Tag Archives: Honshu

Typhoon Kong-rey Brings Wind and Rain to Okinawa

Typhoon Kong-rey was bringing wind and rain to Okinawa on Wednesday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Typhoon Kong-rey was located at latitude 23.6°N and longitude 127.3°W which put it about 230 miles (375 km) south of Okinawa.  Kong-rey was moving toward the northwest at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 964 mb.

Typhoon Kongrey weakened steadily during Wednesday.  The eye became less distinct on satellite imagery.  The ring of strong thunderstorms around the eye broke and stronger thunderstorms were only occurring to the east of the eye.  It appeared that Typhoon Kong-rey was pulling cooler, drier air into the western half of the circulation and that air was wrapping around the southern half of the typhoon.  Kong-rey may have also moved over some cooler water that was mixed to the surface by Typhoon Trami last week.

The circulation around Typhoon Kong-rey was still large.  Winds to typhoon force extended out about 70 miles (110 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 230 miles (375 km) from the center.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Kong-rey was 11.5.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 24.7 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 36.2.

Typhoon Kong-rey will move around the western end of a subtropical ridge over the Western North Pacific Ocean.  The ridge will steer Kong-rey toward the north during the next 24 to 36 hours.  Typhoon Kong-rey will turn more toward the northeast in about 36 hours.

The outer rainbands on the northern side of Typhoon Kong-rey are already over Okinawa.  Kong-rey will drop heavy rain and it will produce gusty winds over Okinawa and the Ryukyu Islands on Thursday.  The wind and rain will hinder efforts to recover from damage caused by Typhoon Trami.  Typhoon Kong-rey could be southeast of Kyushu in about 36 hours and it could be near South Korea in about 48 hours.  The soil in much of Japan is already near saturation and more heavy rain could cause flash flooding.  Typhoon Kong-rey could also hinder recovery efforts in Kyushu, Shikoku and Honshu.

Large Typhoon Trami Brings Wind and Rain to Japan

Large Typhoon Trami brought wind and rain to Japan on Saturday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Typhoon Trami was located at latitude 31.8°N and longitude 132.3°E which put it about 140 miles (225 km) southwest of Kochi, Japan.  Trami was moving toward the northeast at 22 m.p.h. (33 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 105 m.p.h. (170 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 125 m.p.h. (200 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 950 mb.

There was still a large eye at the center of Typhoon Trami, but the ring of thunderstorms around the eye was beginning to look a little more ragged.  However, the circulation around Trami was very large.  Winds to typhoon force extended out about 155 miles (250 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 355 miles (575 km) from the center.

The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Trami was 17.8.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 49.6 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 67.4.  Typhoon Trami was capable of causing extensive serious damage.

Typhoon Trami brought strong winds and heavy rain to Okinawa and the northern Ryukyu Islands on Saturday.  There were reports of damage.  The northern eyewall of Trami passed over Kyushu.  Strong winds and heavy rain were falling in that region.  Heavy rain and strong winds will reach Shikoku shortly.  The center of Typhoon Trami could be near Kyoto in about six hours.  Trami will move northeast across Honshu on Sunday.  It will bring heavy rain and gusty winds to much of Japan.  Flash flooding will be possible over much of Japan.

Elsewhere over the Western North Pacific Ocean Tropical Storm Kong-rey was strengthening southeast of the Ryukyu Islands.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Kong-rey was located at latitude 14.1°N and longitude 138.1°E which put it about 1165 miles (1880 km) east of Manila, Philippines.  Kong-rey was moving toward the west-northwest at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 70 m.p.h. (110 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 983 mb.

Large Typhoon Trami Nears Okinawa

Large Typhoon Trami neared Okinawa late on Friday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Typhoon Trami was located at latitude 25.1°N and longitude 126.9°E which put it about 135 miles (225 km) south-southwest of Okinawa.  Trami was moving toward the northwest at 6 m.p.h.  The maximum sustained wind speed was 105 m.p.h. (170 km) and there were wind gusts to 125 m.p.h. (200 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 949 mb.

After completing an eyewall replacement cycle over a day ago that left it weaker, but larger, Typhoon Trami has been in a relatively steady state.  There is a very large eye with a diameter of almost 100 miles (160 km) at the center of circulation.  The eye is surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds are occurring in that ring of storms.  Several bands of showers and thunderstorms are revolving around the large eye.

The circulation around Typhoon Trami is large.  Winds to typhoon force extend out about 75 miles (120 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extend out about 235 miles (380 km) from the center.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Trami is 17.8.  Th Hurricane Size Index (HSI) is 26.9 and the Hurricane Wind intensity Size Index (HWISI) is 44.7.  Those indices indicate that Typhoon Trami is capable of causing widespread serious damage.

Typhoon Trami is already bringing wind and rain to Okinawa and some of the Ryukyu Islands.  The northern eyewall is over Okinawa and the northern part of the large eye will reach it soon.  Trami will bring strong, damaging winds to Okinawa and the northern Ryukyu Islands during the next 24 hours.  It will also drop heavy rain and flash floods could occur.

Typhoon Trami is moving around the western end of a subtropical ridge.  it will start to move more quickly toward the northeast on Sunday.  Trami could reach Shikoku and Honshu in about 48 hours.  Trmai will still be a typhoon when it reaches the larger islands of Japan.

Elsewhere over the Western North Pacific Ocean, Tropical Depression 30W was passing south of Guam.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Depression 30W was located at latitude 11.6°N and longitude 145.7°E which put it about 110 miles (185 km) south-southeast of Guam.  It was moving toward the northwest at 27 m.p.h. (43 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1003 mb.  Tropical Depression 30W is forecast to strengthen and it could take track similar to the path of Typhoon Trami.

Typhoon Trami Moves Slowly Toward Okinawa

Typhoon Trami moved slowly toward Okinawa on Wednesday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Typhoon Trami was located at latitude 21.5°N and longitude 129.1°E which put it about 345 miles (560 km) south of Okinawa.  Trami was moving toward the north at 3 m.p.h. (5 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 105 m.p.h. (170 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 125 m.p.h. (200 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 949 mb.

The structure of Typhoon Trami changed significantly during the past 48 hours.  A second eyewall replacement cycle produced a larger eye and a bigger circulation.  Very slow movement of Typhoon Trami allowed the wind to mix cooler water to the surface.  Cooler water meant that there was less energy in the upper ocean to fuel the circulation.  The combination of the eyewall replacement cycle and cooler water resulted in a reduction of the wind speed and the surface pressure increased.

Although it is not as strong as it was 48 hours ago , Typhoon Trami is still a large powerful typhoon.  Winds to typhoon force extend out about 70 miles (110 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extend out about 225 miles (360 km) from the center.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Trami is 17.8.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) is 24.5 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) is 42.3.  Typhoon Trami is capable of producing widespread serious damage.

Typhoon Trami is likely to weaken slowly while it remains over the cooler water it has mixed to the surface.  When Trami moves north of that water in 12 to 24 hours, it will move into a more favorable environment.  Typhoon Trami will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  It will still be in an area where the upper level winds are not too strong and there will not be much vertical wind shear.  The broad circulation and large eye will prevent rapid intensification, but Typhoon Trami could strengthen on Friday.

Typhoon Trami will still be in area where the steering winds are weak on Thursday.  It will move slowly toward the north during the next 12 to 24 hours.  Eventually a subtropical ridge over the Western North Pacific Ocean will begin to steer Typhoon Trami again.  Typhoon Trami will move toward the north at a faster rate on Friday.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Trami could be near Okinawa by late Friday.  Typhoon Trami could approach Kyushu in about 72 hours and it could move across Honshu during the weekend.

Typhoon Jebi Brings Wind and Rain to Japan

Typhoon Jebi brought wind and rain to Japan on Monday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Typhoon Jebi was located at latitude 33.9°N and longitude 134.4°E which put it about 15 miles (25 km) southwest of Tokushima.  Jebi was moving toward the north-northeast at 25 m.p.h. (40 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 105 m.p.h. (170 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 945 mb.

Typhoon Jebi made landfall over eastern Shikoku on Monday night.  Jebi brought strong winds and dropped heavy rain over Shikoku and Honshu.  It retained about two thirds of an eyewall and the strongest winds were occurring in that partial eyewall.  There was a gap in the eyewall west of the center of circulation.  Several bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Typhoon Jebi.  Winds to typhoon force extended out about 70 miles (110 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 200 miles from the center.

An upper level trough northwest of Japan will steer Typhoon Jebi quickly toward the north-northeast.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Jebi will move quickly across eastern Shikoku.  The center of  Jebi will make landfall on Honshu near Kobe and it will move quickly toward the Sea of Japan.  Typhoon Jebi will drop heavy rain over Kobe, Osaka and Kyoto.  Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some parts of Shikoku and Honshu.  Jebi will weaken when it moves over the cooler water in the Sea of Japan.

Typhoon Jebi Moves Closer to Japan

Typhoon Jebi moved closer to Japan on Sunday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Typhoon Jebi was located at latitude 26.7°N and longitude 133.0°E which put it about 620 miles (1000 km) south of Kyoto, Japan.  Jebi was moving toward the northwest at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 115 m.p.h. (185 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 145 m.p.h. (235 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 940 mb.

The circulation of Typhoon Jebi remained very well organized.  There was a circular eye at the center of circulation.  The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Several bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Typhoon Jebi.  Storms around the core were generating upper level divergence which was pumping mass away toward the northeast of the typhoon.

Winds to typhoon force extended out about 70 miles (110 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 230 miles (370 km) from the center.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Jebi was 20.6.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 24.4 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 45.0.

Typhoon Jebi will move into an environment that will become less favorable for strong typhoons.  Jebi will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  So, there will be enough energy in the upper ocean to maintain the circulation.  However, an upper level trough northwest of Japan will produce southwesterly winds which will blow toward the top of the circulation.  Those winds will produce increasing vertical wind shear.  They will also inhibit the upper level divergence to the south of the typhoon.  Jebi will likely continue to weaken slowly on Monday.

Typhoon Jebi will move around the western end of a ridge over the Western North Pacific Ocean.  Jebi will move toward the north when it rounds the end of the ridge.  The upper level trough northwest of Japan will steer Typhoon Jebi toward the northeast when it nears Japan.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Jebi could approach Shikoku and Honshu in a little over 24 hours.  Jebi is forecast to be a typhoon when it reaches Japan.  It will bring gusty winds and drop locally heavy rain.  The rain will create the potential for flash floods.

Typhoon Jebi Turns Toward Japan

Typhoon Jebi turned toward Japan on Saturday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Typhoon Jebi was located at latitude 23.1°N and longitude 135.4°E which put it about 410 miles (665 km) west-southwest of Iwo To.  Jebi was moving toward the northwest at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 130 m.p.h. (215 km/h) and there wind gusts to 160 m.p.h. (260 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 939 mb.

Typhoon Jebi was nearing the completion of an eyewall replacement cycle on Saturday night.  The original inner eyewall had mostly dissipated, although a portion of the lower part of that eyewall was evident on satellite images.  A large circular eye was present at the center of Typhoon Jebi.  The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Multiple bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Typhoon Jebi.  Storms around the core were generating strong upper level divergence.  Winds to typhoon force extended out about 45 miles (75 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 175 miles (280 km) from the center.

Typhoon Jebi will move through an environment capable of supporting a typhoon during the next 48 hours.  Jebi will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  Typhoon Jebi will move through an area where the upper level winds are relatively weak on Sunday. Jebi will move closer to an upper level trough northwest of Japan on Monday.  Stronger southwesterly winds will cause more vertical wind shear and Typhoon Jebi will start to weaken at that time.

Typhoon Jebi will move around the western end of a subtropical ridge over the Western North Pacific Ocean.  Jebi will turn more toward the north on Sunday.  The upper level trough northwest of Japan will steer Typhoon Jebi more toward the northeast on Monday.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Jebi could approach Shikoku and Honshu in about two days.  Jebi is forecast to be a typhoon when it approaches Japan.

Typhoon Jebi Strengthens to Equivalent of Cat. 5 Hurricane

Powerful Typhoon Jebi strengthened into the equivalent of a Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale on Friday.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Friday the center of Typhoon Jebi was located at latitude 18.8°N and longitude 141.0°E which put it about 400 miles (645 km) south of Iwo To.  Jebi was moving toward the west-northwest at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 175 m.p.h. (280 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 210 m.p.h. (335 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 907 mb.

The circulation of Typhoon Jebi was very well organized and symmetrical.  There was a circular eye at the center of circulation.  The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Numerous bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of the circulation.  Storms near the core were generating strong upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the typhoon in all directions.

Jebi is a large and powerful typhoon.  Winds to typhoon force extended out about 65 miles (105 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 195 miles (315 km) from the center.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Jebi was 40.4.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 21.6 and the Hurricane Wind intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 62.0.

Typhoon Jebi may have reached its maximum intensity.  Microwave satellite imagery suggested that an inner rainband may have wrapped around the existing eye and eyewall.  If that has occurred, then an eyewall replacement cycle may have begun.  An eyewall replacement cycle will cause a typhoon to weaken when the inner eyewall, where the strongest wind are, dissipates.

Typhoon Jebi will move around the western end of a subtropical ridge over the Western North Pacific Ocean.  Jebi will gradually turn toward the north as it moves around the end of the ridge.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Jebi should pass west of Iwo To.  Jebi could be approaching Japan in three days or so.

Typhoon Jebi Hits Northern Marianas

Typhoon Jebi hit the Northern Mariana Islands on Thursday.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Typhoon Jebi was located at latitude 17.8°N and longitude 146.2°E which put it about 35 miles (55 km) east-southeast of Pagan.  Jebi was moving toward the west at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 125 m.p.h. (205 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 155 m.p.h. (230 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 940 mb.  A Typhoon Warning was in effect for Agrihan, Pagan and Alamagan.

Typhoon Jebi was very well organized.  There was a small eye at the center of circulation.  The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Typhoon Jebi.  Storms near the core were generating strong upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the typhoon.

Winds to typhoon force extended out about 50 miles (80 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 185 miles (295 km) from the center.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Jebi was 23.6.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 19.4 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 43.0.  Those indices indicate that Typhoon Jebi was capable of causing major damage.

Typhoon Jebi will be moving through an environment favorable for intensification during the next day or so.  Jebi will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there is little vertical wind shear.  Typhoon Jebi is forecast to intensify during the next 24 hours.  If an outer rainband wraps around the existing eye and eyewall, then an eyewall replacement cycle could cause the typhoon to weaken at least temporarily.

Typhoon Jebi will move around the western end of a subtropical ridge over the Western North Pacific Ocean.  Jebi will make a gradual turn toward the north during the next few days while it moves around the end of the ridge.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Jebi will move slowly away from the Northern Marianas.  Weather conditions should slowly improve when Jebi moves away.  The center of Jebi is forecast to pass south of Iwo To.  Typhoon Jebi could approach Honshu in four or five days.

Typhoon Jebi Intensifies Rapidly East of Northern Marianas

Typhoon Jebi intensified rapidly east of the Northern Marianas on Wednesday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Typhoon Jebi was located at latitude 17.5°N and longitude 149.8°E which put it about 270 miles (435 km) east of Pagan.  Jebi was moving toward the west at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 105 m.p.h. (170 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 125 m.p.h. (205 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 959 mb.  A Typhoon Warning was in effect for Agrihan, Pagan and Alamagan in the Northern Marianas.

The circulation of Typhoon Jebi was very well organized and it was symmetrical.  A small circular eye formed at the center of circulation.  A ring of strong thunderstorms surrounded the eye and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Several bands of thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Typhoon Jebi.  Storms around the core were generating strong upper level divergence which was pumping large quantities of mass away from the typhoon.  Winds to typhoon force extended out about 25 miles (40 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 100 miles (160 km) from the center.

Typhoon Jebi will be moving through an environment very favorable for further intensification.  Jebi will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Jebi is likely to intensify into the equivalent of a major hurricane on Thursday.

Typhoon Jebi will move south of a subtropical ridge over the Western North Pacific for several more days.  The ridge will steer Jebi in a general westerly direction during that time.  Typhoon Jebi will reach the western end of the ridge in about 48 hours.  Jebi will make a gradual turn toward the north when it reaches the end of the ridge.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Jebi will reach the northernmost Mariana Islands within 24 hours.  Jebi will be capable of causing major damage when it arrives.  Jebi is forecast to pass south of Iwo To, but it will turn toward the major islands of Japan during the weekend.