Tag Archives: Lesser Antilles

Tropical Storm Karen Develops Near Windward Islands

Tropical Storm Karen developed near the Windward Islands on Sunday morning.  At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Tropical Storm Karen was located at latitude 11.9°N and longitude 60.9°W which put it about 55 miles (90 km) east-southeast of Grenada.  Karen was moving toward the west-northwest at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1005 mb.

Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for Trinidad and Tobago, Grenada, and for St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

A center of circulation developed in an area of thunderstorms east of the axis of a strong tropical wave near the Windward Islands on Sunday morning and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Storm Karen.  The strongest thunderstorms were forming in bands south and west of the center of circulation.  Bands north and west of the center consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.   Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 125 miles (200 km) on the eastern side of the tropical storm.

An upper level trough northeast of the Lesser Antilles was producing strong westerly winds which were blowing across the northern side of Tropical Storm Karen.  An upper level ridge over the Caribbean Sea was producing strong northeasterly winds which were blowing across the western part of Karen.  The upper level winds were causing moderate vertical wind shear which was inhibiting the development of thunderstorms in those parts of Tropical Storm Karen.  The center of circulation developed in a region between the stronger upper level westerly and northeasterly winds.  Most of the thunderstorms were forming in that area where the upper level winds were not as strong.

Tropical Storm Karen will move through an environment that will be only marginally favorable for intensification during the next day or two.  Karen will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature  is near 29°C.  However, the upper level trough and upper level ridge will continue to cause moderate vertical wind shear.  If Tropical Storm Karen remains in the zone where the upper level winds are not as strong, it could strengthen.  However, if Karen moves under stronger upper level winds, it could weaken to a depression.  Tropical Storm Karen is forecast to move closer to the center of the upper level ridge in two or three days.  If that happens, then the upper level winds will be weaker and Karen could intensify.

Tropical Storm Karen will move around the western end of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer Karen toward the west-northwest during the next 12 hours.  Karen will move more toward the north when reaches the end of the ridge.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Karen will move across the Windward Islands on Sunday.  Karen will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain.  Flash floods are likely.  Tropical Storm Karen could approach Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands on Tuesday.  Tropical Storm Watches are likely to be issued for those islands.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean Tropical Storm Jerry was spinning south of Bermuda.  At 5:00 a.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Tropical Storm Jerry was located at latitude 25.0°N and longitude 66.9°W which put it about 520 miles (835 km) south-southwest of Bermuda.  Jerry was moving toward the north-northwest at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb.

Tropical Storm Imelda Forms Along Upper Texas Coast

Tropical Storm Imelda formed along the Upper Texas coast on Tuesday.  At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Storm Imelda was located at latitude 29.0°N and longitude 95.3°W which put it near Freeport, Texas.  Imelda was moving toward the north at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1005 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Sargent to Port Bolivar, Texas.

A small low pressure system over the northwestern Gulf of Mexico exhibited greater organization on satellite and radar images on Tuesday.  When a surface weather station reported a sustained wind speed of 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h), the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Storm Imelda.  The winds to tropical storm force were occurring southeast of the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 45 miles (75 km) in the southeastern quadrant of Tropical Storm Imelda.

Tropical Storm Imelda will move around the western end of a warm high pressure system over the southeastern U.S.  The high will steer Imelda slowly toward the north during the next several days.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Imelda will move slowly inland over east Texas.  Although Imelda will cause a small storm surge along the coast around the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, locally heavy rain will pose a much greater risk.  Southeasterly winds blowing around the eastern side of Tropical Storm Imelda will transport very moist air over parts of eastern Texas.  Over a foot of rain (0.33 meters) could fall in some locations where rain bands linger.  Flash Flood Watches have been issued for a number of counties around Houston and Galveston.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, Hurricane Humberto moved closer to Bermuda and Tropical Depression Ten formed east of the Lesser Antilles.  At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Hurricane Humberto was located at latitude 30.8°N and longitude 72.9°W which put it about 490 miles (785 km) west-southwest of Bermuda.  Humberto was moving toward the east-northeast at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 120 m.p.h. (195 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 961 mb.

A Hurricane Watch and a Tropical Storm Warning were in effect for Bermuda.

At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Depression Ten was located at latitude 12.9°N and longitude 44.9°W which put it about 1165 miles (1870 km) east-southeast of the Leeward Islands.  It was moving toward the west-northwest at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1007 mb.  The depression is forecast to strengthen into a hurricane while it moves toward the northern Leeward Islands.

Stronger Tropical Storm Dorian Causes Warnings for Lesser Antilles

Tropical Storm Dorian strengthened on Sunday and the threat it posed caused warnings and watches to be issued for some of the Lesser Antilles.  Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for Barbados, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines.  Tropical Storm Watches were issued for Grenada and Martinique.

At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Tropical Storm Dorian was located at latitude 11.5°N and longitude 54.2°W which put it about 375 miles (605 km) east-southeast of Barbados.  Dorian was moving a little to the north of due west at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1003 mb.

The circulation around Tropical Storm Dorian exhibited greater organization on Sunday afternoon.  The inner end of a band of showers and thunderstorms wrapped tightly around the northern and western sides of the center of circulation.  The strongest winds were occurring in that band.  Several other bands of showers and storms were revolving around the small core of Dorian.  Storms near the center of circulation were generating upper level divergence which was pumping mass away to the north of the tropical storm.  The circulation around Tropical Storm Dorian was small.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 35 miles (55 km) from the center of circulation.

Tropical Storm Dorian will move through an environment mostly favorable for intensification.  Dorian will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28.5°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are relatively weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  A large area of drier air is north of Tropical Storm Dorian.  If the circulation draws drier air into the tropical storm, it would interrupt intensification.  Tropical Storm Dorian is likely to strengthen during the next 24 to 48 hours.  Since Dorian has a small circulation, it could intensify or weaken quickly if the environmental conditions change.

Tropical Storm Dorian will move south of the subtropical high pressure system over the North Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer Dorian toward the west-northwest during the next few days.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Dorian could approach Barbados late on Monday.  It could be a hurricane by that time.  Dorian could reach the southern and central Lesser Antilles on Tuesday.  Tropical Storm Dorian could bring strong winds and heavy rain to those islands.

Tropical Depression Five Strengthens Into Tropical Storm Dorian

Former Tropical Depression Five strengthened into Tropical Storm Dorian east of the Lesser Antilles on Saturday afternoon.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Dorian was located at latitude 10.7°N and longitude 49.1°W which put it about 725 miles (1165 km) east southeast of Barbados.  Dorian was moving toward the west at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1008 mb.

The circulation around former Tropical Depression Five exhibited greater organization on Saturday afternoon and the National Hurricane Center determined that the system had strengthened to Tropical Storm Dorian.  A band of thunderstorms close to the center of circulation wrapped around the western and southern sides of the center.  The strongest winds were occurring in that band of storms.  Other bands in the western half of the circulation started to revolve around the center of circulation.  Storms near the center began to generate upper level divergence which was pumping mass away to the west of the tropical storm.  The circulation around Tropical Storm Dorian was small.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 25 miles (40 km) from the center of circulation.

Tropical Storm Dorian will move through an environment that will be favorable for intensification during the next several days.  Dorian will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  It will move south of an upper level ridge.  The ridge will produce easterly winds which will blow toward the top of the circulation.  Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear.  The shear will slow the rate of intensification.  Tropical Storm Dorian will move south of a region of drier air.  If drier air is pulled into the circulation, it will interrupt intensification.  Since Tropical Storm Dorian is so small, it could strengthen or weaken very quickly if the environment changes.  Dorian could strengthen into a hurricane in two or three days.

Tropical Storm Dorian will move south of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer Dorian toward the west-northwest during the next few days.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Dorian could approach the Lesser Antilles on Tuesday.  Dorian could strengthen into a hurricane by that time.  Watches and/or warnings could be issued for parts of the Lesser Antilles on Sunday.

Tropical Depression Five Forms East of Lesser Antilles

Tropical Depression Five formed east of the Lesser Antilles on Saturday morning.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Depression Five was located at latitude 10.4°N and longitude 47.9°W which put it about 805 miles (1300 km) east-southeast of Barbados.  It was moving toward the west at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1010 mb.

Data from satellites indicated that there was a closed circulation around an area of low pressure east of the Lesser Antilles on Saturday morning and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Depression Five.  The circulation around Tropical Depression Five was still organizing.  Many of the stronger thunderstorms were occurring in bands west of the center of circulation.  Bands in the eastern half of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.  The circulation around Tropical Depression Five was relatively small.

Tropical Depression Five will move through an environment favorable for slow intensification.  It will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  The depression will move south of an upper level ridge over the western north Atlantic Ocean.  The ridge will produce easterly winds which will cause some vertical wind shear.  There will be some drier air just to the north of the depression.  If the depression pulls some of the drier air into the circulation, that could also interrupt intensification.  The combination of some wind shear and intrusions of drier air will limit the rate at which Tropical Depression Five strengthens.  The depression is forecast to strengthen into a tropical storm.

Tropical Depression Five will move south of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer the depression toward the west-northwest during the next few days.  On its anticipated track Tropical Depression Five could approach the Lesser Antilles on Monday night or Tuesday.  The depression could be a tropical storm by that time.

Tropical Storm Kirk Brings Rain to Lesser Antilles

Tropical Storm Kirk brought rain to some of the Lesser Antilles on Friday.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Kirk was located at latitude 13.8°N and longitude 63.6°W which put it about 360 miles (575 km) south-southeast of San Juan, Puerto Rico.  Kirk was moving toward the west-northwest at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1007 mb.  All Tropical Storm Warnings and Watches have been discontinued.

An upper level trough over the Caribbean Sea is producing strong westerly winds which is blowing over the top of Tropical Storm Kirk.  Those winds are causing strong vertical wind shear, which is causing the strongest thunderstorms to occur on the far eastern side of the circulation.  Bands west of the center of circulation and near the center consist primarily of showers and lower clouds.  The center of circulation is over the eastern Caribbean Sea and the heavy rain is falling hours after the center passed the Lesser Antilles.  Locally heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations.

Tropical Storm Kirk will move through an environment that will be unfavorable for intensification during the weekend.  Kirk will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  However, the upper level trough will continue cause strong vertical wind shear for the next several days.  Tropical Storm Kirk will likely weaken to a tropical depression or a tropical wave during the next 24 to 48 hours.

Tropical Storm Kirk will move south of a subtropical high pressure system that is over the Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer Kirk in a general west-northwesterly direction during the weekend.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Kirk should stay south of Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.  Kirk or its remnants could be near Jamaica in a few days.

Tropical Storm Kirk Redevelops East of Lesser Antilles, Warnings Issued

Tropical Storm Kirk redeveloped east of the Lesser Antilles on Wednesday morning and Tropical Storm Warnings and Watches were issued for some of those islands.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Kirk was located at latitude 12.1°N and longitude 54.3°W which put it about 360 miles (575 km) east-southeast of Barbados.  Kirk was moving toward the west at 18 m.p.h. (30 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb.

Tropical Storm Warnings have been issued for Barbados, St. Lucia, Dominica, Martinique and Guadeloupe.  A Tropical Storm Watch has been issued for St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) indicated that former Tropical Storm Kirk had weakened to a tropical wave on Monday and NHC ceased issuing advisories on the system.  The remnants of former Tropical Storm Kirk moved quickly westward across the tropical Atlantic Ocean.  More thunderstorms began developing in the system on Tuesday.  NHC determined that sufficient thunderstorms had formed near the center of circulation by Wednesday morning to reclassify the system as a tropical cyclone and it started issuing advisories on Tropical Storm Kirk again.

A cluster of strong thunderstorms developed near the center of Tropical Storm Kirk.  Thunderstorms were also forming in several bands which were revolving around the center of circulation.  Thunderstorms near the core of Kirk were generating upper level divergence which was pumping mass away to the east of the tropical storm.

Tropical Storm Kirk will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours.  Kirk will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  It will move through an area where the upper level winds are not too strong.  There will be some vertical wind shear, but the wind shear will not be strong enough to prevent intensification in the short term.  When Tropical Storm Kirk moves over the eastern Caribbean Sea, it will encounter stronger westerly winds and the vertical wind shear will increase.

Tropical Storm Kirk will move south of the subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean.  The subtropical high will steer Kirk on a path a little north of due west.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Kirk could be near Barbados on Thursday morning.  Kirk could reach the Lesser Antilles later on Thursday.  Tropical Storm Kirk will bring gusty winds and it could drop locally heavy rain.

Tropical Storm Kirk Forms South of the Cabo Verde Islands

Tropical Storm Kirk formed south of the Cabo Verde Islands on Saturday.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Kirk was located at latitude 8.3°N and longitude 23.6°W which put it about 450 miles (730 km) south of the Cabo Verde Islands.  Kirk was moving toward the west at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1005 mb.

The circulation around Tropical Storm Kirk is large and not well organized.  There is a low level center of circulation, but there are not many thunderstorms near the center.  There were thunderstorms in a cluster west of the center and more thunderstorms were in another cluster east of the center.  Some of the thunderstorms appeared to be organizing into bands, but the bands were not well developed.

Tropical Storm Kirk will move through an environment during the next day or two that should be favorable for intensification.  Kirk will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 27°C.  It will move through an area where the upper level winds are weak and the wind shear will not be strong enough to prevent intensification.  Tropical Storm Kirk is likely to become more organized during the next 24 to 48 hours.  It will move into a region in a couple of days where the lower level easterly winds will be stronger vertical wind shear could increase.

Tropical Storm Kirk will move south of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer Kirk toward the west at a fairly quick pace.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Kirk could approach the Lesser Antilles by late next week.

Elsewhere over the tropical Atlantic, Tropical Depression Eleven moved slowly toward the Windward Islands.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Depression Eleven was located at latitude 13.2°N and longitude 53.8°W which put it about 485 miles (780 km) east of the Windward Islands.  It was moving toward the west at 3 m.p.h. (5 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 30 m.p.h. (50 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1008 mb.

Tropical Depression Eleven Forms East of the Windward Islands

Tropical Depression Eleven formed east of the Windward Islands on Friday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Depression Eleven was located at latitude 13.1°N and longitude 53.4°W which put it about 510 miles (825 km) east of the Windward Islands.  It was moving toward the west-northwest at 6 m.p.h. (10 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1007 mb.

A small circular low pressure system within a tropical wave has been moving westward toward the Windward Islands.  An upper level trough near the eastern Caribbean Sea has been producing southwesterly winds which blowing across the top of the low.  Those winds were producing significant vertical wind shear and they were preventing taller thunderstorms from persisting near the center of circulation.  The National Hurricane Center decided that the low pressure system possessed sufficient convection to be classified as a Tropical Depression at 11:00 p.m.. EDT on Friday night.

The distribution of thunderstorms around Tropical Depression Eleven was still asymmetrical because of the wind shear caused by the upper level trough.  There was a well defined, but small, low level circulation with a distinct center.  Most of the bands around the center of circulation consisted of showers and lower clouds.  There were stronger thunderstorms in some of the bands east of the center of circulation.

Tropical Depression Eleven will move through an environment somewhat favorable for intensification.  It will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  The upper level trough will continue to cause significant vertical wind shear.  The wind shear will limit the potential for intensification.  Tropical Depression Eleven could strengthen into a tropical storm, but rapid intensification is not likely.  However, small tropical cyclones can strengthen or weaken very rapidly if the environment around them changes.

Tropical Depression Eleven will move south of the subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer the depression in a west-northwesterly direction.  On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Depression Eleven could be east of the Lesser Antilles on Sunday night.

Hurricane Warnings Issued for Carolinas for Hurricane Florence

Hurricane Warnings were issued for the Carolinas on Tuesday for the potential impacts of Hurricane Florence.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Hurricane Florence was located at latitude 28.4°N and longitude 68.7°W which put it about 670 miles (1075 km) east-southeast of Cape Fear, North Carolina.  Florence was moving toward the west-northwest at 17 m.p.h. (28 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 140 m.p.h. (220 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 165 m.p.h. (270 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 946 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from South Santee River, South Carolina to Duck, North Carolina.  Hurricane Watches were in effect for the portions of the coast from Edisto Beach to South Santee River, South Carolina and from Duck, North Carolina to the North Carolina-Virginia border.  Tropical Storm Watches were in effect for the portions of the coast from Duck, North Carolina to Cape Charles Light, Virginia and for Chesapeake Bay south of New Point Comfort.

Hurricane Florence completed an eyewall replacement cycle and it continues to be a powerful hurricane.  There was a circular eye with a diameter of 30 miles (48 km) at the center of Florence.  The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  The eyewall replacement cycle resulted in a larger circulation.

Winds to hurricane force extended out about 60 miles (95 km) from the center of circulation of Hurricane Florence.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 175 miles (280 km) from the center.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Hurricane Florence was 28.2.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 18.9 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 47.1.  Hurricane Florence is capable of causing extensive significant damage.

Hurricane Florence will move through an environment favorable for strong hurricanes during the next 24 to 36 hours.  Florence will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  it will move through an area where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Hurricane Florence is likely to maintain its intensity and it could strengthen.  If another eyewall replacement cycle occurs, then there could be fluctuations in intensity.

Hurricane Florence will move around the western end of a subtropical high pressure system over the western Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer Florence toward the west-northwest during the next 24 to 36 hours.  On its anticipated track Hurricane Florence could approach the coast of the Carolinas later on Thursday.  The steering winds are forecast to weaken when Florence nears the coast and there is great uncertainty about the track when that occurs.  Hurricane Florence will bring strong winds to coastal North Carolina and eastern South Carolina.  Wind pushing water toward the shore will cause a significant storm surge.  A slow forward speed will mean that Hurricane Florence will drop a lot of rain and there is a risk of significant flooding of rivers and streams.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, Tropical Storm Isaac was speeding toward the Lesser Antilles and Hurricane Helene was weakening far south of the Azores.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Storm Isaac was located at latitude 14.5°N and longitude 52.3°W which put it about 580 miles (935 km) east of Martinique.  Isaac was moving toward the west at 16 m.p.h. (26 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 999 mb.  Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for Dominica, Martinique and Guadeloupe.  Tropical Storm Watches were in effect for Antigua, Montserrat, St. Kitts and Nevis, and Saba and St. Eustatius.

At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Hurricane Helene was located at latitude 18.0°N and longitude 35.4°W which put it about 1479 miles (2370 km) south-southwest of the Azores.  Helene was moving toward the northwest at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 120 m.p.h. (195 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 973 mb.