Tag Archives: Nova Scotia

Hurricane Dorian Brings Powerful Winds to Nova Scotia

Hurricane Dorian brought powerful winds to Nova Scotia on Saturday.  At 8:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Hurricane Dorian was located at latitude 45.0°N and longitude 67.9°W which put it about 45 miles (75 km) northeast of Halifax, Nova Scotia.  Dorian was moving toward the northeast at 30 m.p.h. (48 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 120 m.p.h. (195 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 960 mb.

Hurricane Warnings were in effect for Lower East Pubnico to Brule, Nova Scotia and from Indian Harbour to Hawke’s Bay, Newfoundland. Hurricane Watches were in effect for Prince Edward Island and for the Magdalen Islands. Tropical Storm Warnings were issued for Prince Edward Island and from Avonport to Lower East Pubnico, Nova Scotia. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for New Brunswick from Fundy National Park to Shediac. A Tropical Storm Warning was issued for the portion of the coast from Indian Harbour to Stone’s Cove, Newfoundland. Tropical Storm Warnings were issued for the portions of the coast from Hawke’s Bay to Fogo Island and from Mutton Bay to Mary’s Harbour.

Hurricane Dorian maintained its intensity and increased in size on Saturday while it sped across the northwestern Atlantic Ocean to the Canadian Maritime provinces.  Winds to hurricane force extended out about 115 miles (185 km) on the southern side of Hurricane Dorian.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 300 miles (480 km) from the center of circulation.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Hurricane Dorian was 16.5.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 26.3 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 42.8.  Hurricane Dorian was capable of causing widespread serious damage.

There were reports of wind damage and widespread power outages around Nova Scotia even before the center of Hurricane reached that area.  The large circulation around Dorian brought tropical storm force winds to Nova Scotia a few hours before the center made landfall.  The center of Hurricane Dorian officially made landfall south of Halifax, Nova Scotia on Saturday evening.

Hurricane Dorian had almost completed a transition to a large powerful extratropical cyclone.  That transition contributed to the increase in size of the circulation.  The strongest part of Hurricane Dorian will move across Nova Scotia during the next few hours.  The winds are likely to cause additional damage on Saturday night.  Hurricane Dorian will race across Nova Scotia, Cape Breton Island and New Brunswick on Saturday night.  Dorian will move over Newfoundland and southeastern Labrador on Sunday.  Hurricane Dorian has the potential to cause serious damage in all of those locations.

Hurricane Dorian Makes Landfall at Cape Hatteras, Threatens Canadian Maritimes

Hurricane Dorian made an official landfall at Cape Hatteras, North Carolina on Friday morning and posed a serious threat to the Canadian Maritime provinces.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Hurricane Dorian was located at latitude 36.9°N and longitude 72.7°W which put it about 330 miles (530 km) south-southwest of Nantucket, Massachusetts.  Dorian was moving toward the northeast at 24 m.p.h. (39 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 105 m.p.h. (165 km/h).  The minimum surace pressure was 958 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from the North Carolina/Virginia border to Fenwick Island, Delaware, and for Chesapeake Bay south of Drum Point.  A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Woods Hole to Sagamore Beach, Massachusetts including Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket.  A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Bar Harbor to Eastport, Maine.  A Hurricane Warning was in effect from Hubbards to Avonport, Nova Scotia.  A Hurricane Watch was issued for Prince Edward Island, Avonport to Hubbards, Nova Scotia, the Magdalen Islands, Parson’s Pond to Indian Harbour, Newfoundland.  Tropical Storm Warnings were issued for Prince Edward Island and from Avonport to Hubbards, Nova Scotia.  A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for New Brunswick from Fundy National Park to Shediac.  A Tropical Storm Watch was issued for Newfoundland from Francois to Boat Harbor.  A Tropical Storm Watch was  issued for the portion of the coast from Parson’s Pond to Triton, and from Indian Harbour to Stone’s Cove, Newfoundland.

The National Hurricane Center determined that the center of Hurricane Dorian passed over Cape Hatteras and identified that as the point of landfall.  Hurricane Dorian has been moving rapidly away from the coast since that time.  Hurricane Dorian remained a large, well organized hurricane.  A circular eye with a diameter of 35 miles (55 km) was apparent on satellite images.  The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Winds to hurricane force extended out about 80 miles (130 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 230 miles (370 km) from the center.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Hurricane Dorian was 13.9.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 23.3 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 43.2.

Hurricane Dorian will move through an environment favorable for intensification on Saturday.  Dorian will start out over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 27°C.  Dorian will move over cooler water later on Saturday.  An upper level trough over the eastern U.S. will contribute to upper level divergence, which may pump out enough mass to allow the surface pressure to decrease.  Hurricane Dorian will start to make a transition to an extratropical cyclone later on Saturday.  The interaction of colder and warmer air could also provide additional energy to the transitioning hurricane.  There is a chance that Hurricane Dorian could strengthen to a Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale on Saturday.

The upper level trough over the eastern U.S. will steer Hurricane Dorian rapidly toward the northeast during the weekend.  On its anticipated track, Dorian will pass southeast of Massachusetts on Saturday morning.  Hurricane Dorian could reach Nova Scotia by Saturday afternoon.  Dorian could be one of the strongest hurricanes to affect the Canadian Maritime provinces.  It will be capable of causing widespread serious damage.

Hurricane Dorian Brings Wind and Rain to the Carolinas

Hurricane Dorian brought wind and rain to the Carolinas on Thursday while the center move just off the coast.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Hurricane Dorian was located at latitude 33.6°N and longitude 77.4°W which put it about 70 miles southwest of Cape Lookout, North Carolina.  Dorian was moving toward the northeast at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 120 m.p.h. (195 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 958 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Edisto Beach, South Carolina to the North Carolina/Virginia border including Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds. Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the portion of the coast from the North Carolina/Virginia border to Fenwick Island, Delaware, for Chesapeake Bay south of Drum Point and for the Tidal Potomac south of Cobb Island. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Woods Hole to Sagamore Beach, Massachusetts including Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket. A Hurricane Watch has been issued for all of Nova Scotia. Tropical Storm Watches have been issued for Prince Edward Island, for the Magdalen Islands and for New Brunswick from Fundy National Park to Shediac. A Tropical Storm Watch was issued for Newfoundland from Francois to Boat Harbor.

Hurricane Dorian weakened very slowly on Thursday while the center of circulation moved just off the coast.  The pressure remained nearly steady around 958 mb.  A circular eye with a diameter of 35 miles (55 km) was at the center of circulation.  A ring of thunderstorms surrounded the eye and the strongest winds were in that ring of storms.  Winds to hurricane force extended out about 60 miles (95 km) from the center of Hurricane Dorian.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 220 miles (330 km) from the center.

The core of Hurricane Dorian with the strongest winds remained over the Atlantic Ocean.  Numerous location along the coast of South Carolina and North Carolina reported winds to topical storm force.  Rainbands rotating around the northern half of Dorian dropped locally heavy rain over coastal areas of South Carolina and North Carolina.  Thunderstorms in some of the bands generated tornadoes and there were scattered reports of wind damage.  Hurricane Dorian caused a storm surge of 4 to 7 feet (1.3 to 2.3 meters) along the coast.

An upper level trough over the eastern U.S. began to steer Hurricane Dorian toward the northeast.  Dorian began to move faster later on Thursday.  The upper level trough will steer Hurricane Dorian rapidly toward the northeast during the next few days.  On its anticipated track Dorian will bring wind and rain to eastern North Carolina on Friday.  Dorian will also cause a storm surge along the coast.  Hurricane Dorian will pass southeast of New England on Friday night.  Dorian will bring wind and rain to the Canadian Maritime provinces and Newfoundland during the weekend.

Tropical Storm Dorian Moves Toward Puerto Rico

Tropical Storm Dorian moved toward Puerto Rico on Tuesday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Storm Dorian was located at latitude 16.0°N and longitude 63.0°W which put it about 275 miles (440 km) east-southeast of Ponce, Puerto Rico.  Dorian was moving toward the northwest at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1006 mb.

A Hurricane Watch was issued for Puerto Rico.  Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for Puerto Rico, Culebra, Vieques, the U.S. Virgin Islands and the British Virgin Islands.  A Tropical Storm Watch was issued for the coast of the Dominican Republic from Isla Saona to Puerto Plata.

The original low level center of Tropical Storm Dorian passed south of Barbados and St. Lucia on Tuesday morning.  Dorian dropped heavy rain and there were reports of flash floods on Martinique.  The original center weakened on Tuesday afternoon and a new low level center formed about 60 miles farther to the north.  The formation of a new center of circulation caused the forecast future track of Tropical Storm Dorian to be shifted northward as well.

Even with the formation of a new center of circulation, the overall circulation around Tropical Storm Dorian did not change much on Tuesday.  The circulation around Dorian remained small.  Winds to tropical storm force only extended out about 45 miles (75 km) from the center of circulation.  A broken ring of thunderstorms surrounded the new low level center.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving the center of Tropical Storm Dorian.  Storms near the center were producing upper level divergence which was pumping mass away to the north of the tropical storm.

Tropical Storm Dorian will move through an environment somewhat favorable for intensification on Wednesday.  Dorian will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  An upper level low northwest of Puerto Rico will produce southerly winds which will blow toward the top of the circulation.  Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear, which will inhibit intensification.  A large mass of drier air is north of Tropical Storm Dorian and the drier air could also inhibit intensification if it gets pulled into the circulation around Dorian.  The small size of the circulation around Tropical Storm Dorian means that it could weaken or strengthen quickly if the environmental conditions change significantly.  Dorian is likely to weaken when it crosses Puerto Rico on Wednesday night.

The upper low northwest of Puerto Rico will help to steer Tropical Storm Dorian toward the northwest on Wednesday.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Dorian could reach Puerto Rico by Wednesday evening.  Dorian will bring gusty winds and it will drop locally heavy rain on Puerto Rico.  Locally heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations.  A high pressure system will build north of Tropical Storm Dorian on Thursday and Friday.  The high will turn Dorian back toward the west-northwest.  Dorian could approach the east coast of Florida on Sunday.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, Tropical Depression Six strengthened into Tropical Storm Erin southeast of Cape Hatteras on Tuesday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Storm Erin was located at latitude 31.9°N and longitude 72.1°W which put it about 300 miles (485 km) southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.  Erin was moving toward the west at 2 m.p.h. (3 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (65 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1005 mb.  Tropical Storm Erin is forecast to move northeast toward Nova Scotia.

Tropical Storm Chantal Forms Southeast of Nova Scotia

Tropical Storm Chantal formed southeast of Nova Scotia on Tuesday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Storm Chantal was located at latitude 40.2°N and longitude 56.2°W which put it about 485 miles (780 km) southeast of Halifax, Nova Scotia.  Chantal was moving toward the east at 22 m.p.h. (35 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1010 mb.

A small low pressure system that was near the coast of the Carolinas during the weekend began to exhibit tropical characteristics on Tuesday night and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Storm Chantal.  Thunderstorms developed closer to the center of circulation when the low moved near the Gulf Stream and the strongest winds were occurring closer to the center.  Although the circulation around Chantal looked more tropical, the distribution of thunderstorms was still asymmetrical.  Many of the stronger storms were occurring in the eastern half of the circulation.  Bands in the western half of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.  Tropical Storm Chantal was far enough north that it was in the region of westerly winds in the upper levels.  Those winds were causing moderate vertical wind shear and they were the primary reason for the asymmetrical distribution of thunderstorms.

Tropical Storm Chantal will move through an environment only marginally favorable for intensification during the next several days.  Chantal will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 25°C.  It will continue to be in a region of moderate westerly winds in the upper levels, which will cause vertical wind shear.  Tropical Storm Chantal could intensify slowly if the upper level winds do not get any stronger.  However, Chantal could weaken if the upper level winds do get stronger.

Tropical Storm Chantal will move around the northern end of a ridge in the middle troposphere over the Atlantic Ocean.  The ridge will steer Chantal toward the east during the next 24 hours.  Chantal could move more toward the southeast on Thursday when it nears the western end of the ridge.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Chantal is forecast to make a slow loop in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean.

Beryl Reorganizes as a Subtropical Storm North of Bermuda

A low pressure system associated with former Tropical Storm Beryl reorganized north of Bermuda on Saturday and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Subtropical Storm Beryl.  At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Subtropical Storm Beryl was located at latitude 36.4°N and longitude 65.7°W which put it about 575 miles (930 km) south-southwest of Halifax, Nova Scotia.  Beryl was moving toward the northeast at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1010 mb.

The remnants of former Tropical Storm Beryl moved slowly across the northern Caribbean Sea and then over the southeastern Bahamas to a position northwest of Bermuda.  A low pressure system formed at the surface.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms developed and began to revolve around the the low pressure system.  The low pressure system moved under the eastern side of an upper level trough.  The trough contains colder air in the upper levels and it was also producing southwesterly winds which were blowing toward the top of the surface low pressure system.  The southwesterly winds were generating moderate vertical wind shear and the strongest rainbands were occurring on the eastern side of the surface low.  Some drier air was moving around the western and southern part of the upper level trough, which may have contributed to the weaker bands on the western side of the circulation.  The presence of the upper level trough and the asymmetrical distribution of thunderstorms around the surface low prompted the National Hurricane Center to designate the system as a subtropical storm.

Subtropical Storm Beryl will move through an environment marginally favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours.  Beryl will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 26°C.  The upper level trough will continue to produce moderate vertical wind shear.  The wind shear and the drier air will inhibit intensification.  Subtropical Storm Beryl could intensify a little more during the next 24 hours.  Beryl will move over colder water later on Sunday and it will start to weaken when that occurs.

The upper level trough was steering Subtropical Storm Beryl toward the northeast and a general motion in that direction is forecast to continue for several more days.  On its anticipated track Subtropical Storm Beryl will pass south of Nova Scotia on Sunday.  Beryl could be near Newfoundland by Tuesday.

Hurricane Chris Weakens South of Nova Scotia

Hurricane Chris weakened slowly on Wednesday as it passed well south of Nova Scotia.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Hurricane Chris was located at latitude 39.6°N and longitude 63.0°W.  Chris was moving toward the northeast at 29 m.p.h. (46 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (140 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 980 mb.

Hurricane Chris exhibited the structure of a hurricane on Thursday, but the clouds did not rise quite as high because it was over slightly cooler water.  There was still an eye at the center of circulation.  Several bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of the circulation.  The rainbands were weaker in the southwestern part of the hurricane because some drier air was entering that part of the circulation.  Storms in the core of the circulation were generating upper level divergence.

Hurricane Chris is likely to weaken again on Thursday.  It will start to move over much cooler water where there is less energy in the upper ocean.  In addition an upper level trough over the eastern U.S. will produce southwesterly winds which will blow toward the upper part of the hurricane.  Those winds will cause strong vertical wind shear.  The shear will undercut the upper level divergence and tilt the circulation toward the northeast with height.  Hurricane Chris will start to make a transition to an extratropical cyclone when the effects of the cooler water and stronger shear begin to alter the structure of the hurricane.

The upper level trough was steering Hurricane Chris rapidly toward the northeast and that motion is expected to continue for several more days.  On its anticipated track Hurricane Chris will be near Labrador on Thursday night.  The extratropical cyclone that results from the transition of Hurricane Chris will be near Iceland during the weekend.

Chris Strengthens to a Hurricane Southeast of Cape Hatteras

Former Tropical Storm Chris strengthened to a hurricane southeast of Cape Hatteras on Tuesday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Hurricane Chris was located at latitude 33.7°N and longitude 72.4°W which put it about 205 miles (330 km) east-southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.  Chris was moving toward the northeast at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 980 mb.

Hurricane Chris strengthened on Tuesday when it moved northeast of cooler water Chris had mixed to the surface while it was meandering off the coast of the Carolinas.  An eye with a diameter of 30 miles (50 km) formed at the center of circulation.  A ring of strong thunderstorms surrounded the eye and the strongest winds were occurring in the eastern side of that ring of storms.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hurricane Chris.  The strongest rainbands were in the eastern half of the circulation.  Drier air near the western half of the circulation was contributing to the weaker bands in that part of the hurricane.  Storms in the core of the circulation were generating upper level divergence which was pumping mass away to the north and east of the hurricane.  Winds to hurricane force extended out about 20 miles (30 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 95 miles (155 km) from the center.

Hurricane Chris will move through an environment favorable for intensification on Wednesday.  Chris will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  An upper level trough over the northeastern U.S. will produce southwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of the hurricane.  The winds speeds are similar at most levels and they will not generate a lot of vertical wind shear during the next 24 hours.  Hurricane Chris will strengthen on Wednesday and it could intensify rapidly.  Chris will move over cooler water when it gets north of the Gulf Stream and it will start to weaken when that occurs.

The trough over the northeastern U.S. will steer Hurricane Chris toward the northeast.  On its anticipated track Chris will move away from the coast of North Carolina.  Chris could be south of Nova Scotia in about 36 hours and it could be near Newfoundland in several days.

Elsewhere, the remnants of former Tropical Storm Beryl crossed Hispaniola and they were moving toward the southeastern Bahamas.  At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Former Tropical Storm Chris was located at latitude 20.1°N and longitude 72.6°W which put it about 40 miles (65 km) northeast of Port de Paix, Haiti.  It was moving toward the northwest at 17 m.p.h. (28 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1013 mb.  A reconnaissance aircraft is scheduled to investigate the system on Wednesday if there are signs that it could be reorganizing into a tropical cyclone.

Hurricane Gert Intensifies to Cat. 2 South of Nova Scotia

Hurricane Gert intensified to Category 2 on the Saffir-Simpson Scale as it sped over the Gulf Stream south of Nova Scotia on Wednesday afternoon.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Hurricane Gert was located at latitude 38.7°N and longitude 62.4°W which put it about 410 miles (665 km) south of Halifax, Nova Scotia.  Gert was moving toward the northeast at 31 m.p.h. (50 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 100 mp.h. (160 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 120 m.p.h. (195 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 970 mb.

Although Hurricane Gert is at a fairly high latitude, it has the classic structure of a Hurricane.  There is a fairly small eye at the center of circulation.  The eye is surround by a ring of strong thunderstorm and the strongest winds are occurring in this ring of thunderstorms.  There are additional bands of showers and thunderstorms revolving around the core of the hurricane.  The circulation is symmetrical and thunderstorms in the core are producing upper level divergence which is pumping away mass to the northeast of the hurricane.  Winds to hurricane force extend out about 40 miles (65 km) primarily to the east of the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extend out about 140 miles (225 km) from the center.

Hurricane Gert is moving over the Gulf Stream which means it is moving over water where the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) is near 28.5°C.  An upper level trough west of Gert is producing southwesterly winds which are blowing toward the top of the hurricane.  However, there is not much change of wind speed with height, which means that there is little vertical wind shear.  The combination of the warm water of the Gulf Stream and little vertical shear, allowed Hurricane Gert to strengthen on Wednesday.

Hurricane Gert could intensify during the next few hours, but it will soon move into a much less favorable environment.  Gert will soon move north of the Gulf Stream where the SSTs are much cooler.  The upper level trough is moving closer to Hurricane Gert and the winds are the upper level are forecast to get stronger.  When those winds increase, there will be much more vertical wind shear.  Colder water and more wind shear will cause Hurricane Gert to weaken on Thursday.  Gert could make a transition to an extratropical cyclone in colder environment of the North Atlantic.

Southwesterly winds in the upper level trough are steering Hurricane  Gert quickly toward the northeast and that general motion is expected to continue.  On its anticipated track, Hurricane Gert will move south of Labrador and Greenland.

Even as Hurricane Gert speeds away over the North Atlantic three new tropical waves over the tropical Atlantic have the potential to develop into tropical cyclones.  A tropical wave about 800 miles (1290 km) east of the Lesser Antilles designated as Invest 91L showed signs of organization on Wednesday.  A few more thunderstorms developed closed to the center of circulation.  A reconnaissance plane is scheduled to investigate this system on Thursday.  A little farther to the east another tropical wave designated Invest 92L was also showing evidence or more organization.  A third tropical wave just west of Africa also has the potential to develop during the next few days.

Tropical Storm Claudette Forms Southeast of New England

An area of low pressure off the East Coast of the U.S. rapidly acquired tropical characteristics on Monday and it was classified as Tropical Storm Claudette by the National Hurricane Center.  At 1:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Storm Claudette was located at latitude 37.4°N and longitude 68.1°W which put it about 290 miles (465 km) south-southeast of Nantucket Island, Massachusetts and about 550 miles (885 km) south-southwest of Halifax, Nova Scotia.  Claudette was moving toward the northeast at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed as 50 m.p.h. (85 km/h) and there were gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1004 mb.

Claudette began as a small low pressure system along a nearly stationary frontal boundary off the East Coast of the U.S.  Moderate wind shear kept the system looking non-tropical for much of the weekend.  The wind shear decreased on Monday morning and as the low moved over the warmer water of the Gulf Stream, thunderstorms developed near the center of circulation.  The stationary frontal boundary dissipated and the system took on a more tropical appearance.  Latent energy released in thunderstorms near the center produced the development of a warm core and some banding developed in the eastern portion of the circulation.  As a result of those changes, the system was classified as Tropical Storm Claudette.

Claudette could strengthen in the short term.  It is still over the Gulf Stream and the upper level winds are not too strong.  However, once the tropical storm moves north of latitude 40°N, it will move over cooler Sea Surface Temperatures.  In addition, stronger upper level winds will increase the vertical wind shear in a day or two.  Claudette could make a transition to an extratropical cyclone within 48 hours.

A combination of a trough approaching the eastern U.S, and a ridge over the Atlantic are expected to steer Claudette toward the northeast.  On its anticipated track, Claudette could approach eastern Nova Scotia in about 24 hours and Labrador in 30 hours.