vertical wind shear.  Typhoon Haima is moving on a track that is a little to the north of the track taken by Typhoon Sarika.  This means that the core of Haima is moving north of cooler water mixed to the surface by Typhoon Sarika.  Typhoon Haima could intensify more during the next 12 to 24 hours.  However, if another eyewall replacement cycle occurs, then there could be fluctuations in intensity.

A subtropical ridge is steering Typhoon Haima toward the west-northwest and that general motion is expected to continue for several more days.  On its anticipated track the core of Typhoon Haima will approach northern Luzon in about 24 hours.  After Haima moves across Luzon it will reach the western end of the ridge and turn more toward the northwest.  Typhoon Haima could be near the coast of China in 72 hours.

Haima is an extremely dangerous typhoon.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Haima is 35.0.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) is 21.2 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) is 56.2.  The indices indicate that Typhoon Haima is capable of causing widespread catastrophic wind damage.  In addition Typhoon Haima will produce very heavy rain over northern Luzon including over some locations hit by Typhoon Sarika a few days ago.  The heavy rain will create the potential for flash floods and mudslides.  Haima will also generate a significant storm surge in locations where the wind pushes the water toward the coast.

Typhoon Nida Makes Landfall Near Hong Kong

Typhoon Nida made landfall on Monday near Hong Kong on the coast of China.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Typhoon Nida was located at latitude 22.8°N and longitude 114.4°E which put it about 50 miles (80 km) east-northeast of Hong Kong.  Nida was moving toward the northwest t 13 m.p.h.  The maximum sustained wind speed was 95 m.p.h. (155 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 115 m.p.h. (185 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 963 mb.

Typhoon Nida made landfall on the southeast coast of China just to the north of Hong Kong.  The core of Nida is large and the typhoon is capable of causing wind damage on a regional scale.  Wind blowing toward the coast could also generate a storm surge until Typhoon Nida moves farther inland.  However, very heavy rain and fresh water flooding are much greater risks as Nida moves farther inland over China.

A subtropical ridge north of Nida is steering the typhoon toward the northwest and that general motion is expected to continue for the next several days.  The ridge will steer Nida farther inland over southeastern China.  Typhoon Nida’s fairly slow motion and large size mean that heavy rain could fall over an expansive area.  The risk for flooding will continue as Nida moves inland.

Typhoon Nida Brushes Luzon and Heads for Hong Kong

Typhoon Nida brought wind and rain to northern Luzon on Sunday as it continued to move toward Hong Kong on the coast of China.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Typhoon Nida was located at latitude 20.4°N and longitude 118.3°E which put it about 340 miles (545 km) east-southeast of Hong Kong.  Nida was moving toward the west-northwest at 17 m.p.h. (27 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 974 mb.

The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Nida is 10.4.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) is 13.1 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) is 23.5.  These indices suggest that Typhoon Nida will be capable of causing minor wind damage on a regional scale.

The structure of Typhoon Nida changed significantly on Sunday.  The primary rainband wrapped around the core of the circulation and a very large eye was created at the center.  The diameter of the eye is approximately 50 miles (80 km).  The strongest winds are occurring in the ring of thunderstorms that surrounds the eye.  Other spiral bands of thunderstorms are rotating around the large eye.  The thunderstorms were generating upper level divergence which pumped out mass and allowed the surface pressure to decrease.

Typhoon Nida is in an environment that would favor intensification.  It is moving over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  Easterly winds are blowing in the upper levels, but there is not much vertical wind shear.  The large size of the eye of Nida is the major factor inhibiting intensification.  It takes more energy to increase the wind speed in a large typhoon than it does in a smaller storm.  If the eye contracts, then Typhoon Nida could intensify more before it makes landfall.

A subtropical ridge north of Nida is steering the typhoon toward the west-northwest and that general motion is expected to continue for another day or so.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Nida will be very near Hong Kong in about 24 hours.

As mentioned above, the large size of Typhoon Nida means that it will be capable of causing wind damage on a regional scale.  In addition, Typhoon Nida will be capable of creating a significant storm surge when it moves into the coast of China.  A large slow moving typhoon like Nida will also produce heavy rain and flooding as it moves inland.

Intensifying Tropical Storm Nida Nears Northern Philippines

Tropical Storm Nida intensified on Saturday as it slowly approached the northern portion of Luzon in the Philippines.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT (2100 UTC) the center of of Tropical Storm Nida was located at latitude 16.5°N and longitude 123.8°E which put it about 245 miles (395 km) east-northeast of Manila, Philippines.  Nida was moving toward the west-northwest at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 989 mb.

The circulation of Tropical Storm Nida has become increasingly well organized during the past 24 hours.  A primary rainband wraps about two thirds of the way around the western and southern sides of the center of circulation.  Additional spiral bands of thunderstorms are developing outside the core of the circulation.  Rising motion associated with the convection is generating upper level divergence which is pumping out mass and allowing the surface pressure to decrease.

Tropical Storm Nida is moving through an environment that is very favorable for further intensification.  It is moving over water where the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) is near 31°C.  Nida is beneath an upper level ridge where the upper level winds are light and there is little vertical wind shear.  Very warm SSTs and little wind shear will allow the circulation of Tropical Storm Nida to consolidate further and it should continue to intensify.  Nida could intensify rapidly once an eye starts to form at the center of circulation.  Tropical Storm Nida will move near or over the northeastern part of Luzon.  Interaction with land could slow or temporarily stop the intensification.  However, Tropical Storm Nida should intensify further after it move wests of the Philippines.

A subtropical ridge north of Nida is steering the tropical storm toward the west-northwest and that general motion is expected to continue.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Nida could move over the northern part of Luzon during the next 12 to 24 hours.  Nida could approach the area around Hong Kong as a typhoon in about 48 hours.

The primary threats posed by Tropical Storm Nida to the Philippines are locally heavy rain and flash floods.  Tropical Storm Nida could generate very heavy rain in locations where the circulation causes the wind to blow up the slopes of mountains.  Heavy rain falling on steep terrain in those locations could also cause flash flooding.  Nida could be a typhoon by the time it reaches the part of China near Hong Kong.  Nida will be capable of producing some wind damage and storm surge in addition to heavy rain and flooding when it reaches the coast of China.

Typhoon Linfa Making Landfall East of Hong Kong

The center of Typhoon Linfa is very near the coast of China.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Typhoon Linfa was located at latitude 22.6°N and longitude 116.4°E which put it about 165 miles east of Hong Kong.  Linfa was moving toward the west at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 974 mb.

A mid-level ridge north of Typhoon Linfa is steering it toward the west and that steering pattern is expected to continue in the short term.  On its anticipated track Linfa will move along the coast of China and it could approach Hong Kong in 12 to 18 hours.  Since half of the circulation will be over land and half of the circulation will be over water, Linfa is expected to weaken slowly on Thursday.  It could bring tropical storm force winds and heavy rain to areas near the coast.  Linfa could still be a tropical storm when it moves across Hong Kong.