Tag Archives: Tropical Storm Fernanda

Tropical Storms Fernanda and Greg Continue West Across the Pacific

Tropical Storms Fernanda and Greg continued to move west across the Pacific Ocean on Thursday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Fernanda was located at latitude 18.4°N and longitude 141.4°W which put it about 900 miles (1445 km) east of Hilo, Hawaii.  Fernanda was moving toward the west at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1000 mb.

At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Greg was located at latitude 14.3°N and longitude 117.4°W which put it about 770 miles (1240 km) southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.  Greg was moving toward the west at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h).  The maximum wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1003 mb.

Tropical Storm Fernanda is moving through an environment that is unfavorable for intensification.  Fernanda is moving over water where the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) is near 26°C.  An upper level trough northeast of Hawaii is producing southwesterly winds which are causing strong vertical wind shear over Fernanda.  Tropical Storm Fernanda has a strong low level circulation but the vertical wind shear will blow the tops off any new thunderstorms that form.  The shear is likely to cause Fernanda to continue to weaken and the low level circulation is likely to gradually spin down.

Tropical Storm Greg did not intensify much on Thursday but recent satellite images seem to indicate that Greg may be getting more organized.  A primary band of showers and thunderstorms has wrapped about two thirds of the way around the eastern and northern sides of the center of circulation.  Upper level outflow from Tropical Storm Fernanda, which is farther west and an upper level low northwest of Greg were generating strong southerly winds which were blowing toward the top of the tropical storm.  Those winds were causing strong vertical wind shear over Tropical Storm Greg.  The upper low appears to be moving farther away from Greg.  Tropical Storm Greg is moving over water where the SST is near 28°C.  If the vertical shear diminishes and the circulation organizes, then there is sufficient energy in the upper ocean to allow Greg to intensify into a hurricane.

A subtropical ridge north of Greg is steering the tropical storm toward the west.  A general westerly motion is expected to continue during the next several days.  Tropical Storm Greg could take a path similar to the track of Tropical Storm Fernanda.

TD 6E Strengthens Into Tropical Storm Fernanda

Tropical Depression Six-E strengthened into Tropical Storm Fernanda on Wednesday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Fernanda was located at latitude 11.9°N and longitude 113.1°W which put it about 790 miles (1270 km) south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.  Fernanda was moving toward the west at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1004 mb.

Thunderstorms on the western side of the center of Tropical Storm Fernanda increased on Wednesday night.  Several bands of showers of thunderstorms formed in the western half of the circulation, but the distribution of convection remained asymmetrical.  There were few showers and thunderstorms in the eastern half of the circulation.  The thunderstorms in the western half of the were generating upper level divergence which was pumping out mass to the west of Tropical Storm Fernanda.

Tropical Storm Fernanda is currently in an environment that is moderately favorable for intensification.  It is moving over water where the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) is near 29.5°C.  An upper level ridge north of Fernanda is producing easterly winds which are blowing toward the top of the tropical storm.  Those winds are causing moderate vertical wind shear and the shear may be the cause of the asymmetrical distribution of thunderstorms.  Fernanda is likely to move into an area where the upper level winds are weaker and the shear will decrease.  Warm SSTs and less wind shear should allow Tropical Storm Fernanda to intensify into a hurricane later this week.  Once an eye forms, a period of rapid intensification will be possible and Fernanda could eventually become a major hurricane.

A subtropical ridge north of Fernanda is steering the tropical storm westward and a general westerly motion is expected to continue for the next few days.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Fernanda will move away from Mexico and it could move into the Central Pacific in a few days.