Tag Archives: Kyoto

Large Typhoon Trami Brings Wind and Rain to Japan

Large Typhoon Trami brought wind and rain to Japan on Saturday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Typhoon Trami was located at latitude 31.8°N and longitude 132.3°E which put it about 140 miles (225 km) southwest of Kochi, Japan.  Trami was moving toward the northeast at 22 m.p.h. (33 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 105 m.p.h. (170 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 125 m.p.h. (200 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 950 mb.

There was still a large eye at the center of Typhoon Trami, but the ring of thunderstorms around the eye was beginning to look a little more ragged.  However, the circulation around Trami was very large.  Winds to typhoon force extended out about 155 miles (250 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 355 miles (575 km) from the center.

The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Trami was 17.8.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 49.6 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 67.4.  Typhoon Trami was capable of causing extensive serious damage.

Typhoon Trami brought strong winds and heavy rain to Okinawa and the northern Ryukyu Islands on Saturday.  There were reports of damage.  The northern eyewall of Trami passed over Kyushu.  Strong winds and heavy rain were falling in that region.  Heavy rain and strong winds will reach Shikoku shortly.  The center of Typhoon Trami could be near Kyoto in about six hours.  Trami will move northeast across Honshu on Sunday.  It will bring heavy rain and gusty winds to much of Japan.  Flash flooding will be possible over much of Japan.

Elsewhere over the Western North Pacific Ocean Tropical Storm Kong-rey was strengthening southeast of the Ryukyu Islands.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Kong-rey was located at latitude 14.1°N and longitude 138.1°E which put it about 1165 miles (1880 km) east of Manila, Philippines.  Kong-rey was moving toward the west-northwest at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 70 m.p.h. (110 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 983 mb.

Typhoon Jebi Brings Wind and Rain to Japan

Typhoon Jebi brought wind and rain to Japan on Monday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Typhoon Jebi was located at latitude 33.9°N and longitude 134.4°E which put it about 15 miles (25 km) southwest of Tokushima.  Jebi was moving toward the north-northeast at 25 m.p.h. (40 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 105 m.p.h. (170 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 945 mb.

Typhoon Jebi made landfall over eastern Shikoku on Monday night.  Jebi brought strong winds and dropped heavy rain over Shikoku and Honshu.  It retained about two thirds of an eyewall and the strongest winds were occurring in that partial eyewall.  There was a gap in the eyewall west of the center of circulation.  Several bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Typhoon Jebi.  Winds to typhoon force extended out about 70 miles (110 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 200 miles from the center.

An upper level trough northwest of Japan will steer Typhoon Jebi quickly toward the north-northeast.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Jebi will move quickly across eastern Shikoku.  The center of  Jebi will make landfall on Honshu near Kobe and it will move quickly toward the Sea of Japan.  Typhoon Jebi will drop heavy rain over Kobe, Osaka and Kyoto.  Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some parts of Shikoku and Honshu.  Jebi will weaken when it moves over the cooler water in the Sea of Japan.

Typhoon Jebi Moves Closer to Japan

Typhoon Jebi moved closer to Japan on Sunday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Typhoon Jebi was located at latitude 26.7°N and longitude 133.0°E which put it about 620 miles (1000 km) south of Kyoto, Japan.  Jebi was moving toward the northwest at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 115 m.p.h. (185 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 145 m.p.h. (235 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 940 mb.

The circulation of Typhoon Jebi remained very well organized.  There was a circular eye at the center of circulation.  The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Several bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Typhoon Jebi.  Storms around the core were generating upper level divergence which was pumping mass away toward the northeast of the typhoon.

Winds to typhoon force extended out about 70 miles (110 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 230 miles (370 km) from the center.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Jebi was 20.6.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 24.4 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 45.0.

Typhoon Jebi will move into an environment that will become less favorable for strong typhoons.  Jebi will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  So, there will be enough energy in the upper ocean to maintain the circulation.  However, an upper level trough northwest of Japan will produce southwesterly winds which will blow toward the top of the circulation.  Those winds will produce increasing vertical wind shear.  They will also inhibit the upper level divergence to the south of the typhoon.  Jebi will likely continue to weaken slowly on Monday.

Typhoon Jebi will move around the western end of a ridge over the Western North Pacific Ocean.  Jebi will move toward the north when it rounds the end of the ridge.  The upper level trough northwest of Japan will steer Typhoon Jebi toward the northeast when it nears Japan.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Jebi could approach Shikoku and Honshu in a little over 24 hours.  Jebi is forecast to be a typhoon when it reaches Japan.  It will bring gusty winds and drop locally heavy rain.  The rain will create the potential for flash floods.

Typhoon Jebi Turns Toward Japan

Typhoon Jebi turned toward Japan on Saturday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Typhoon Jebi was located at latitude 23.1°N and longitude 135.4°E which put it about 410 miles (665 km) west-southwest of Iwo To.  Jebi was moving toward the northwest at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 130 m.p.h. (215 km/h) and there wind gusts to 160 m.p.h. (260 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 939 mb.

Typhoon Jebi was nearing the completion of an eyewall replacement cycle on Saturday night.  The original inner eyewall had mostly dissipated, although a portion of the lower part of that eyewall was evident on satellite images.  A large circular eye was present at the center of Typhoon Jebi.  The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Multiple bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Typhoon Jebi.  Storms around the core were generating strong upper level divergence.  Winds to typhoon force extended out about 45 miles (75 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 175 miles (280 km) from the center.

Typhoon Jebi will move through an environment capable of supporting a typhoon during the next 48 hours.  Jebi will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  Typhoon Jebi will move through an area where the upper level winds are relatively weak on Sunday. Jebi will move closer to an upper level trough northwest of Japan on Monday.  Stronger southwesterly winds will cause more vertical wind shear and Typhoon Jebi will start to weaken at that time.

Typhoon Jebi will move around the western end of a subtropical ridge over the Western North Pacific Ocean.  Jebi will turn more toward the north on Sunday.  The upper level trough northwest of Japan will steer Typhoon Jebi more toward the northeast on Monday.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Jebi could approach Shikoku and Honshu in about two days.  Jebi is forecast to be a typhoon when it approaches Japan.

Typhoon Soulik Strikes Cheju Island

Typhoon Soulik struck Cheju Island on Wednesday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Typhoon Soulik was located at latitude 33.0°N and longitude 125.7°E which put it about 50 miles (80 km) west of Cheju Island.  Soulik was moving toward the north-northwest at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 115 m.p.h. (185 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 969 mb.

Typhoon Soulik had a large eye and the eastern eyewall, which was the strongest part of the circulation, moved directly over Cheju Island on Wednesday.  The island would have experienced winds to typhoon force and heavy rain.  The heavy rain could produce flash floods.  Typhoon Soulik weakened as it approached Cheju.  The circulation appeared to draw some drier air around the western and southern side of the circulation.  The heaviest rain was falling in the northern and eastern quadrants of the typhoon.  Soulik was moving over cooler water and an upper level trough over eastern Asia was causing vertical wind shear.

The upper level trough will turn Typhoon Soulik toward the northeast during the next 24 hours.  On its anticipated track the center of Typhoon Soulik could pass near the southwestern tip of South Korea in about 12 hours.  Soulik could make landfall near Kunsan in about 24 hours.  The eastern side of Typhoon Soulik, which is the stronger side, will pass over much of South Korea during the next 24 hours.  Soulik will produce gusty winds and it will drop locally heavy rain.  The rain could produce flash floods on the Korean peninsula.

Elsewhere over the tropical Western North Pacific Ocean, Typhoon Cimaron moved closer to Japan.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Typhoon Cimaron was located at latitude 29.4°N and longitude 135.6°E which put it about 335 miles (540 km) south of Osaka, Japan.  Cimaron was moving toward the northwest at 23 m.p.h. (37 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 105 m.p.h. (170 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 125 m.p.h. (200 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 956 mb.

Typhoon Cimaron is forecast to move quickly toward Japan during the next 24 hours.  On its anticipated track Cimaron will approach the coasts of Shikoku and Honshu between Tokushima and Tanabe in about 12 hours.  Cimaron is forecast to be a typhoon when it makes landfall in Japan.  It will bring strong winds and Cimaron will drop locally heavy rain.  Flash floods could occur, especially in regions of steeper terrain.

Typhoon Jongdari Makes Landfall on Honshu

Typhoon Jongdari made landfall on Honshu near Ise in the Mie Prefecture on Saturday.  The maximum sustained wind speed was 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h) at the time of landfall.  Jongdari weakened to a tropical storm after the center moved over Honshu.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Jongdari was located at latitude 34.7°N and longitude 135.0°E which put it about 20 miles (30 km) southwest of Kobe, Japan.  Jongdari was moving toward the west-northwest at 25 m.p.h. (40 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 70 m.p.h. (110 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 980 mb.

The center of Typhoon Jongdari made landfall in the Mie Prefecture on Honshu near Ise and Toba.  Jongdari then moved west-northwest near Matsusaka and Tsu.  It passed near Nara and Osaka before moving to its current position southwest of Kobe.  Typhoon Jongdari brought gusty winds and it dropped locally heavy rain over parts of the Mie, Nara, Shiga, Kyoto, Osaka and Hyogo Prefectures.  The ground in some of those places is very moist from recent rains and flash flooding could occur if more heavy rain falls.  The relatively rapid movement of Tropical Storm Jongdari will help to reduce the amount of rain that falls over specific locations.

Tropical Storm Jongdari will continue to weaken as it moves over western Honshu and northern Kyushu.  Jongdari is moving around the northern side of an upper level low south of Japan.  The upper level low will steer Tropical Storm Jongdari quickly to the west during the next 12 hours.  Jongdari will move southwest on Sunday when it moves around the northwestern part of the upper low.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Jongdari will move near Okayama, Hiroshima, Yamaguchi, Kitakyushu and Fukuoka.  The tropical storm will continue to drop locally heavy rain while it weakens over western Japan.

Typhoon Jongdari Turns Toward Honshu

Typhoon Jongdari turned toward Honshu on Friday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Typhoon Jongdari was located at latitude 31.0°N and longitude 143.7°E which put it about 415 miles (665 km) southeast of Tokyo, Japan.  Jongdari was moving toward the north at 24 m.p.h. (39 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 105 m.p.h. (170 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 125 m.p.h. (205 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 957 mb.

An upper level low west of Typhoon Jongdari was affecting the circulation.  Winds blowing around the eastern side of the upper low were cutting under the upper level divergence at the top of the circulation of Jongdari.  In addition, drier flowing around the southern half of the upper low was being pulled into the western side of the circulation of Typhoon Jongdari.  The effects of the upper low were causing the circulation of Typhoon Jongdari to become asymmetrical.  Many of the stronger thunderstorms and stronger winds were occurring in bands in the eastern half of the circulation.  Bands in the western half of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.  With fewer strong thunderstorms in the western part of the typhoon with downdrafts to bring stronger winds to the surface the wind field was also becoming asymmetrical.  Winds to typhoon force extended out about 100 miles (160 km) from the center of circulation on the eastern side of Jongdari, but they only extended out about 50 miles (80 km) on the western side.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 230 miles (370 km) to the east of the center, but only extended out about 170 miles (280 km) to the west of the center of circulation.

The upper level low will continue to affect Typhoon Jongdari.  Jongdari will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  So, there will be sufficient energy in the upper ocean to support a strong typhoon.  However, the upper low will inhibit upper level divergence to the west of the circulation.  Upper level divergence will be strong to the southeast of Typhoon Jongdari.  Drier air flowing around the upper low will inhibit the formation of thunderstorms in bands in the southwestern part of the circulation.  Typhoon Jongdari is likely to weaken slowly, although it could maintain its intensity at times as it moves around the northern side of the upper low.

The upper low will also steer Typhoon Jongdari during the weekend.  Jongdari will turn more toward the west-northwest when it moves around the northern part of the upper low.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Jongdari could pass south of Tokyo in about 18 hours.  The center of Jongdari could be very close to Hamamatsu in about 24 hours.  It could make landfall near Matsuzaka in a little over a day.  Typhoon Jongdari could pass very close to Osaka and Kobe and it could pass just south of Kyoto.  Heavy rain fell on parts of Japan earlier this month and Typhoon Jongdari could cause serious flooding in some locations.

Typhoon Noru Skirts Coast of Shikoku on Way to Honshu

The eye of Typhoon Noru skirted the coast of Shikoku on Sunday as it moved closer to a landfall on Honshu.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Typhoon Noru was located at latitude 33.6°N and longitude 134.5°W which put it about 85 miles (135 km) southwest of Osaka, Japan.  Noru was moving toward the northeast at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 970 mb.

The structure of Typhoon Noru improved on Sunday.  The circulation contracted around an eye with a diameter of approximately 20 miles (32 km).  They eye was surrounded by a ring of thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in the ring of storms.  Additional spiral bands were revolving around the core of Typhoon Noru.

An upper level trough northwest of Japan steered Typhoon Noru toward the northeast on Sunday.  The eye of Noru moved near the south coast of Shikoku.  The eye passed south of Kochi and very near Muroto, Toyo and Kainan.  Typhoon Noru brought gusty winds and heavy rain to the southern parts of Shikoku.

Typhoon Noru is expected to continue to move toward the northeast on Monday.  On its anticipated track the center of Typhoon Noru is expected to skirt the east coast of Shikoku and make landfall on Honshu near Wakayama.   After it makes landfall, Typhoon Noru is forecast to pass near Osaka and Kyoto.  Typhoon Noru will weaken as it moves across Honshu, but it will produce gusty winds and locally heavy rain.  The rain could cause floods in some locations.