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Tropical Depression Cristobal Brings Rain to Lower Mississippi River Valley

Tropical Depression Cristobal brought rain to the lower Mississippi River Valley on Monday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Depression Cristobal was located at latitude 34.8°N and longitude 92.8°W which put it about 10 miles (15 km) west of Little Rock, Arkansas.  Cristobal was moving toward the north-northwest at 17 m.p.h. (28 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 30 m.p.h. (50 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 994 mb.

Tropical Depression Cristobal moved northward across Louisiana and Arkansas on Monday.  Steadier rain fell in the northern part of the circulation around Cristobal.  Diverging air from a surface high pressure system east of the Great Lakes converged with the circulation around the northern side of Tropical Depression Cristobal to produce rising motion.  The rising motion produced the steadier rain.  Thunderstorms in bands in the southern and eastern parts of Cristobal dropped locally heavy rain over parts of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama.  Jackson, Mississippi received 2.49 inches (6.3 cm) of rain.  Little Rock, Arkansas received 1.49 inches (3.8 cm) of rain.

Tropical Depression Cristobal will move around the western side of a high pressure system.  The high will steer Cristobal toward the north during the next several days.  The circulation around Tropical Depression Cristobal retained tropical characteristics on Monday night.  Radiosonde data from Little Rock and Jackson, Mississippi showed that there was still a warm core in the middle troposphere.  Cristobal is forecast to make a gradual transition to an extratropical cyclone during the next 24 to 36 hours.  The circulation could strengthen during the extratropical transition and a Gale Warning has been issued for Lake Michigan.  Flood Watches were also in effect for locations from Mississippi to Wisconsin.

Tropical Storm Cristobal Causes Storm Surge on Gulf Coast

Tropical Storm Cristobal caused a storm surge on the Gulf Coast on Sunday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Tropical Storm Cristobal was located at latitude 30.3°N and longitude 90.2°W which put it about 20 miles (30 km) north-northwest of New Orleans, Louisiana.  Cristobal was moving toward the north-northwest at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 993 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning remained in effect for the portion of the coast from Morgan City, Louisiana to the Okaloosa/Walton County Line in Florida.

The large circulation around Tropical Storm Cristobal blew water toward the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico on Sunday.  The wind produced a rise in the water level from northwest Florida to southeast Louisiana.  The highest storm surges occurred along the coast of Mississippi and southeast Louisiana.  The water level reached 7.47 feet (2.28 m) at the Waveland Yacht Club in Mississippi.  The storm surge was 7.62 feet (2.32 m) at Shell Beach in Louisiana.  The storm surge covered coastal roads in Grand Isle, Louisiana and Biloxi, Mississippi.

The broad center of Tropical Storm Cristobal passed across the Lower Mississippi River delta on Sunday afternoon before it moved over New Orleans.  Cristobal began to weaken slowly as it moved inland.  Winds to tropical storm force were still occurring in the southeastern part of the circulation which was still over the Gulf of Mexico.  Most of the rain was falling in bands on the northern side of Tropical Storm Cristobal.  Locally heavy rain fell over Northwest Florida, Southwest Alabama, Southern Mississippi and Southeastern Louisiana.

Tropical Storm Cristobal will move around the western end of a subtropical high pressure system over the western Atlantic Ocean.  The high will steer Cristobal toward the north during the next several days.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Cristobal will move over Louisiana and Arkansas on Monday.  Cristobal will continue to weaken slowly as it moves farther inland.  Tropical Storm Cristobal will drop locally heavy rain over parts of Mississippi, eastern Louisiana, Arkansas and Missouri.  Flood Watches have been issued for some of those areas.

Tropical Depression Bill Bringing Storms to Lower Ohio Valley

The circulation around Tropical Depression Bill brought strong storms to the Lower Ohio River Valley on Friday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Depression Bill was located at latitude 37.1°N and longitude 90.1°W which put it about 30 miles (50 km) west of Cape Girardeau, Missouri.  Bill was moving toward the east-northeast at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 25 m.p.h., but there were higher gusts in thunderstorms.  The minimum surface pressure was 1004 mb.

The circulation around Tropical Depression Bill retained enough tropical characteristics on Friday to be considered a tropical cyclone.  There was still evidence of a warm core in the middle troposphere with a strong center of circulation at the surface and divergent outflow in the upper levels.  Spiral bands of showers and thunderstorms continued to rotate cyclonically around the center, and some thunderstorms approached severe criteria.  A stationary frontal boundary ran from New Jersey across Ohio to central Missouri.  However, the circulation around the tropical depression was south of the boundary and it was clearly a distinct area of low pressure.

Tropical Depression Bill is expected to continue its east-northeasterly motion during the weekend.  It will pass south of Ohio on Saturday and cross New Jersey on Sunday.  The tropical depression will continue to produce locally heavy rainfall and the potential for isolated severe thunderstorms.

Tropical Depression Bill Bringing Rain to Arkansas and Missouri

Tropical Depression Bill continued its slow movement over the South Central U.S. on Thursday and it brought rain to Arkansas and southern Missouri.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Depression Bill was located at latitude 35.9°N and longitude 93.8°W which put it about 20 miles (30 km) east of Fayetteville, Arkansas.  Bill was moving toward the east-northeast at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 20 m.p.h. (30 km/h) and the minimum surface pressure was 1005 mb.

Even thought the center of Bill has been over land for more than 48 hours, it retains many of the characteristics of a tropical cyclone.  It has a well defined cyclonic circulation with a warm core in the middle troposphere and there is upper level divergence.  As a result, Bill is still officially classified as a tropical depression.

Bill is moving around the western end of a high pressure system centered over the Atlantic Ocean.  It should continue to move toward the east-northeast during the next several days.  On its anticipated track Bill will bring rain to northern Arkansas and southern Missouri on Friday.  It will move up the Ohio River Valley on Saturday and enhance the rainfall in those areas.  The circulation of the tropical depression could merge with a nearly stationary frontal boundary north of the Ohio River during the weekend.  Heavy rain falling on saturated ground could create the potential for flooding in some areas.

Tropical Depression Bill Crossing Red River Into Oklahoma

Tropical Depression Bill moved northward across north Texas on Wednesday and brought heavy rain to parts of Texas and Oklahoma.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Depression Bill was located at latitude 33.7°N and longitude 97.3°W which put it about 65 miles (105 km) north-northwest of Dallas, Texas.  Bill was moving toward the north at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 30 m.p.h. (50 km/h).  There were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) in some thunderstorms.  The minimum surface pressure was 999 mb.

Bill still has a well organized circulation at the surface and throughout the troposphere.  There is still a warm core in the middle troposphere and divergence in the upper levels.  The upper level divergence pumped out the same amount of mass as converged in the lower levels and the surface pressure remained constant on Wednesday.  Some drier air is wrapping around the southern part of the circulation and most of the rain is falling north and east of the center.  The slow movement of Bill has generated significant amounts of rain and flooding is occurring in some parts of Texas and Oklahoma.  A few thunderstorms have also produced damaging wind gusts.

Bill is expected to turn toward the northeast as is moves around the western end of a high pressure system centered off the southeast coast of the U.S.  It will move slowly across Oklahoma on Thursday and across Arkansas on Friday before moving up the Ohio River Valley during the weekend.