Tag Archives: Shikoku

Tropical Storm Saola Speeding Toward Tokyo

Tropical Storm Saola sped toward Tokyo, Japan on Saturday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Saola was located at latitude 32.4°N and longitude 134.4°E which put it about 370 miles (595 km) west-southwest of Tokyo.  Saola was moving toward the northeast at 24 m.p.h. (39 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 70 m.p.h. (110 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 979 mb.

Tropical Storm Saola was weakening and making a transition to an extratropical cyclone.  A primary band of showers and thunderstorms wrapped around the eastern side of the circulation.  There were other thinner bands of showers revolving around the core of the circulation.  Strong westerly winds in the upper levels were causing significant vertical wind shear which was tilting the upper part of the circulation toward the northeast.  Cooler drier air appeared to be flowing toward the western part of the circulation.

Westerly winds in the middle latitudes were steering Tropical Storm Saola quickly toward the northeast.  The center of Saola will pass south of Shikoku.  On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Storm Saola will pass near Tokyo in about 12 hours.  Tropical Storm Saola will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to Shikoku and central Honshu.  The heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations.

Typhoon Saola Near Okinawa

The core of Typhoon Saola moved near Okinawa on Friday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Typhoon Saola was near latitude 26.2°N and longitude 128.2°E which put it about 70 miles (110 km) south of Okinawa.  Saola was moving toward the north at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 979 mb.

The circulation of Typhoon Saola became more well organized on Friday.   The primary rainband wrapped most of the way around the center of circulation.  A large eye was surrounded by a broken ring of showers and thunderstorms.  Low clouds and showers were scattered throughout the large eye.  Several other bands of showers and storms were revolving around the core of Typhoon Saola.  The rainbands were weaker on the northwestern side of Typhoon Saola and there appeared to be cooler, drier air on that side of the typhoon.  Winds to typhoon force extended out about 50 miles (80 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 200 miles (320 km) from the center.

Typhoon Saola could be near its maximum intensity.  Saola will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  However Typhoon Saola is near the upper level westerly winds in the middle latitudes and the vertical wind shear will increase on Saturday.  Typhoon Saola could strengthen a little more during the next six to twelve hours, but it will start to weaken when the vertical wind shear increases.

Typhoon Saola is moving around the western end of a ridge which is steering Saola toward the north.  When Typhoon Saola reaches the westerly winds of the middle latitudes, those winds will turn Saola toward the east-northeast.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Saola will bring strong winds and heavy rain to Okinawa and the Ryukyu Islands.  The center of Typhoon Saola will be near southern Kyushu in about 12 hours and the center could pass near Tokyo in about 24 hours.

Tropical Storm Talim Making Landfall on Kyushu

Tropical Storm Talim made landfall on Kyushu near Yamagawa, Japan on Saturday night.  Heavy rain was already falling over parts of Kyushu and Shikoku.  At 9:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Talim was located at latitude 30.8°N and longitude 130.2°E which put it about 60 miles (95 km) southwest of Kagoshima, Japan.  Talim was moving toward the east-northeast at 18 m.p.h. (30 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 975 mb.

Tropical Storm Talim was a powerful typhoon several days ago.  Talim was nearly stationary over the same part of the Pacific Ocean for nearly 48 hours.  Talim’s winds mixed cooler water to the surface and it weakened to a tropical storm.  Tropical Storm still has a well organized circulation and winds to tropical storm force extend out about 200 miles (320 km) from the center of circulation.  Drier air wrapped around the southern half of the circulation.  Most of the thunderstorms and heavy rain are occurring in the northern half of the circulation.

An upper level trough over eastern Asia is steering Tropical Storm Talim toward the east-northeast.  The trough should steer Talim more toward the northeast during the next several days.  On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Storm Talim will move over southern Kyushu, Shikoku and Honshu.  Talim will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain when it moves across those areas.  The heavy rain could produce flash flooding in some locations.

Typhoon Noru Skirts Coast of Shikoku on Way to Honshu

The eye of Typhoon Noru skirted the coast of Shikoku on Sunday as it moved closer to a landfall on Honshu.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Typhoon Noru was located at latitude 33.6°N and longitude 134.5°W which put it about 85 miles (135 km) southwest of Osaka, Japan.  Noru was moving toward the northeast at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 970 mb.

The structure of Typhoon Noru improved on Sunday.  The circulation contracted around an eye with a diameter of approximately 20 miles (32 km).  They eye was surrounded by a ring of thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in the ring of storms.  Additional spiral bands were revolving around the core of Typhoon Noru.

An upper level trough northwest of Japan steered Typhoon Noru toward the northeast on Sunday.  The eye of Noru moved near the south coast of Shikoku.  The eye passed south of Kochi and very near Muroto, Toyo and Kainan.  Typhoon Noru brought gusty winds and heavy rain to the southern parts of Shikoku.

Typhoon Noru is expected to continue to move toward the northeast on Monday.  On its anticipated track the center of Typhoon Noru is expected to skirt the east coast of Shikoku and make landfall on Honshu near Wakayama.   After it makes landfall, Typhoon Noru is forecast to pass near Osaka and Kyoto.  Typhoon Noru will weaken as it moves across Honshu, but it will produce gusty winds and locally heavy rain.  The rain could cause floods in some locations.

Typhoon Noru Reaches Kyushu

The eye of Typhoon Noru reached the southern coast of Kyushu near Uchinoura on Saturday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of of Typhoon Noru was located at latitude 31.0°N and longitude 131.2°E which put it about 65 miles (105 km) south-southwest of Miyazaki, Japan.  Noru was moving toward the northeast at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 970 mb.

Typhoon Noru weakened as it made a slow clockwise loop on Saturday.  The winds of the typhoon may have mixed cooler water to the surface of the ocean.  Typhoon Noru also appears to be drawing cooler, drier air into the northern half of the circulation.  There is still an eye at the center of Noru, but the strong thunderstorms are all in the southern half of the circulation.  The strongest winds are occurring in the thunderstorms at the southern edge of the eye.  There are several bands of showers and thunderstorms outside the core of Typhoon Noru.

Typhoon Noru is moving over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  So, there is sufficient energy to support the circulation of a typhoon.  However, drier air in the northern half of the circulation is reducing the amount of energy that is reaching the core of the typhoon.  An upper level trough is approaching Typhoon Noru from the west and the vertical wind shear will increase when the trough gets closer to the typhoon.  Typhoon Noru could maintain its intensity for another 12 to 18 hours, but eventually the combination of drier air, more vertical shear and interaction with land will cause Noru to weaken.

Typhoon Noru was in an area where the steering currents were weak and it made a slow, tight clockwise loop on Saturday.  The upper level trough approaching from the west will start to steer Typhoon Noru toward the northeast.  Noru will move along the south coast of Kyushu.  On its anticipated path the center of Typhoon Noru could be near Kochi on the south coast of Shikoku in about 24 hours.  Noru could be near Osaka and Kyoto on Honshu in about 36 hours.

Typhoon Noru has the potential to bring strong winds, heavy rain and the potential for floods to southern Kyushu, Shikoku and parts of Honshu.

Typhoon Noru Bringing Wind and Rain to Northern Ryukyu Islands

Typhoon Noru was bringing gusty winds and heavy rain to the northern Ryukyu Islands on Friday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Typhoon Noru was located at latitude 29.3°N and longitude 130.3°E which put it about 90 miles (140 km) south of Kagoshima, Japan.  Noru was moving toward the northwest at 4 m.p.h. (6 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 90 m.p.h. (140 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 115 m.p.h. (185 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 959 mb.

The structure of Typhoon Noru has not changed much during the past 24 hours.  A large eye with a diameter of approximately 80 miles (130 km) occupies the center of the typhoon.  A broken eyewall surrounds the eye.  Strong thunderstorms surround the eastern side of the eye, while a broken ring of weaker showers and storms mark the western edge of the eye.  The strongest winds are occurring in the thunderstorms on the eastern edge of the eye.  Thunderstorms in the core of the circulation are generating upper level divergence which is pumping away mass in all directions.  A primary rainband extends from the eastern side of Typhoon Noru around the southern and western sides of the circulation.  Several other shorter bands are outside this primary rainband.  Typhoon Noru continues to exhibit a structure similar to an annular hurricane.

Although the core of Typhoon Noru is fairly large, the overall size of the storm is not as big as some typhoons.  Winds to typhoon force extend out about 40 miles in all directions from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extend out about 160 miles (260 km) from the center.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Noru is 13.9.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) is 17.0 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) is 30.9.

Typhoon Noru will be in an environment favorable for intensification for about another 24 hours.  Noru will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  An upper level ridge north of Noru is producing northerly winds which are blowing toward the top of the typhoon.  Those winds are fairly weak and there is not much vertical wind shear.  Typhoon Noru is likely to intensify during the next 24 hours and it could strengthen into the equivalent of a major hurricane again.  In a day or so, an upper level trough will approach from the west and wind shear will increase.  Typhoon Noru will weaken faster after it makes landfall in Kyushu.

Typhoon Noru is moving slowly around the western end of a subtropical ridge.  Noru is in an area where the steering currents are weak and the will remain weak for another 24 to 48 hours.  An upper level trough will approach Noru from the west in a day or so.  Southwesterly winds ahead of the trough will start to steer Typhoon Noru toward the northeast at a faster rate.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Noru could make landfall in Kyushu in less than 36 hours.

The large core and strength of Typhoon Noru make it capable of bringing strong winds and heavy rain to a large area.  Typhoon Noru will continue to bring wind and rain to the northern Ryukyu Islands for another 24 to 36 hours.  Noru could also cause wind damage, heavy rain and floods on Kyushu, Shikoku and western Honshu when it moves over those regions.

Tropical Storm Nanmadol Nearing Kyushu

Tropical Storm Nanmadol was quickly nearing Kyushu on Monday.  At 1:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Storm Nanmadol was located at latitude 31.0°N and longitude 127.4°E which put it about 215 miles (345 km) southwest of Sasebo, Japan.  Nanmadol was moving toward the north-northeast at 24 m.p.h. (39 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 70 m.p.h. (110 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 986 mb.

The structure of Tropical Storm Nanmadol was still consistent with its designation of a tropical cyclone, but there were signs that it could be about to start the transition to an extratropical cyclone.  There was a core of thunderstorms around the center of circulation.  The strongest winds were occurring in the inner core which extended out about 25 miles (40 km) from the center.  Several rainbands were on the eastern side of the circulation.  There were far fewer showers and thunderstorms in the western half of the circulation.  There were some indications that Nanmadol could be pulling cooler, drier, more stable air into the western side of the tropical storm.

Tropical Storm Nanmadol has probably reached its maximum intensity and it is likely to weaken during the next two days.  Nanmadol is currently over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 27°C.  However, it has reached the upper level westerly in the middle latitudes and the vertical wind shear is increasing.  Nanmadol will weaken faster when it moves across Japan.

The westerly winds in the middle latitudes have turned Tropical Storm Nanmadol toward the north-northeast.  As Nanmadol moves farther north, the speed of the westerlies will increase and the tropical storm is forecast to move quickly toward the east-northeast across southern Japan.  On its anticipated track, Tropical Storm Nanmadol will reach Kyushu in a few hours.  Nanmadol will also move over Shikoku and Honshu.  Tropical Storm Nanmadol will bring a brief period of gusty winds and the potential for locally heavy rain when it moves across southern Japan.

Typhoon Malakas Bringing Gusty Winds and Rain to Shikoku and Honshu

Typhoon Malakas is bringing wind and rain to coastal areas of Shikoku and Honshu.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Typhoon Malakas was located near latitude 33.4°N and longitude 134.7°W which put it about 90 miles (145 km) southwest of Osaka, Japan.  Malakas was moving toward the northeast at 25 m.p.h. (40 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 979 mb.

The structure of Typhoon Malakas is starting the transition from a tropical cyclone to an extratropical cyclone.  It retains an eye, but the thunderstorms in the southern part of the eyewall are thinning.  Most of the other thunderstorms are in rainbands north of the center of circulation.  Cooler, drier air is wrapping around the southern side of the circulation.  The strongest winds are occurring over the water near the center of circulation.  Heavy rain is falling over eastern Shikoku and southwestern Honshu near Osaka and Nagoya.

Although Typhoon Malakas is moving over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C, it will continue to weaken as it makes the transition to an extratropical cyclone.  An upper level trough west of Japan is producing southwesterly winds which are blowing across the top of the circulation.  Also, almost half of the circulation is moving over land and the center will move over coastal sections of Honshu.  Increasing vertical wind shear and the added friction caused by the land will weaken Malakas to a tropical storm on Tuesday.

The upper level trough is steering Typhoon Malakas quickly toward the northeast and that general motion is expected to continue.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Malakas will pass south of Osaka and Nagoya.  The center of then Tropical Storm Malakas will move near Tokyo in about 18 hours.  Malakas will continue to bring gusty winds to coastal parts of Honshu.

Powerful Typhoon Malakas Nearing Kyushu

Powerful Typhoon Malakas moved steadily closer to Kyushu on Sunday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Typhoon Malakas was centered at latitude 29.7°N and longitude 127.9°E which put it about 210 miles (340 km) southwest of Kagoshima, Japan.  Malakas was moving toward the east-northeast at 13 m.p.h. (21 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 120 m.p.h. (195 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 150 m.p.h. (240 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 948 mb.

The circulation of Typhoon Malakas remains well organized and it is taking on the typical structure of a strong tropical cyclone that is starting to recurve.  The size of the eye increased during the past 24 hours.  The eye is surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms which is thinner south of the eye.  There are several strong rainbands, but they are primarily in the northern half of the circulation.  The circulation is beginning to pull drier air around the southern side of Malakas which is why the rainbands in that part of the typhoon are weaker.  Thunderstorms in the core of Typhoon Malakas are generating upper level divergence that is pumping out mass toward the northeast.

Typhoon Malakas is moving through an environment that should allow it to maintain its intensity during the next few hours.  It is moving over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  An upper level trough to the west of Japan is generating southwesterly winds which are blowing across the top of the circulation.  However, the vertical wind shear is moderate enough to allow Typhoon Malakas to maintain its intensity in the short term.  When Malakas moves farther to the northeast, it will move into a region where where upper level winds are stronger and the vertical wind shear will increase.  More vertical wind shear and the interaction of the circulation with Kyushu, Shikoku and Honshu will cause Malakas to weaken.

The upper level trough will continue to steer Typhoon Malakas toward the northeast.  On its anticipated track the center of Malakas will be near southwest Kyushu in about 12 hours.  It will be near Shikoku in 20 hours and is could be near Honshu in 30 hours.

Typhoon Malakas will bring strong winds and heavy rain to southwestern Kyushu.  It is likely to still be a typhoon when it passes near the coast of Shikoku.  Malakas could be a tropical storm when it passes south of Kyoto and when it moves near Tokyo in a couple of days.  Malakas could bring wind and heavy rain to the coastal portions of Honshu later this week.