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Typhoon Noru Skirts Coast of Shikoku on Way to Honshu

The eye of Typhoon Noru skirted the coast of Shikoku on Sunday as it moved closer to a landfall on Honshu.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Typhoon Noru was located at latitude 33.6°N and longitude 134.5°W which put it about 85 miles (135 km) southwest of Osaka, Japan.  Noru was moving toward the northeast at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 970 mb.

The structure of Typhoon Noru improved on Sunday.  The circulation contracted around an eye with a diameter of approximately 20 miles (32 km).  They eye was surrounded by a ring of thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in the ring of storms.  Additional spiral bands were revolving around the core of Typhoon Noru.

An upper level trough northwest of Japan steered Typhoon Noru toward the northeast on Sunday.  The eye of Noru moved near the south coast of Shikoku.  The eye passed south of Kochi and very near Muroto, Toyo and Kainan.  Typhoon Noru brought gusty winds and heavy rain to the southern parts of Shikoku.

Typhoon Noru is expected to continue to move toward the northeast on Monday.  On its anticipated track the center of Typhoon Noru is expected to skirt the east coast of Shikoku and make landfall on Honshu near Wakayama.   After it makes landfall, Typhoon Noru is forecast to pass near Osaka and Kyoto.  Typhoon Noru will weaken as it moves across Honshu, but it will produce gusty winds and locally heavy rain.  The rain could cause floods in some locations.

Typhoon Noru Reaches Kyushu

The eye of Typhoon Noru reached the southern coast of Kyushu near Uchinoura on Saturday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of of Typhoon Noru was located at latitude 31.0°N and longitude 131.2°E which put it about 65 miles (105 km) south-southwest of Miyazaki, Japan.  Noru was moving toward the northeast at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 970 mb.

Typhoon Noru weakened as it made a slow clockwise loop on Saturday.  The winds of the typhoon may have mixed cooler water to the surface of the ocean.  Typhoon Noru also appears to be drawing cooler, drier air into the northern half of the circulation.  There is still an eye at the center of Noru, but the strong thunderstorms are all in the southern half of the circulation.  The strongest winds are occurring in the thunderstorms at the southern edge of the eye.  There are several bands of showers and thunderstorms outside the core of Typhoon Noru.

Typhoon Noru is moving over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  So, there is sufficient energy to support the circulation of a typhoon.  However, drier air in the northern half of the circulation is reducing the amount of energy that is reaching the core of the typhoon.  An upper level trough is approaching Typhoon Noru from the west and the vertical wind shear will increase when the trough gets closer to the typhoon.  Typhoon Noru could maintain its intensity for another 12 to 18 hours, but eventually the combination of drier air, more vertical shear and interaction with land will cause Noru to weaken.

Typhoon Noru was in an area where the steering currents were weak and it made a slow, tight clockwise loop on Saturday.  The upper level trough approaching from the west will start to steer Typhoon Noru toward the northeast.  Noru will move along the south coast of Kyushu.  On its anticipated path the center of Typhoon Noru could be near Kochi on the south coast of Shikoku in about 24 hours.  Noru could be near Osaka and Kyoto on Honshu in about 36 hours.

Typhoon Noru has the potential to bring strong winds, heavy rain and the potential for floods to southern Kyushu, Shikoku and parts of Honshu.

Typhoon Noru Bringing Wind and Rain to Northern Ryukyu Islands

Typhoon Noru was bringing gusty winds and heavy rain to the northern Ryukyu Islands on Friday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Typhoon Noru was located at latitude 29.3°N and longitude 130.3°E which put it about 90 miles (140 km) south of Kagoshima, Japan.  Noru was moving toward the northwest at 4 m.p.h. (6 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 90 m.p.h. (140 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 115 m.p.h. (185 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 959 mb.

The structure of Typhoon Noru has not changed much during the past 24 hours.  A large eye with a diameter of approximately 80 miles (130 km) occupies the center of the typhoon.  A broken eyewall surrounds the eye.  Strong thunderstorms surround the eastern side of the eye, while a broken ring of weaker showers and storms mark the western edge of the eye.  The strongest winds are occurring in the thunderstorms on the eastern edge of the eye.  Thunderstorms in the core of the circulation are generating upper level divergence which is pumping away mass in all directions.  A primary rainband extends from the eastern side of Typhoon Noru around the southern and western sides of the circulation.  Several other shorter bands are outside this primary rainband.  Typhoon Noru continues to exhibit a structure similar to an annular hurricane.

Although the core of Typhoon Noru is fairly large, the overall size of the storm is not as big as some typhoons.  Winds to typhoon force extend out about 40 miles in all directions from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extend out about 160 miles (260 km) from the center.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Noru is 13.9.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) is 17.0 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) is 30.9.

Typhoon Noru will be in an environment favorable for intensification for about another 24 hours.  Noru will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  An upper level ridge north of Noru is producing northerly winds which are blowing toward the top of the typhoon.  Those winds are fairly weak and there is not much vertical wind shear.  Typhoon Noru is likely to intensify during the next 24 hours and it could strengthen into the equivalent of a major hurricane again.  In a day or so, an upper level trough will approach from the west and wind shear will increase.  Typhoon Noru will weaken faster after it makes landfall in Kyushu.

Typhoon Noru is moving slowly around the western end of a subtropical ridge.  Noru is in an area where the steering currents are weak and the will remain weak for another 24 to 48 hours.  An upper level trough will approach Noru from the west in a day or so.  Southwesterly winds ahead of the trough will start to steer Typhoon Noru toward the northeast at a faster rate.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Noru could make landfall in Kyushu in less than 36 hours.

The large core and strength of Typhoon Noru make it capable of bringing strong winds and heavy rain to a large area.  Typhoon Noru will continue to bring wind and rain to the northern Ryukyu Islands for another 24 to 36 hours.  Noru could also cause wind damage, heavy rain and floods on Kyushu, Shikoku and western Honshu when it moves over those regions.

Typhoon Noru Threatens Southwestern Japan

Typhoon Noru posed an increased threat to southwestern Japan as it slowly moved closer on Thursday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Typhoon Noru was located at latitude 28.6°N and longitude 131.3°E which put it about 145 miles (235 km) south-southeast of Kagoshima, Japan.  Noru was moving toward the west at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were gusts to 105 m.p.h. (170 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 962 mb.

Although Noru is still a powerful and dangerous typhoon, it is not quite as well organized as it was several days ago.  A very large eye with a diameter of 95 miles (150 km) is at the center of circulation.  A broken ring of thunderstorms surrounds the eye.  There are breaks on both the eastern and western sides of the eyewall.  A broad rainband wraps around the southern and eastern sides of the circulation.  Thunderstorms in the core of Noru are generating strong upper level divergence which is pumping mass away from the typhoon.  There are few showers and thunderstorms in the northwestern quadrant and there may be drier air in that part of Typhoon Noru.

Winds to typhoon force extend out about 40 miles (65 km/h) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extend out about 185 miles (295 km/h) from the center.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Noru is 12.7.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) is 16.4 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) is 29.1

Typhoon Noru will move through an environment that may be somewhat favorable for intensification.  Noru will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  An upper level ridge northwest of Noru is producing northeasterly winds which are blowing toward the top of the typhoon.  Those winds are creating moderate vertical wind shear.  The typhoon could also pull in drier air on the northwestern side of the circulation.  Even though the environmental factors are mixed, some intensification may be possible during the next 24 to 48 hours.

Typhoon Noru is approaching the western end of a subtropical ridge which has been steering the typhoon toward the west.  Noru is forecast to slow as the steering currents weaken.  Typhoon Noru is forecast to turn slowly northward during the next 24 hours.  In about 48 hours westerly winds in the middle latitudes will begin to carry the typhoon more quickly toward the northeast.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Noru could approach the northern Ryukyu Islands on Friday.  It could bring strong winds to Amami-O-Shima.  The center could pass near Yaku-Shima and Tanega-Shima during the weekend.  In a little over two days Typhoon Noru could reach southwestern Kyushu.  Typhoon Noru has the potential to bring strong winds and heavy rain to parts of southwestern Japan during the next few days.  The heavy rain could also cause flash floods.

Typhoon Noru Turns Toward Southwestern Japan

Typhoon Noru turned toward southwestern Japan on Tuesday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Typhoon Noru was located at latitude 25.6°N and longitude 136.2°E which put it about 525 miles (850 km) south-southeast of Miyazaki, Japan.  Noru was moving toward the northwest at 6 m.p.h. (10 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 120 m.p.h. (195 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 150 m.p.h. (240 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 942 mb.

Typhoon Noru has a very symmetrical circulation that looks similar to what are sometimes called annular hurricanes.  There is a large circular eye at the center of Typhoon Noru.  The eye has a diameter of 35 miles (55 km).  The eye is surrounded by a wide ring of strong thunderstorms.  There are few bands of showers and thunderstorms outside the core of the typhoon.  The thunderstorms in the core of Noru are generating strong upper level divergence which is pumping mass away from the typhoon.

Typhoon Noru will be moving through a favorable environment during the next several days.  Noru will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  The upper level winds are weak and there is little vertical wind shear.  Typhoons and hurricanes that have an annular structure like that of Typhoon Noru tend to maintain a fairly steady intensity.  Given the favorable environment, Noru could strengthen during the next few days.

A subtropical ridge is steering Typhoon Noru slowly toward the northwest.  The ridge is forecast to strengthen and to steer Noru more toward the west-northwest during the next several days.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Noru could approach southwestern Japan in about three days.

Noru Rapidly Intensifies Into a Super Typhoon

Typhoon Noru rapidly intensified into a Super Typhoon on Sunday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Typhoon Noru was located at latitude 22.9°N and longitude 140.3°E which put it about 150 miles (240 km) south-southwest of Iwo To.  Noru was moving toward the west at 5 m.p.h.  The maximum sustained wind speed was 150 m.p.h. (240 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 185 m.p.h. (295 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 922 mb.

The circulation of Typhoon Noru is very well organized.  There is a circular eye with a diameter of 20 miles (32 km) in the center of Noru.  The eye is surrounded by a wide ring of strong thunderstorms.  The strongest winds are occurring in this ring.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms are revolving around the core of Typhoon Noru.  Winds to typhoon force extend out about 45 miles (75 km) in all directions.  Winds to tropical storm force extend out about 150 miles (240 km) from the center.

The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Noru is 31.6.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) is 18.5 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) is 50.1.

Typhoon Noru is in a very favorable environment.  Noru is moving over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30.5°C.  The upper level winds are weak and there is little vertical wind shear.  Typhoon Noru could maintain its intensity or weaken slowly over the next few days.

Typhoon Noru is moving around the western end of a subtropical ridge which is steering the typhoon slowly toward the west.  Noru is expected to start moving toward the north when it reaches the western end of the ridge.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Noru will remain south of Japan for much of the week.

Typhoon Nesat Causes Heavy Rain, Floods in Taiwan

Typhoon Nesat caused heavy rain and floods in parts of Taiwan when it moved over the island.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Nesat was located at latitude 26.2°N and longitude 118.9°E which put it near Fuzhou, China.  Nesat was moving toward the northwest at 13 m.p.h. (21 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 977 mb.

The core of Typhoon Nesat moved over northern Taiwan earlier today and the center passed close to Taipei.  The typhoon brought strong winds and heavy rain to parts of northern and eastern Taiwan.  The rainfall was heavy enough in some locations to cause flash flooding.  Nesat weakened to a tropical storm when the center passed over Taiwan.

Tropical Storm Nesat moved quickly across the Taiwan Strait and it made another landfall on the east coast of China near Fuzhou.  Nesat produced gusty winds and locally heavy rain near the coast.  Heavy rain will continue to fall over eastern China as Tropical Storm Nesat moves farther inland and the rain could result in flooding in some locations.

Parts of Taiwan could receive additional heavy rain on Sunday when Tropical Storm Haitang approaches the southern part of the island.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Haitang was located at latitude 20.8°N and longitude 119.7°E which put it about 370 miles (595 km) south-southwest of Taipei, Taiwan.  Haitang was moving toward the east-northeast at at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 997 mb.

The distribution of rain in Tropical Storm Haitang is very asymmetrical.  Almost all of the showers and thunderstorms are located south of the center of circulation.  However, there is a fairly large area of heavy rain in the southern half of the circulation of Haitang.  Tropical Storm Haitang is currently moving toward the east-northeast, but it is forecast to turn toward the north in a trough of low pressure left behind in the wake of Tropical Storm Nesat.  On its anticipated track Haitang, could make landfall in southwestern Taiwan near Kaohsiung in about 12 hours.  When the heavy rain in Haitang reaches Taiwan, it could exacerbate the flooding caused by Nesat.

Elsewhere over the Western North Pacific the center of Tropical Storm Noru passed just east of Iwo To.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Noru was located at latitude 23.5°N and longitude 141.4°E which put it about 80 miles (130 km) south-southeast of Iwo To.  Noru was moving toward the south-southwest at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 70 m.p.h. (110 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 978 mb.

Tropical Storm Noru brought periods of heavy rain and gusty winds to Iwo To when the core of tropical storm moved east of the island.  Tropical Storm Noru is forecast to turn toward the west on Sunday.  The outer bands on the northern side of Noru will continue to cause gusty winds and periods of heavier rain on Iwo To as the tropical storm passes south of the island.

Typhoon Noru Approaches Iwo To From Northeast

Typhoon Noru approached Iwo To from the northeast on Friday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Typhoon Noru was located at latitude 27.6°N and longitude 143.0°E which put it about 220 miles (355 km) north-northeast of Iwo To.  Noru was moving toward the southwest at 11 m.p.h. (17 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (150 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 975 mb.

Typhoon Noru retains a well organized circulation.  An eyewall wraps about three quarters of the way around the eye.  There is a break in the ring of thunderstorms on the northeastern rim of the eye.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms are occurring north and east of the center of circulation.  There are fewer showers and thunderstorms south and west of the center of the typhoon.  Thunderstorms near the center are generating some upper level divergence.  The circulation of Typhoon Noru is fairly large.  Winds to tropical storm force extend out about 200 miles (320 km) from the center of circulation.

Typhoon Noru will be moving through an environment that is marginally favorable for intensification.  Noru will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) is near 29°C.  An upper level ridge centered west of Japan is producing northeasterly winds which are blowing toward the top of the circulation.  Those northeasterly winds are creating moderate vertical wind shear, which is limiting the upper level divergence to the north of the typhoon.  The wind shear is not strong enough to weaken Typhoon Noru, but it is strong enough to inhibit intensification.  Typhoon Noru may undergo small changes in intensity during the next several days, but it could maintain its status as a typhoon.

The ridge west of Japan is also steering typhoon Noru toward the southwest and that general motion is expected to continue for another day or so.  In 24 to 48 hours Noru is forecast to reach and area where the steering winds are weak and it could stall near Iwo To.  On its anticipated path Typhoon Noru could bring an extended period of strong gusty winds and heavy rain to Iwo To.

Tropical Storm Nesat Forms Southeast of Taiwan

Tropical Storm Newsat formed southeast of Taiwan on Wednesday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Nesat was located at latitude 18.0°N and longitude 127.5°E which put it about 620 miles (1000 km) southeast of Taipei, Taiwan.  Nesat was moving toward the north at 6 m.p.h. (10 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 988 mb.

A well organized surface circulation formed in an area of thunderstorms southeast of Taiwan on Wednesday.  A strong cluster of thunderstorms formed south of the center of circulation.  Additional bands of showers and thunderstorms developed in the western and southern portions of Tropical Storm Nesat.  There were few thunderstorms in the eastern half of the circulation.  More thunderstorms appeared to be forming near the core of the circulation in recent hours.  The thunderstorms in the core were generating upper level divergence which was pumping out mass.

Tropical Storm Nesat will be moving through an area that is favorable for intensification.  Nesat will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 31°C.  Tropical Storm Nesat is beneath the northeastern part of an upper level ridge.  The ridge is producing northeasterly winds which are blowing toward the top of the circulation.  Those winds are causing some vertical wind shear and the shear could be the reason for the asymmetrical distribution of thunderstorms.  Tropical Storm Nesat could move under the axis of the upper level ridge where the winds are weaker.  In that case the shear would be less and Nesat could intensify more quickly.  Tropical Storm Nesat is likely to intensify into a typhoon during the next 24 hours.

Tropical Storm Nesat is moving around a weak area in a subtropical ridge, which is allowing the tropical storm to move toward the north.  The ridge is forecast to strengthen and when that happens it will steer Nesat more toward the west.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Nesat could approach Taiwan in about three days.  Nesat could be a strong typhoon when it nears Taiwan.

Elsewhere in the Western North Pacific Typhoon Noru has turned back toward the west.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Typhoon Noru was located at latitude 30.6°N and longitude 151.2°E which put it about 770 miles (1240 km) east-northeast of Iwo To.  Noru was moving toward the west at 19 m.p.h. (31 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (150 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 978 mb.

A subtropical ridge north of Typhoon Noru is steering the typhoon toward the west.  A general westerly motion is forecast to continue for several more days.  Noru could reach an area of weaker steering winds in a few days and its motion may slow.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Noru could approach Iwo To in three or four days.

Tropical Storm Sonca Near Landfall in Vietnam.

Tropical Storm Sonca neared a landfall on the coast of Vietnam on Monday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Storm Sonca was located at latitude 16.7°N and longitude 108.2°E which put it about 60 miles (95 km) east-northeast of Hue, Vietnam.  Sonca was moving toward the west at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 991 mb.

The circulation of Tropical Storm Sonca is fairly small.  Winds to tropical storm force only extend out about 60 miles (95 km) from the center of circulation.  A subtropical ridge north of Sonca is steering the tropical storm toward the west and that general motion is expected to continue for another 24 to 36 hours.  On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Storm Sonca will make landfall north of Hue, Vietnam in a few hours.

Tropical Storm Sonca will bring gusty winds, locally heavy rain and the potential for floods when it makes landfall.  Sonca will continue to move inland over central Vietnam, central Laos and northeastern Thailand.  Sonca could continue to produce locally heavy rain over those areas as it moves inland and weakens.

Elsewhere in the Western North Pacific the circulations of Typhoon Noru and Tropical Storm Kulap are interacting east-southeast of Japan.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Typhoon Noru was located at latitude 25.9°N and longitude 157.0°E which put it about 1330 miles (2150 km) east-southeast of Tokyo, Japan.  Noru was moving toward the east at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 95 m.p.h. (155 km/h) and there were gusts to 115 m.p.h. (185 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 966 mb.

At 11:00 p.m. EDT the center of Tropical Storm Kulap was located at latitude 32.9°N and longitude 155.8°E which put it about 1095 miles (1765 km) east-southeast of Tokyo, Japan.  Kulap was moving toward the west at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1000 mb.

Typhoon Noru and Tropical Storm Kulap are close enough to each other to rotate cyclonically around a point between them in what is called the Fujiwhara effect.  Typhoon Noru is the much larger and stronger circulation and upper level outflow from Noru is causing vertical wind shear over Tropical Storm Kulap.  If the two tropical cyclones move closer to each other, it is possible that the circulation of Kulap could be absorbed by the larger, more powerful circulation of Typhoon Noru.