Tag Archives: Leeward Islands

Tropical Storms Paulette and Rene Spin over the Atlantic

Tropical Storms Paulette and Rene continued to spin over the Atlantic Ocean on Wednesday afternoon.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Paulette was located at latitude 20.5°N and longitude 47.4°W which put it about 1035 miles (1665 km) east of the Northern Leeward Islands.  Paulette was moving toward the west-northwest at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 996 mb.

The distribution of thunderstorms around Tropical Storm Paulette was asymmetrical due to wind shear being cause by an upper level ridge over the eastern Atlantic Ocean.  Paulette was under the western end of the ridge where there were strong winds blowing from the south.  Those winds were blowing toward the top of Tropical Storm Paulette and they were causing strong vertical wind shear.  As a result of the shear, the strongest thunderstorms were occurring in bands northeast of the center of Paulette.  Bands in other parts of the tropical storm consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 90 miles to the north of the center of circulation.  Winds in the southern half of Paulette were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Paulette will move through an environment that is mostly unfavorable for intensification during the next day or two.  Paulette will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 27.5°C.  However, the upper level ridge will continue to cause strong vertical wind shear.  Tropical Storm Paulette is likely to weaken during the next 24 hours.  Paulette could move into an area where the upper level winds are not as strong during the weekend.  It could start to strengthen at that time.

Tropical Storm Paulette will move south of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer Paulette toward the west-northwest during the next 36 hours.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Paulette could be northeast of the Leeward Islands on Saturday.

At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Rene was located at latitude 18.0°N and longitude 32.7°W which put it about 590 miles (950 km) west-northwest of the Cabo Verde Islands.  Rene was moving toward the west-northwest at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1003 mb.

Tropical Storm Rene was moving under the southern part of the same upper level ridge that was affecting Tropical Storm Paulette.  Easterly winds were blowing toward the top of Rene’s circulation.  Those winds were causing moderate vertical wind shear.  As a result of the shear, the strongest thunderstorms were occurring in bands in the western half of Tropical Storm Rene.  Bands in the eastern half of Rene consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 45 miles (75 km) on the northwestern side of Tropical Storm Rene.  The winds in the other parts of Rene were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Rene will move through an environment marginally favorable for intensification during the next day or two.  Rene will move over water where Sea Surface Temperature is near 26°C.  The upper level ridge will continue to cause vertical wind shear, but the shear could decrease enough at times to allow Tropical Storm Rene to strengthen.

Tropical Storm Rene will also move south of the subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic.  The high will steer Rene toward the west-northwest during the next 36 hours.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Rene will move farther away from the Cabo Verde Islands.

Tropical Storms Paulette and Rene Form over the Atlantic

Tropical Storms Paulette and Rene formed over the Atlantic Ocean on Monday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Storm Paulette was located at latitude 17.5°N and longitude 42.4°W which put it about 1360 miles (2190 km) east of the Northern Leeward Islands.  Paulette was moving toward the northwest at 3 m.p.h. (5 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1005 mb.

At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Storm Rene was located at latitude 16.1°N and longitude 22.3°W which put it about 115 miles (185 km) east of the Cabo Verde Islands.  Rene was moving toward the west-northwest at 12 m.p.h (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1001 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the Cabo Verde Islands.

Tropical Storm Paulette formed first when former Tropical Depression Seventeen strengthened on Sunday morning.  The circulation around Paulette exhibited more organization on Sunday afternoon.  More thunderstorms developed in bands in the northern half of the circulation and the strongest winds were occurring in those bands,  Bands in the southern half of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.  Storms on the northern side of the center began to generate upper level divergence which pumped mass away from the tropical storm.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 70 miles (110 km) to the northeast of the center of Paulette.  Winds in the other parts of the circulation were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Paulette will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next several days.  Paulette will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 27.5°C.  It will move under the western part of an upper level ridge over the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean.  The ridge will produce southerly winds which will blow toward the top of Tropical Storm Paulette.  Those winds will cause vertical wind shear.  They are probably the cause of the asymmetric distribution of thunderstorms and they will slow the rate of intensification.  Tropical Storm Paulette will get stronger during the next day or two.

Tropical Storm Paulette will move south of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer Paulette toward the west-northwest.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Paulette could be northeast of the Leeward Islands in a few days.

The circulation within a tropical wave over the eastern Atlantic Ocean strengthened on Sunday afternoon and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Storm Rene.  A distinct center of circulation formed in Rene.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the center of Rene.  The strongest thunderstorms were in bands in the western half of the circulation, but more thunderstorms were starting to develop in bands east of the center.  Storms near the center began to generate upper level divergence which pumped mass away to the north of the tropical storm.  Winds to tropical storms force extended out 45 miles to the north of the center of Tropical Storm Rene.  The wind in the southern half of the circulation was blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Rene will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next several days.  Rene will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 27°C.  It will move under the axis of the upper level ridge over the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean.  The upper level winds are weaker near the axis of the ridge and there will be less vertical wind shear.  Tropical Storm Rene is likely to intensify and it could strengthen into a hurricane later this week.

Tropical Storm Rene will also move south of the subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer Rene toward the west-northwest during the next two to three days.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Rene will move across the Cabo Verde Islands during the next 24 ours.  Rene will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain.

Tropical Depression Seventeen Forms East of Leeward Islands

Tropical Depression Seventeen formed well east of the Leeward Islands on Sunday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Tropical Depression Seventeen was located at latitude 17.0°N and longitude 41.5°W which put it about 1475 miles (2290 km) east of the Northern Leeward Islands.  The depression was moving toward the west at 5 m.p.h. (8 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1006 mb.

The circulation around a large low pressure system over the tropical Atlantic Ocean east of the Leeward Islands exhibited more organization on Sunday night and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Depression Seventeen.  The circulation around the depression was still organizing.  There was a broad center of rotation in the middle of the circulation.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving the broad center.  The strongest thunderstorms were in bands on the eastern side of the depression.  Storms in bands around the broad center began to generate upper level divergence which pumped mass away from the depression.

Tropical Depression Seventeen will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next day or two.  The depression will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 27°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  The large size of the tropical depression and the broad center of circulation will limit the rate at which the depression intensifies.  Tropical Depression Seventeen is likely to strengthen into a tropical storm on Monday.

Tropical Depression Seventeen will move south of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer the depression slowly toward the west during the next day or two.  There is a large circulation around a strong tropical wave to the east of Tropical Depression Seventeen.  It is possible that the tropical wave strengthens into a tropical cyclone.  If that happens, then the large circulation could pull the depression back to the east or at least retard its movement toward the west.  On its anticipated track the tropical depression could be northeast of the Leeward islands in a few days.

Tropical Storm Laura Develops, Warnings for Puerto Rico and Leeward Islands

Tropical Storm Laura developed east of the northern Leeward Islands on Friday morning.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Laura was located at latitude 17.0°N and longitude 60.2°W which put it about 210 miles (335 km) east-southeast of the northern Leeward Islands.  Laura was moving toward the west at 18 m.p.h. (30 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1007 mb.

Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for Saba, St. Eustatius, St. Maarten, Antigua, Barbuda, St. Kitts, Nevis, Anguilla, St. Martin, St. Barthelemy, the British Virgin Islands, the U. S, Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, Vieques, and Culebra.

Tropical Storm Watches were in effect for the portion of the north coast of Hispaniola from Le Mole St. Nicholas, Haiti to Cabron, Dominican Republic and for the Turks and Caicos, the Acklins, Crooked Island, Long Cay, the Inaguas, and the Ragged Islands.

A NOAA plane found winds to tropical storm force in former Tropical Depression Thirteen on Friday morning and the National Hurricane Center upgraded the system to Tropical Storm Laura.  Even though the plane found winds to tropical storm force, the circulation around Tropical Storm Laura was not well organized. There were several clusters of thunderstorms in the northern half of the circulation, but there were fewer thunderstorms in the southern half of Laura.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 150 miles (240 km) on the northern side of the tropical storm.  The winds in the southern half of the circulation were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Laura will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours.  Laura will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  The lack of organization of the circulation around Laura will limit how quickly the tropical storm can intensify.  Tropical Storm Laura is likely to get stronger during the next 24 hours.

Tropical Storm Laura will move south of a subtropical high pressure system over the North Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer Laura toward the west-northwest during the next several days.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Laura will move across the northern Leeward Islands later today.  Laura could reach Puerto Rico by Saturday.  Tropical Storm Laura will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to the islands when it passes over them.

Elsewhere, Tropical Depression Fourteen was getting more organized over the northwestern Caribbean Sea.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Depression Fourteen was located at latitude 16.6°N and longitude 84.1°W which put it about 325 miles (525 km) southeast of Cozumel, Mexico.  The depression was moving toward the northwest at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1008 mb.

A Hurricane Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Punta Herrero to Cancun, Mexico.  A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the Bay Islands, Honduras and from Punta Herrero to Cancun, Mexico.  A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Cancun to Dzilam, Mexico.

Tropical Depression Fourteen Forms Over Western Caribbean

Tropical Depression Fourteen formed over the western Caribbean Sea on Thursday morning.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Depression Fourteen was located at latitude 15.1°N and longitude 79.7°W which put it about 235 miles (375 km) east of Cabo Gracias a Dios.  The depression was moving toward the west at 21 m.p.h. (33 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1007 mb.

A Tropical Storm Watch was issued for the portion of the coast of Honduras from the border with Nicaragua to Punta Castilla including the Bay Islands.

Satellite images on Thursday morning indicated that a center of circulation had developed within a tropical wave over the western Caribbean Sea and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Depression Fourteen.  The circulation around Tropical Depression Fourteen was still organizing.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were developing and they were beginning to revolve around the center of circulation.  Storms near the center started to generate upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the depression.

Tropical Depression Fourteen will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 36 to 48 hours.  The depression will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and the will be little vertical wind shear.  Tropical Depression Fourteen will strengthen during the next day or two.

Tropical Depression Fourteen will move around the southwester part of a subtropical high pressure system over the North Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer the depression toward the west-northwest during the next 24 hours.  The depression will turn toward the northwest on Friday when it gets closer to the western end of the high.  On its anticipated track Tropical Depression Fourteen will pass near the coast of Honduras on Friday.  It will approach the Yucatan Peninsula on Saturday.  The depression could drop heavy rain over eastern Honduras and flash floods will be possible.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean,, Tropical Depression Thirteen was speeding toward the northern Leeward Islands.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Depression Thirteen was located at latitude 16.0°N and longitude 52.0°W which put it about 750 miles (1205 km) east-southeast of the northern Leeward Islands.  The depression was moving toward the west-northwest at 21 m.p.h. (33km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1008 mb.

Tropical Storm Watches were in effect for Saba and St. Eustatius, St. Maarten, St. Kitts, Nevis, Antigua, Barbuda and Anguilla.

Tropical Depression 13 Forms, Watch Issued for Saba and St. Eustatius

Tropical Depression Thirteen formed about 1000 miles (1600 km) east of the Lesser Antilles on Wednesday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Depression Thirteen was located at latitude 14.6°N and longitude 47.9°W which put it about 1035 miles (1670 km) east-southeast of the northern Leeward Islands.  The depression was moving toward the west-northwest at 20 m.p.h. (32 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1008 mb.

A Tropical Storm Watch was issued for Saba and St. Eustatius.

A distinct center of circulation developed within a tropical wave east of the Lesser Antilles on Wednesday night and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Depression Thirteen.  The circulation around the depression was still organizing.  Thunderstorms were building near the newly formed center of circulation.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were developing.  The stronger thunderstorms were in bands in the northern half of the circulation.  Storms near the center began to generate upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the depression.

Tropical Depression Thirteen will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next few days.  The depression will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  It will move a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Tropical Depression Thirteen will likely strengthen gradually at first while the circulation is organizing.  If an inner core develops, then the rate of intensification could increase.

Tropical Depression Thirteen will move south of the subtropical high pressure system over the North Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer the depression toward the west-northwest during the next few days.  On its anticipated track Tropical Depression Thirteen could approach the northern Leeward Islands on Friday.

Tropical Storm Kyle Forms East of U.S.

Tropical Storm Kyle formed off the East Coast of the U.S. on Friday afternoon.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Kyle was located at latitude 37.7°N and longitude 71.7°W which put it about 185 miles (300 km) southeast of Atlantic City, New Jersey.  Kyle was moving toward the east-northeast at 17 m.p.h. (28 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1008 mb.

Based on data from satellites and surface observations the National Hurricane Center (NHC) determined that a low pressure system off the East Coast of the U.S. possessed characteristics of a tropical cyclone and winds to tropical storm force.  NHC designated the system as Tropical Storm Kyle on Friday afternoon.  Kyle had a well defined low level center of circulation.  Many of the stronger thunderstorms were occurring in bands in the eastern half of Tropical Storm Kyle.  Bands in the western half of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 80 miles to the southeast of the center of circulation.  Winds in the other parts of Kyle were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Kyle will move through an environment marginally favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours.  Kyle will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 27°C.  An upper level trough over eastern Canada and the Great Lakes will produces southwesterly winds which will blow toward the top of tropical storm Kyle.  Those winds will cause moderate vertical wind shear and they will inhibit intensification.  Tropical Storm Kyle could strengthen a little more during the next day or so.

The southwesterly winds will steer Tropical Storm Kyle toward the east-northeast during the next several days.  On its anticipated track Kyle is forecast to pass south of Nova Scotia and Labrador.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, Tropical Storm Josephine was spinning east of the northern Leeward Islands.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Josephine was located at latitude 17.8°N and longitude 56.1°E which put it about 460 miles (740 km) east of the northern Leeward Islands.  Josephine was moving toward the west-northwest at 16 m.p.h. (26 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1004 mb.

TD 11 Strengthens to Tropical Storm Josephine

Former Tropical Depression Eleven strengthened to Tropical Storm Josephine on Thursday morning.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Josephine was located at latitude 13.7°N and longitude 49.2°W which put it about 975 miles (1565 km) east-southeast of the northern Leeward Islands.  Josephine was moving toward the west-northwest at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1005 mb.

Satellite imagery indicated that the circulation around former Tropical Depression Eleven exhibited better organization on Thursday morning and the National Hurricane Center upgraded the system to Tropical Storm Josephine.  Although the circulation around Tropical Storm Josephine was more organized, the distribution of thunderstorms and wind speeds was still asymmetrical.  Many of the stronger thunderstorms were occurring in bands in the northwestern part of Josephine.  Bands in other parts of the tropical storm consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 80 miles (130 km) on the northern side of Tropical Storm Josephine.  The winds in the southern half of the circulation were mostly weaker than tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Josephine will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next day or so.  Josephine will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Tropical Storm Josephine is forecast to strengthen during the next 24 to 36 hours.

Tropical Storm Josephine will move south of a subtropical high pressure system over the North Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer Josephine toward the west-northwest during he next several days.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Josephine could be near the northern Leeward Islands on Saturday.

Tropical Depression Eleven Forms over the Atlantic

Tropical Depression Eleven formed over the Atlantic Ocean on Tuesday afternoon.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Depression Eleven was located at latitude 11.7°N and longitude 40.0°W which put it about 1450 miles (2335 km) east of the Lesser Antilles.  The depression was moving toward the west at 16 m.p.h. (26 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1007 mb.

More thunderstorms developed closer to the center of a low pressure system over the tropical Atlantic Ocean on Tuesday afternoon and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Depression Eleven.  The strongest thunderstorms were developing in bands in the western half of the depression.  Bands in the eastern half of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.  Storms near the center of circulation began to generate upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the depression.

Tropical Depression Eleven will move through an environment which will be favorable for intensification.  The depression will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  Tropical Depression Eleven is currently moving the a region where the easterly winds are stronger in the lower atmosphere than they are at higher elevations.  The difference in wind speed is creating moderate vertical wind shear, which is contributing to the asymmetrical distribution of thunderstorms.  The winds in the lower atmosphere are forecast to weaken, which will reduce the vertical wind shear.  When the shear is reduced Tropical Depression Eleven is likely to strengthen into a tropical storm.

Tropical Depression Eleven will move south of a subtropical high pressure system over the North Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer Tropical Depression Eleven toward the west-northwest during the next few days.  On its anticipated track Tropical Depression Eleven could approach the northern Leeward Islands on Saturday.  It will likely be a tropical storm by that time.

Potential Tropical Storm Prompts Warnings for Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, Leeward Islands

A low pressure system that has the potential to organize into a tropical storm prompted the issuance of Tropical Storm Warnings for Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and many of the Leeward Islands on Tuesday morning.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Potential Tropical Cyclone Nine was located at latitude 13.8°N and longitude 53.7°W which put it about 585 miles (940 km) east-southeast of the Leeward Islands.  It was moving toward the west at 23 m.p.h. (37 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1007 mb.

Tropical Storm Warnings were issued for Puerto Rico, Culebra, Vieques, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Antigua, Barbuda, the British Virgin Islands, Montserrat, St. Kitts, Nevis, Guadeloupe, Martinique, St. Martin, Saba, St. Eustatius, and St. Maarten.

The circulation around Potential Tropical Cyclone Nine was very broad and it stretched from the southwest toward the northeast.  The stronger thunderstorms were occurring in the southwestern and northeastern ends of the circulation.  There were few thunderstorms or bands in the broad middle of the low pressure system.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 200 miles (320 km) on the northern side of the circulation.  The winds in the southern half of the low pressure system were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Potential Tropical Cyclone Nine will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next two days.  It will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  It will move through an area where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  The large broad circulation will contribute to a slow, gradual intensification.  If thunderstorms consolidate around a center of circulation and an inner core begins to form, then the system may be designated as a tropical storm.

Potential Tropical Cyclone Nine will move south of a subtropical high pressure system over the North Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer the potential tropical storm toward the west-northwest during the next several days.  On its anticipated track Potential Tropical Cyclone Nine could approach the Leeward Islands on Wednesday morning.  It could approach the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico by Wednesday night.  The large circulation means that Potential Tropical Nine will bring a prolonged period of gusty winds.  It could also drop heavy rain and cause flash floods on some islands.