Tag Archives: SH05

Tropical Cyclone Owen Redevelops Over Gulf of Carpentaria

After meandering westward over the Coral Sea last week and crossing northern Queensland, Tropical Cyclone Owen redeveloped over the Gulf of Carpentaria on Tuesday.  At 10:00 a.m. EST on Tuesday the center of Tropical Cyclone Owen was located at latitude 14.9°S and longitude 138.4°E which put it about 135 miles (215 km) north-northwest of Mornington Island, Australia.  Owen was moving toward the west-northwest at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 993 mb.

The circulation around Tropical Cyclone Owen exhibited increased organization after it moved over the Gulf of Carpentaria and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology reclassified the system as a tropical cyclone on Tuesday.  A band of showers and thunderstorms was wrapping around the southern and western sides of the center of circulation and the strongest winds were occurring in that band of storms.  Other bands of showers and thunderstorms were strengthening over the Gulf of Carpentaria.  Storms near the center of circulation started to generate upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the tropical cyclone.

A Tropical Cyclone Warning is in effect for the portion of the coast from Cape Shield, Northern Territory to Burketown, Queensland including Groote Eylandt and Mornington Island.

Tropical Cyclone Owen will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next several days.  Owen will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  It will move in an area between an upper level ridge north of Australia and a larger upper level ridge over the South Pacific Ocean where the upper level winds are weaker.  There will be some vertical wind shear, but the wind shear will not be strong enough to prevent intensification.  Tropical Cyclone Owen will intensify during the next two days and it could strengthen into the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon.

The ridge north of Australia will steer Tropical Cyclone Owen toward the west-northwest during the next 24 hours.  On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone Owen could be near Groote Eylandt in about 24 hours.  An upper level trough over Western Australia will move eastward and the trough will cause the winds in the steering levels to weaken in a day or so.  Owen could drift slowly southward for 12 to 24 hours when that happens.  Eventually, westerly winds blowing around the northern end of the trough are forecast to turn Tropical Cyclone Owen back toward the east.

Tropical Cyclone Owen could bring gusty winds and drop locally heavy rain over Groote Eylandt when it passes nearby.  If Owen drifts southward as expected, it could also bring gusty winds and heavy rain to the western coast of the Gulf of Carpentaria near Port McArthur.

Former Tropical Cyclone Owen Drops Rain on Northern Queensland

After meandering westward across the Coral Sea during the past week a low pressure system formerly designated as Tropical Cyclone Owen dropped rain on northern Queensland on Sunday.  At 7:00 p.m. EST on Sunday the center of former Tropical Cyclone Owen was located at latitude 15.7°S and longitude 144.5°E which put it about 75 miles (120 km) west of Cairns, Australia.  Owen was moving toward the west-northwest at 7 m.p.h.  The maximum sustained wind speed was 25 m.p.h. (40 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1006 mb.

Although it is no longer formally designated as a tropical cyclone, the low pressure center that was Tropical Cyclone Owen maintains a distinct low level center of circulation.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms are revolving around the center.  Some of those bands are moving inland over northern Queensland and they are dropping locally heavy rainfall.  Flooding could develop in areas that receive persistent heavy rain.

Flood Watches are in effect for the Mulgrave River, Russell River, Johnstone River, Murray River, Tully River, and Herbert River.

Former Tropical Storm Owen is forecast to move toward the west-northwest across the Cape York Peninsula.  It could emerge over the Gulf of Carpentaria early in the week.  There is a possibility that the low pressure system could strengthen when it moves back over water.

 

Tropical Cyclone Owen Develops Over the Coral Sea

Tropical Cyclone Owen developed over the Coral Sea on Sunday.  Thunderstorms developed near the center of a tropical low over the Coral Sea and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology designated the system as Tropical Cyclone Owen.  At 4:00 p.m. EST on Sunday the center of Tropical Cyclone Owen was located at latitude 15.4°S and longitude 154.9°E which put it about 615 miles (990 km) east of Cairns, Australia.  Owen was moving toward the south at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 996 mb.

The circulation of Tropical Cyclone Owen became better organized on Sunday.  A band of thunderstorms wrapped around the eastern and southern sides of the center of circulation.  Additional bands of showers and thunderstorms were developing in the eastern half of the circulation.  Bands in the western half of Tropical Cyclone Owen consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.  Storms near the center of circulation were generating upper level divergence which was pumping mass away to the east of the tropical cyclone.

Tropical Cyclone Owen will move through an environment marginally favorable for intensification during the next 24 to 36 hours.  Owen will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds will blow from the west.  Those winds will blow toward the top of the circulation and they are already causing moderate vertical wind shear.  The wind shear is the likely reason why most of the stronger thunderstorms are developing in the eastern half of the circulation.  The westerly winds will inhibit upper level divergence to the west of the tropical cyclone and the wind shear will limit intensification.  Tropical Cyclone Owen could strengthen during the next day or two, but the wind shear is likely to weaken Owen later this week.

Tropical Cyclone Owen will move north of a subtropical ridge in the middle troposphere.  The ridge is forecast to turn Owen toward the west and to steer the tropical cyclone toward the west during the next few days.  On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone Owen is forecast to move slowly westward during the next several days.  Owen could be east of Willis Island in three or four days.

Tropical Cyclone Berguitta Strengthens Over South Indian Ocean

Tropical Cyclone Berguitta strengthened over the South Indian Ocean on Saturday.  At 10:00 p.m. EST on Saturday the center of Tropical Cyclone Berguitta was located at latitude 18.2°S and longitude 63.3°E which put it about 420 miles (675 km) east-northeast of Port Louis, Mauritius.  Berguitta was moving toward the west at 5 m.p.h. (8 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 994 mb.

The structure of Tropical Cyclone Berguitta organized quickly on Saturday.  An eye appeared on microwave satellite images of the center of circulation.  An elliptical ring of showers and thunderstorms surrounded the eye.  Several bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Tropical Cyclone Berguitta.  There were more thunderstorms south and east of the center of circulation.  Storms near the core of Berguitta were generating upper level divergence which was pumping away mass.  The removal of mass allowed the surface pressure to decrease and the winds speeds to increase.

Tropical Cyclone Berguitta will be moving through an environment favorable for intensification during the next several days.  Berguitta will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  It will move through an area where the upper level winds are weak and there is little vertical wind shear.  Tropical Cyclone Berguitta will likely intensify into the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon during the next 24 hours.  It could intensify more rapidly once the eye and inner core become fully organized.

A subtropical ridge south of Berguitta is steering the tropical cyclone slowly toward the west.  A general motion toward the west is expected during the next day or two.  In about 48 hours Tropical Cyclone Berguitta will be closer to the western end of the ridge and it could start to move more toward the southwest.  On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone Berguitta could approach Mauritius and La Reunion in three or four days.  Berguitta could be the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon at that time.

Elsewhere in the southern hemisphere former Tropical Cyclone Joyce continued to drop locally heavy rain over parts of Western Australia.  At 10:00 p.m. EST on Saturday the center of former Tropical Cyclone Joyce was located at latitude 25.4°S and longitude 115.6°E which put it about 35 miles (55 km) southeast of Gascoyne Junction.  Former Tropical Cyclone Joyce was moving toward the west-southwest at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 30 m.p.h. (50 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 998 mb.  The locally heavy rain was creating the potential for flooding in some locations.

Tropical Cyclone Joyce Brings Wind and Rain to Western Australia

Tropical Cyclone Joyce brought wind and rain to Western Australia on Thursday.  At 10:00 p.m. EST on Thursday the center of Tropical Cyclone Joyce was located at latitude 19.6°S and longitude 120.9°E which put it about 20 miles (35 km) northeast of Wallal Downs, Australia.  Joyce was moving toward the southwest at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 989 mb.

The center of Tropical Cyclone Joyce moved along the coast of Western Australia from Bidyadanga toward Wallal Downs on Thursday.  Tropical Cyclone Joyce brought gusty winds up to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) to portions of the coast.  The fact that almost half the circulation of Joyce was flowing over land kept the tropical cyclone from intensifying significantly.  Several bands of showers and thunderstorms were occurring in the southwestern half of the circulation.  Fewer showers and thunderstorms were in the northeastern half of Tropical Cyclone Joyce, except for a couple of small bands in the periphery of the circulation near Cape Leveque.

Tropical Cyclone Joyce is being steered toward the southwest by a subtropical ridge and that motion is expected to continue for several more days.  On its anticipated track the center of Joyce will move inland near Wallal Downs.  It will continue inland on Friday and the center will pass near Shay Gap and Marble Bar.  A Tropical Cyclone Warning is in effect for the portion of the coast from Bidyadanga to De Grey.  Tropical Cyclone Joyce will gradually weaken when it moves inland, but it will continue to drop locally heavy rain over parts of Western Australia when it moves inland.  The Australian Bureau of Meteorology has issued Flood Warnings and Watches for portions of Western Australia.

Tropical Cyclone Joyce Develops Near Western Australia

Tropical Cyclone Joyce developed near Western Australia on Wednesday when a Tropical Low moved over the South Indian Ocean.  At 10:00 p.m. EST on Wednesday the center of Tropical Cyclone Joyce was located near latitude 17.0°S and longitude 121.6°E which put it about 80 miles (125 km) north-northwest of Broome, Australia.  Joyce was moving toward the south-southwest at 5 m.p.h. (7 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 990 mb.

A Tropical Low moved from Western Australia off the coast and over the warm water of the South Indian Ocean on Wednesday.  The circulation of the system organized after the center moved over water and the inner core became more well developed.  The Australian Bureau of Meteorology designated the system as Tropical Cyclone Joyce.  A Tropical Cyclone Warning was issued for the portion of the coast from Cape Leveque to De Grey including Broome and adjacent inland parts of Western Australia.  A Tropical Cyclone Watch was issued for the portion of the coast from De Grey to Dampier including Port Headland, Karratha and adjacent inland areas.

The circulation of Tropical Cyclone Joyce exhibited the classical appearance of an organizing tropical cyclone on Wednesday.  There was a well defined low level center of circulation.  Numerous bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the center of circulation.  Storms in the core of Joyce were generating upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the tropical cyclone.

Tropical Cyclone Joyce will be moving through an environment favorable for intensification during the next day or so.  Joyce will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  The upper level winds are weak and there is little vertical wind shear.  Warm water and little vertical wind shear will allow Joyce to strengthen and it could intensify rapidly.  Tropical Cyclone Joyce is forecast to strengthen into the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon during the next 36 hours.

Tropical Cyclone Joyce is moving around the western end of a subtropical ridge which is steering Joyce toward the south-southwest.  The ridge is forecast to steer Joyce in a general southwesterly direction during the next several days.   On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Cyclone Joyce could make landfall on the coast of western Australia between Wallal Downs and De Grey in about 36 hours.

Tropical Cyclone Dineo Makes Landfall in Mozambique

Tropical Cyclone Dineo made landfall on the coast of Mozambique near Massinga on Wednesday.  Dineo intensified prior to landfall.  The maximum sustained wind speed at the time of landfall was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 105 m.p.h. (170 km/h).  Tropical Cyclone Dineo was capable of causing minor wind damage.  It may have produced a storm surge near and to the south of where the center made landfall.  Tropical Cyclone Dineo is producing locally heavy rain as it moves inland over Mozambique.

At 10:00 p.m. EST on Wednesday the center of Tropical Cyclone Dineo was located at latitude 23.3°N and longitude 33.6°E which put it about 125 miles (205 km) west-northwest of Inhambane, Mozambique.  Dineo was moving toward the west at 11 m.p.h. (17 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 70 m.p.h.  (110 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 981.

Even though it has moved inland the structure of Tropical Cyclone Dineo is still very well organized.  The remnants of the eye and the eyewall are still visible on satellite imagery.  There are several rainbands rotating around the core of Tropical Cyclone Dineo.  The strongest winds are occurring in thunderstorms in the bands that are still offshore over the Indian Ocean.  The thunderstorms near the center of Dineo are still generating upper level divergence which is pumping mass away from the core of the tropical cyclone.

Tropical Cyclone Dineo will continue to weaken slowly as it moves farther inland.  The atmospheric environment is favorable for a tropical cyclone.  The upper level winds are weak and there is little vertical wind shear.  However, now that the core of Dineo is inland, it is away from the warm water of the Indian Ocean which fueled the tropical cyclone’s intensification.  So, Tropical Cyclone Dineo will spin down, but at a slower rate than occurs with some landfalling tropical cyclones.

A subtropical ridge is steering Tropical Cyclone Dineo toward the west and that general motion is expected to continue.  On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Cyclone Dineo could pass near Dindiza, Chigubo and Mapai in Mozambique.  Dineo could produce locally heavy rain when it moves over those areas.  Tropical Cyclone Dineo or its remnants could also bring locally heavy rain to parts of northern South Africa, southern Zimbabwe and eastern Botswana.

Tropical Cyclone Dineo Intensifies As It Nears Mozambique

Tropical Cyclone Dineo intensified on Tuesday as it moved closer to Mozambique.  At 10:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday the center of Tropical Cyclone Dineo was located at latitude 22.8°S and longitude 37.5°E which put it about 160 miles (260 km) east-northeast of Inhambane, Mozambique.  Dineo was moving toward the west-southwest at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 70 m.p.h. (110 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 981 mb.

Tropical Cyclone Dineo intensified on Tuesday and it was on the verge of reaching the intensity of a hurricane/typhoon.  A primary rainband wrapped most of the way around a circular eye.  There was a break on the western side of the developing eyewall.  The strongest winds were occurring in thunderstorms in the eyewall.  Several other bands of showers and thunderstorms were rotating around the core of Tropical Cyclone Dineo.  Thunderstorms around the core of Dineo were generating upper level divergence which was transporting mass away from the center of the tropical cyclone.

Tropical Cyclone Dineo will move through a favorable environment until it reaches Mozambique.  Dineo will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  The upper level winds are weak and there is little vertical wind shear.  The favorable environment will allow Tropical Cyclone Dineo to continue to intensify during the next 12 to 18 hours.  It will become the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon on Wednesday.

A subtropical ridge is steering Tropical Cyclone Dineo toward the west-southwest and that general motion is expected to continue for another 12 to 24 hours.  On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone Dineo is expected to make landfall on the coast of Mozambique north of Inhambane in less than 24 hours.  Tropical Cyclone Dineo will be the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon when it makes landfall.  Dineo will bring strong winds and locally heavy rain when it moves into Mozambique.  Heavy rain could create the potential for flash floods.  Tropical Cyclone Dineo will also produce a storm surge along the coast.  The highest storm surge will occur south of where the center makes landfall as the clockwise rotation pushes water toward the coast.

Tropical Cyclone Dineo Moves Toward Mozambique

Tropical Cyclone Dineo started to move slowly toward Mozambique on Monday.  At 10:00 p.m. EST on Monday the center of Tropical Cyclone Dineo was located at latitude 22.0°S and longitude 38.9°E which put it about 265 miles (430 km) east-northeast of Inhambane, Mozambique.  Dineo was moving toward the west-southwest at 6 m.p.h. (10 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 994 mb.

The circulation of Tropical Cyclone Dineo became more organized on Monday.  A primary rainband wrapped tightly around the eastern side of the center of circulation.  Recent microwave satellite imagery hinted at the formation of an eye at the center of circulation and a broken eyewall around the developing eye.  The strongest winds were occurring in thunderstorms in the primary rainband.  Additional bands of thunderstorms developed in the eastern half of the circulation.  A few thunderstorms formed west of the center, but most of the bands in that part of the circulation consist of low clouds and showers.  There may be some drier air in the western part of the circulation and the drier air may be inhibiting the development of thunderstorms in that region.  The thunderstorms near the center of circulation are generating upper level divergence.

Tropical Cyclone Dineo will be moving through a favorable environment during the next 24 hours.  It will be moving over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  An upper level ridge centered over southern Africa will produce southwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of the circulation.  Those winds will produce some wind shear and they will limit upper level divergence on the western side of the circulation.  While the wind shear may slow the rate of intensification during the next 24 hours, Tropical Cyclone Dineo should strengthen on Tuesday.  Dineo could intensify into the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon before it reaches the coast of Mozambique.

Tropical Cyclone Dineo is near the western end of a subtropical ridge which is steering it slowly toward the west-northwest.  That ridge is expected to continue to steer Tropical Cyclone Dineo toward the west-northwest during the next 12 to 24 hours.  Eventually, the ridge is expected to get stronger and extend westward.  When that happens, the ridge could steer Dineo more toward the west.  On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone Dineo could approach the coast of Mozambique north of Inhambane in 24 to 30 hours.

Tropical Cyclone Dineo could be the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon when it reaches Mozambique.  It will bring gusty winds and heavy rain to parts of Mozambique.  Dineo could also generate a storm surge at the coast when it makes landfall.

Tropical Cyclone 05S Forms Over Mozambique Channel

A surface circulation organized quickly inside a low pressure system over the Mozambique Channel on Sunday and the system was designated as Tropical Cyclone 05S.  At 7:00 p.m. EST on Sunday the center or Tropical Cyclone 05S was located at latitude 21.6°N and longitude 39.9°E which put it about 540 miles (870 km) northeast of Maputo, Mozambique.  Tropical Cyclone 05S was moving toward the south-southwest at 5 m.p.h. (8 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1000 mb.

Tropical Cyclone 05S has a tight center of circulation, but the distribution of thunderstorms is asymmetrical.  Multiple bands of thunderstorms developed in the eastern half of the circulation.  The strongest winds are occurring in the bands of thunderstorms.  However, there are mainly showers and a few isolated thunderstorms in the bands in the western half of the circulation.  The thunderstorms in the bands east of the center of circulation are beginning to generate upper level divergence.

Tropical Cyclone 05S will be moving through a favorable environment during the next several days.  It will be moving over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  Tropical Cyclone 05S is underneath an upper level ridge.  The upper level winds are weak and there is not much vertical wind shear.  There may be some drier air in the western half of the circulation and that is the only inhibiting factor in the environment around Tropical Cyclone 05S.  Given the mostly favorable environment Tropical Cyclone 05S is likely to intensify during the next day or two.  If an inner core becomes fully developed, then a period of rapid intensification may be possible.

Tropical Cyclone 05S is currently in an area of weak steering currents because of its position underneath the upper level ridge.  Some global models are indicating that a track toward the southwest could be possible if the tropical cyclone moves closer to the western portion of the ridge.  On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone 05S could move in the general direction of Mozambique.