Tag Archives: Honshu

Tapah Strengthens to a Typhoon Southwest of Japan

Former Tropical Storm Tapah strengthened into a typhoon southwest of Japan on Saturday.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Typhoon Tapah was located at latitude 29.2°N and longitude 125.9°E which put it about 380 miles (610 km) southwest of Nagasaki, Japan.  Tapah was moving toward the north at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 972 mb.

The circulation around Typhoon Tapah was very large.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 250 miles (400 km) from the center of circulation.  There was a large eye with a diameter of 60 miles (95 km) at the center of Typhoon Tapah.  The eye was surrounded by a broken ring of thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the large eye of Tapah.  It appeared on satellite imagery as if some drier air might be wrapping around the southeastern side of the circulation.

Typhoon Tapah will move through an environment that could allow it to maintain its current intensity for another 12 to 24 hours.  Tapah will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  An upper level trough over eastern Asia will produce southwesterly winds which will cause some vertical wind shear, but the shear may not be strong enough to weaken Tapah today.  Typhoon Tapah will move under stronger upper level westerly winds in the middle latitudes on Sunday and the increase in wind shear will weaken the typhoon.  Stronger wind shear and cooler Sea Surface Temperatures will cause Typhoon Tapah to begin a transition into an extratropical cyclone on Sunday.

Typhoon Tapah will move around the western end of a subtropical ridge over the Western North Pacific Ocean during the next 12 to 18 hours.  The ridge will steer Tapah toward the north during that time period.  The stronger westerly winds in the middle latitudes will turn Tapah toward the northeast on Sunday.  On its anticipated track the center of Typhoon Tapah will be west of Kyushu in about 12 to 18 hours.  The center of Tapah could pass between South Korea and Japan on Sunday and then it will move over the Sea of Japan.  Because it has such a large circulation Typhoon Tapah could bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to parts of Kyushu, Honshu and South Korea.

Typhoon Faxai Hits Tokyo

Typhoon Faxai hit Tokyo, Japan on Sunday.  At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Typhoon Faxai was located at latitude 35.3°N and 139.7°E which put it about 30 miles (50 km) south of Tokyo, Japan.  Faxai was moving toward the north-northeast at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 110 m.p.h. (170 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 130 m.p.h. (220 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 959 mb.

The eye of Typhoon Faxai was very near Tokyo and the northern portion of the eyewall may have been over the city.  The strongest winds were in the ring of thunderstorms around the eye.  Winds to typhoon force extended out about 45 miles (75 km) from the center of Typhoon Faxai.  Winds to typhoon force were likely occurring in the Tokyo metropolitan area.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 160 miles (260 km) from the center of Faxai.  Radar operated by the Japan Meteorological Agency indicated that the eyewall and rainbands were dropping heavy rain over the region around Tokyo.  Flash flooding is likely to occur in some locations.

Typhoon Faxai will move northeast across eastern Honshu during the next few hours.  Faxai will be capable of causing serious wind damage while it moves over the region northeast of Tokyo.  Heavy rain is likely to cause flash floods in that area.  Typhoon Faxai will move northeast of Japan on Monday and conditions should improve.

Typhoon Faxai Strengthens to Equivalent of Major Hurricane South of Tokyo

Typhoon Faxai strengthened into the equivalent of a major hurricane south of Tokyo, Japan on Saturday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Typhoon Faxai was located at latitude 31.8°N and longitude 139.7°E which put it about 300 miles (485 km) south of Tokyo, Japan.  Faxai was loving toward the northwest at 18 m.p.h. (30 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 130 m.p.h. (215 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 160 m.p.h. (260 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 944 mb.

Typhoon Faxai intensified rapidly into the equivalent of a major hurricane on Saturday.  There was a small circular eye at the center of circulation.  The eye was surround by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Typhoon Faxai.  Storms near the core were generating upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the typhoon.

The circulation around Typhoon Faxai became more symmetrical on Saturday.  Winds to typhoon force extended out about 40 miles (65 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 140 miles (220 km) from the center.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Faxai was 25.1.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 15.0 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 40.1.  Typhoon Faxai was capable of causing regional major damage.

Typhoon Faxai will move through an environment favorable for powerful typhoons during the next 12 hours.  Faxai will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  It will move under the middle of an upper level ridge where the winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Typhoon Faxai is likely to maintain its intensity during the next 12 hours and it could strengthen a little more.  Typhoon Faxai will reach the coast of Honshu in about 12 hours and Faxai will weaken when it moves over land.  Faxai will move under the westerly winds in the middle latitudes in a day or so and the vertical wind shear will increase when that happens.

Typhoon Faxai will move around the western end of a subtropical high pressure system over the Western North Pacific Ocean.  The high will steer Faxai toward the north during the next 12 to 18 hours.  The high pressure system and the westerly winds in the middle latitude will turn Typhoon Faxai toward the northeast in 18-24 hours.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Faxai will approach the coast of Honshu near Tokyo in about 12 hours.  Faxai will be capable of causing major damage when it reaches Honshu.

Tropical Storm Krosa Brings Wind and Rain to Southwest Japan

Large Tropical Storm Krosa brought wind and rain to parts of southwestern Japan on Wednesday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Krosa was located at latitude 33.2°N and longitude 132.9°E which put it about 20 miles (30 km) south-southwest of Uwajima, Japan.  Krosa was moving toward the north at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 70 m.p.h. (110 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 975 mb.

The center of large Tropical Storm Krosa was near the southwestern coast of Shikoku on Wednesday night.  The strongest winds were blowing in rainbands that were east of the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 260 miles (420 km) from the center of circulation.  The wind was weaker in the western half of Krosa.

Heavy rain was falling on the south facing slopes of Shikoku where the wind was blowing up the slopes.  Heavy rain was also falling on south facing slopes in Wakayama, Mie, Nara and Shiga prefectures in Honshu.  Prolonged heavy rainfall could cause flash floods in some locations.

Tropical Storm Krosa is forecast to move north-northeast across Shikoku and southwestern Honshu.  Krosa will weaken when it moves over land, but it will continue to drop heavy rain over parts of southwestern Japan on Thursday.  A weaker Tropical Storm Krosa is forecast to move over the Sea of Japan later on Thursday.

Large Tropical Storm Krosa Moves Toward Southwest Japan;

Large Tropical Storm Krosa moved toward southwestern Japan on Tuesday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Storm Krosa was located at latitude 28.7°N and longitude 133.4°E which put it about 330 miles (530 km) south of Kochi, Japan.  Krosa was moving toward the northwest at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 965.

The circulation around Tropical Storm Krosa was large.  Krosa has a broad center of circulation which spanned almost 120 miles (195 km).  Several bands of showers and thunderstorms appeared to be consolidating into a broken ring around the broad center.  The strongest winds were occurring in the broken ring.  Other bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the broad center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 265 miles (425 km) from the center of circulation.

Tropical Storm Krosa will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 12 to 24 hours.  Krosa will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28.5°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Tropical Storm Krosa is under an upper level ridge which is enhancing the upper level divergence.  However, the large, broad center of circulation will limit the rate of any intensification.  Krosa could strengthen into a typhoon before it reaches southwestern Japan.

Tropical Storm Krosa is moving around the western end of a subtropical ridge over the Western North Pacific Ocean.  Krosa will move more toward the north when it reaches the western end of the ridge.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Krosa could reach southwestern Japan within 18 to 24 hours.  Krosa could be a typhoon by that time.  Tropical Storm Krosa will bring gusty winds and heavy rain to parts of Kyushu, Shikoku, and western Honshu.  Heavy rain is likely to cause flooding in some location, especially in areas with steeper slopes.

Typhoon Francisco Brings Wind and Rain to Kyushu

Typhoon Francisco brought wind and rain to Kyushu on Monday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Typhoon Francisco was located at latitude 32.2°N and longitude 131.4°E which put it about 20 miles (35 km) north of Miyazaki, Japan.  Francisco was moving toward the west-northwest at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 969 mb.

Typhoon Francisco strengthened on Monday as it neared the coast of Kyushu.  A small eye developed at the center of circulation.  A ring of strong thunderstorms surrounded the eye and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Several bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Typhoon Francisco.  The stronger bands were primarily in the eastern half of the circulation.

The core of Typhoon Francisco made landfall on Kyushu just to the north of Miyazaki.  Typhoon Francisco will bring very heavy rain and strong gusty winds to much of Kyushu.  Francisco is forecast to turn toward the northwest and the center of circulation will move across the middle of Kyushu.  Locally heavy rain falling on steep terrain will create the potential for serious flash flooding in some locations.  Rainbands in the eastern half of Typhoon Francisco will also drop locally heavy rain over parts of western Shikoku and western Honshu.

Typhoon Francisco will weaken when it moves across Honshu, but then it will move over the Korea Strait and make another landfall in South Korea.  Francisco will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to parts of southern South Korea on Tuesday.

Elsewhere over the Western North Pacific Ocean, Tropical Storm Lekima continue to meander east of Luzon.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Storm Lekima was located at latitude 18.7° and longitude 129.3°E which put it about 670 miles (1085 km) south-southeast of Taipei, Taiwan.  Lekima was moving toward the southwest at 6 m.p.h. (10 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 990 mb.

Tropical Storm Nari Drops Heavy Rain on Honshu

Tropical Storm Nari dropped locally heavy rain and producing gusty winds on Honshu on Friday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Nari was located at latitude 35.2°N and longitude 137.0°E which put it about 10 miles (15 km) east of Nagoya, Japan.  Nari was moving toward the north-northeast at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1000 mb.

Tropical Storm Nari was dropping locally heavy rain over parts of central Honshu.  The heaviest rain was falling in bands located in the western half of the circulation.  Heavier rain was falling in the area between Nagoya, Osaka and Kyoto.  Bands of heavier rain were also falling north of Nagoya.  Most of the bands in the eastern half of Tropical Storm Nari consisted primarily lighter showers and lower clouds.  The heavier rain could produce flash flooding in some locations.

Tropical Storm Nari will move more toward the east-northeast on Saturday.  The center of Nari is forecast to pass north of Tokyo.  Tropical Storm Nari will continue to drop locally heavy rain over central and eastern Honshu when it moves over those locations.

Tropical Storm Nari Develops South of Japan

Tropical Storm Nari developed south of Japan on Thursday night.  The Japan Meteorological Agency designated a low pressure system south of Honshu as Tropical Storm Nari when the maximum sustained wind speed reached 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h).  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Nari was located at latitude 30.2°N and longitude 136.9°E which put it about 350 miles (565 km) south of Nagoya, Japan.  Nari was moving toward the north at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1000 mb.

The circulation around Tropical Storm Nari exhibited more of a hybrid structure than the structure of a pure tropical cyclone.  Tropical Storm Nari developed when an upper level low pressure system stalled south of the Japan.  A surface circulation formed beneath the upper low and then more thunderstorms formed closer to the center of circulation.  The original upper level low was located southwest of the surface low on Thursday night.  The upper level low was producing southwesterly winds which were blowing across the surface low.  Those winds were creating vertical wind shear.  The circulation around Tropical Storm Nari showed evidence of the effect of that wind shear.  The stronger thunderstorms were in a band that curved around north and west of the center of circulation.  Bands south and east of the center consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.  The wind field around Tropical Storm Nari was also asymmetric.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 115 miles (185 km) to the east of the center of circulation, but only extended out about 60 miles (95 km) to the west of the center.

Tropical Storm Nari will move through an environment only marginally favorable for intensification.  Nari will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  The upper low will continue to cause vertical wind shear, which will inhibit intensification.  The upper low will also pull some drier air around the southern side of the circulation.  Nari could strengthen a little during the next 24 hours if more thunderstorms develop closer to the center of circulation.  Tropical Storm Nari will move under stronger westerly winds in about a day or so.  Those winds will cause more vertical wind shear and they should prevent further intensification.

Tropical Storm Nari will be steered by the interaction of the upper low and a subtropical ridge over the western North Pacific Ocean.  Those two features are likely to steer Nari toward the north during the next 24 hours.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Nari could approach the coast of Honshu near Nagoya in about 24 hours.  Nari will move more toward the east when it reaches the stronger westerly winds in a day or so.  Tropical Storm Nari could bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to central Honshu on Saturday.

Tropical Storm Sepat Forms Near Honshu

Tropical Storm Sepat formed near Honshu on Thursday.  More thunderstorms formed near the center of a low pressure system near the southeast coast of Honshu on Thursday and the Japan Meteorological Agency designated the system as Tropical Storm Sepat.  At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Sepat was located at latitude 32.6°N and longitude 134.7°E which put it about 100 miles (160 km) southwest of Susami, Japan.  Sepat was moving toward the northeast at 32 m.p.h. (50 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 998 mb.

The distribution of thunderstorms around Tropical Storm Sepat was asymmetrical.  The strongest thunderstorms were in several bands south and east of the center of circulation.  Bands in the other parts of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.  Storms southeast of the center of Sepat were generating upper level divergence which was pumping mass away to the northeast of the tropical storm.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 150 miles (240 km) to the east of the center of circulation.

Tropical Storm Sepat will move through an environment marginally favorable for intensification during the next 12 to 24 hours.  Sepat will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 24°C.  An upper level trough west of Japan will produce strong southwesterly winds which will blow toward the top of the circulation.  Those winds will cause moderate vertical wind shear, which is the primary reason for the asymmetrical distribution of thunderstorms.  Moderate vertical wind shear and cooler water will cause the structure of Tropical Storm Sepat to change to that of an extratropical cyclone.  Sepat could strengthen during the extratropical transition because upper level divergence will cause the surface pressure to decrease.

The upper level trough will steer Tropical Storm Sepat rapidly toward the northeast.  On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Storm Sepat will pass near the coast of Honshu.  Sepat will bring gusty winds and it could drop locally heavy rain.

Typhoon Kong-rey Brings Wind and Rain to Okinawa

Typhoon Kong-rey was bringing wind and rain to Okinawa on Wednesday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Typhoon Kong-rey was located at latitude 23.6°N and longitude 127.3°W which put it about 230 miles (375 km) south of Okinawa.  Kong-rey was moving toward the northwest at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 964 mb.

Typhoon Kongrey weakened steadily during Wednesday.  The eye became less distinct on satellite imagery.  The ring of strong thunderstorms around the eye broke and stronger thunderstorms were only occurring to the east of the eye.  It appeared that Typhoon Kong-rey was pulling cooler, drier air into the western half of the circulation and that air was wrapping around the southern half of the typhoon.  Kong-rey may have also moved over some cooler water that was mixed to the surface by Typhoon Trami last week.

The circulation around Typhoon Kong-rey was still large.  Winds to typhoon force extended out about 70 miles (110 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 230 miles (375 km) from the center.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Kong-rey was 11.5.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 24.7 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 36.2.

Typhoon Kong-rey will move around the western end of a subtropical ridge over the Western North Pacific Ocean.  The ridge will steer Kong-rey toward the north during the next 24 to 36 hours.  Typhoon Kong-rey will turn more toward the northeast in about 36 hours.

The outer rainbands on the northern side of Typhoon Kong-rey are already over Okinawa.  Kong-rey will drop heavy rain and it will produce gusty winds over Okinawa and the Ryukyu Islands on Thursday.  The wind and rain will hinder efforts to recover from damage caused by Typhoon Trami.  Typhoon Kong-rey could be southeast of Kyushu in about 36 hours and it could be near South Korea in about 48 hours.  The soil in much of Japan is already near saturation and more heavy rain could cause flash flooding.  Typhoon Kong-rey could also hinder recovery efforts in Kyushu, Shikoku and Honshu.