Category Archives: Australian Region

Rare Late Season Tropical Cyclone Forms over South Indian Ocean

A rare late season tropical cyclone formed over the South Indian Ocean on Thursday. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Cyclone 01S was located at latitude 10.7°S and longitude 95.0°E which put it about 170 miles (275 km) west-northwest of Cocos Island. Tropical Cyclone 01S was moving toward the southeast at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb.

The circulation around a low pressure system over the South Indian Ocean west-northwest of Cocos Island strengthened on Thursday and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology both designated the system as a tropical cyclone. It is unusual for a tropical cyclone to form this late in the season in the southern hemisphere. It is the equivalent of a tropical cyclone forming in late January in the northern hemisphere.

The distribution of thunderstorms around Tropical Cyclone 01S was asymmetrical. The strongest thunderstorms were occurring in bands in the southern half of the tropical cyclone. Bands in the northern half of Tropical Cyclone 01S consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. Tropical Cyclone 01S was under the southwestern part of an upper level ridge centered northwest of Australia. The upper level ridge was producing northerly winds that were blowing toward the top of the tropical cyclone’s circulation. Those winds were causing moderate vertical wind shear. The wind shear was causing the asymmetrical distribution of thunderstorms. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 170 miles (275 km) in the southeastern quadrant of Tropical Cyclone 01S. Winds in the other parts of the tropical cyclone were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Tropical Cyclone 01S will move through an environment somewhat favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. The tropical cyclone will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28˚C. However, the upper level ridge northwest of Australia will continue to cause moderate vertical wind shear. Tropical Cyclone 01S could strengthen a little more during the next 24 hours, but the moderate vertical wind shear will limit intensification.

Tropical Cyclone 01S will move north of a high pressure system over the South Indian Ocean during the next several days. The high pressure system will steer the tropical cyclone toward the west. On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone 01S will begin to move farther away from Cocos Island.

Tropical Cyclone Halima Forms South of Diego Garcia

Tropical Cyclone Halima formed south of Diego Garcia on Wednesday. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Cyclone Halima was located at latitude 13.4°S and longitude 75.7°E which put it about 485 miles (780 km) south-southeast of Diego Garcia. Halima was moving toward the west-southwest at 9 m.p.h (15 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 997 mb.

The circulation around a low pressure system over the South Indian Ocean south of Diego Garcia strengthened on Wednesday and the system was designated at Tropical Cyclone Halima. More thunderstorms formed west of the center of Halima’s circulation. The strongest thunderstorms were occurring in bands in the western half of Tropical Cyclone Halima. Bands in the eastern half of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. Storms near the center of circulation generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the tropical cyclone. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 90 miles (145 km) from the center of Halima.

Tropical Cyclone Halima will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. Halima will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28˚C. It will move under the northern part of an upper level ridge over the South Indian Ocean. The ridge will produce easterly winds that will blow toward the top of Halima’s circulation. Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear, but the shear will not be enough to prevent intensification. Tropical Cyclone Halima will intensify during the next 36 hours and it could strengthen to the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon.

Tropical Cyclone Halima will move around the western end of a high pressure system over the South Indian Ocean during the next 36 hours. The high pressure system will steer Halima toward the south. On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone Halima will move farther away from Diego Garcia.

Elsewhere over the South Indian Ocean, Tropical Cyclone Charlotte weakened gradually northwest of Australia. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Cyclone Charlotte was located at latitude 20.4°S and longitude 107.6°E which put it about 430 miles (695 km) west-northwest of Learmonth, Australia. Charlotte was moving toward the south-southwest at 13 m.p.h (20 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 979 mb.

Tropical Cyclone Charlotte Spins Northwest of Australia

Tropical Cyclone Charotte was spinning over the South Indian Ocean northwest of Australia on Tuesday night. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Cyclone Charlotte was located at latitude 18.5°S and longitude 108.7°E which put it about 435 miles (700 km) northwest of Learmonth, Australia. Charlotte was moving toward the south-southwest at 6 m.p.h (10 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 105 m.p.h. (165 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 973 mb.

Tropical Cyclone Charlotte continued to spin over over the South Indian Ocean northwest of Australia on Tuesday night. The environment around Charlotte became less favorable for a tropical cyclone on Tuesday evening and the tropical cyclone was beginning to be affected the different environment. The ring of thunderstorms around the eye weakened and the overall distribution of thunderstorms became asymmetrical. The strongest thunderstorms were occurring in bands in the southern half of the circulation around Tropical Cyclone Charlotte. Bands in the northern half of the tropical cyclone consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. Storms near the center of circulation were still generating upper level divergence that pumped mass away to the southeast of the tropical cyclone. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 125 miles (200 km) from the center of Tropical Cyclone Charlotte.

Tropical Cyclone Charlotte will continue to be in an environment unfavorable for a tropical cyclone during the next several days. Charlotte will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28˚C. An upper level trough over the South Indian Ocean will approach Charlotte from the west. The trough will produce northwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of Charlotte’s circulation. Those winds will cause moderate vertical wind shear. The flow of air around Tropical Cyclone Charlotte could also pull drier air into the western and northern parts of the circulation. The wind shear and the drier air will cause Tropical Cyclone Charlotte to weaken during the next several days.

Tropical Cyclone Charlotte will move around the western part of a high pressure system over Australia during the next 36 hours. The high pressure system will steer Charlotte toward the south. On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone Charlotte will move parallel to the coast of Western Australia. Charlotte will remain west of the coast during the next 36 hours.

Tropical Cyclone Charlotte Strengthens to Equivalent of Hurricane/Typhoon

Tropical Cyclone Charlotte strengthened to the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon over the South Indian Ocean northwest of Australia on Monday afternoon. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Cyclone Charlotte was located at latitude 16.4°S and longitude 109.6°E which put it about 500 miles (805 km) northwest of Learmonth, Australia. Charlotte was moving toward the southwest at 9 m.p.h (15 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 105 m.p.h. (165 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 973 mb.

Tropical Cyclone Charlotte continued to intensify on Monday. A small circular eye formed at the center of Charlotte’s circulation. The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the small core of Tropical Cyclone Charlotte. Storms near the core generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the tropical cyclone. Winds to hurricane/typhoon force extended out 15 miles (25 km) from the center of circulation. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 140 miles (225 km) from the center.

Tropical Cyclone Charlotte will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Charlotte will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear. Tropical Cyclone Charlotte is likely to continue to intensify during the next 24 hours. An upper level trough over the South Indian Ocean will approach Charlotte from the west in a day or so. The trough will produce northwesterly winds and those winds will cause the vertical wind shear to increase. Tropical Cyclone Charlotte will start to weaken when the wind shear increases.

Tropical Cyclone Charlotte will move around the northwestern part of a high pressure system over Australia during the next 24 hours. The high pressure system will steer Charlotte toward the southwest. On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone Charlotte will move parallel to the coast of Western Australia during the next 24 hours. Charlotte will remain far away from the coast during the next several days.

Tropical Cyclone Charlotte Develops Quickly Northwest of Australia

Tropical Cyclone Charlotte developed quickly over the South Indian Ocean northwest of Australia on Sunday. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Tropical Cyclone Charlotte was located at latitude 14.9°S and longitude 111.5°E which put it about 550 miles (890 km) north-northwest of Learmonth,, Australia. Charlotte was moving toward the southwest at 15 m.p.h (24 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 985 mb.

A low pressure system over the South Indian Ocean northwest of Australia strengthened quickly on Sunday and the Australia Bureau of Meteorology designated the system as Tropical Cyclone Charlotte. The circulation around Tropical Cyclone Charlotte organized rapidly. The inner end of a rainband wrapped around the southern and western sides of the center of circulation and an eye appeared to be forming. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Charlotte’s circulation. Storms near the core generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the tropical cyclone. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 140 miles (225 km) from the center of circulation.

Tropical Cyclone Charlotte will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Charlotte will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 30˚C. It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear. Tropical Cyclone Charlotte is likely to continue to intensify rapidly during the next 24 hours. Charlotte is likely to strengthen to the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon during the next 12 hours.

Tropical Cyclone Charlotte will move around the northwestern part of a high pressure system over Australia during the next 24 hours. The high pressure system will steer Charlotte toward the west-southwest. On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone Charlotte will move parallel to the coast of Western Australia during the next 24 hours. Charlotte will remain well away from the coast on Monday.

Tropical Cyclone Anika Makes Landfall near Wallal Downs

Tropical Cyclone Anika made landfall near Wallal Downs, Australia on Wednesday morning. At 10:00 a.m. EST on Wednesday the center of Tropical Cyclone Anika was located at latitude 20.1°S and longitude 120.6°E which put it about 20 miles (30 km) southwest of Wallal Downs, Australia. Anika was moving toward the south-southwest at 5 m.p.h (8 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 994 mb.

A Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Sandfire to Pardoo.

The center of Tropical Cyclone Anika made another landfall on the coast of Western Australia just to the west of Wallal Downs on Wednesday morning. Anika strengthened as it approached the coast. More thunderstorms developed near the center of Anika’s circulation. The inner end of a rainband wrapped around the southern and eastern sides of the center of circulation. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 60 miles (90 km) from the center of Tropical Cyclone Anika.

Tropical Cyclone Anika will move around the southwestern part of a high pressure system over Australia during the next 36 hours. The high will steer Anika toward the south-southeast. On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone Anika will move inland over Western Australia. The center of Anika could pass west of Telfer on Thursday. Tropical Cyclone Anika will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rains to parts of Western Australia. A Flood Warning is in effect for the Sandy Desert. Flood Watches are in effect for the Fitzroy River and the De Grey River. Anika will weaken gradually as it moves farther inland.

Tropical Cyclone Anika Strengthens near Western Australia

Tropical Cyclone Anika strengthened near the coast of Western Australia on Tuesday night. At 10:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday the center of Tropical Cyclone Anika was located at latitude 19.1°S and longitude 121.1°E which put it about 70 miles (110 km) southwest of Bidyadanga, Australia. Anika was moving toward the southwest at 9 m.p.h (15 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 997 mb.

A Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Bidyadanga to Pardoo.

Tropical Cyclone Anika strengthened a little near the coast of Western Australia southwest of Bidyadanga on Tuesday night. The inner end of a rainband wrapped around the southern and western sides of the center of Anika. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the center of circulation. Storms near the center generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the tropical cyclone. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 60 miles (95 km) from the center of Tropical Cyclone Anika.

Tropical Cyclone Anika will move around the western part of a high pressure system over Australia during the next 36 hours. The high pressure system will steer Anika toward the south-southwest during the next 12 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone Anika could make landfall on the coast of Western Australia near Wallal Downs in less than 12 hours. The high pressure system will steer Anika toward the south-southeast after it makes landfall.

Tropical Cyclone Anika will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 12 hours. Anika will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 30˚C. It will move through are region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear. Tropical Cyclone Anika could strengthen during the next 12 hours. Anika will start to weaken after the center moves back over land.

Tropical Cyclone Anika will continue to bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to parts of the coast of Western Australia. A Warning is in effect for the portion of the coast from Bidyadanga to Pardoo. Locally heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations. Flood Watches are in effect for the Fitzroy River, the De Grey River and the Sandy Desert.

Elsewhere over the South Indian Ocean, Tropical Cyclone Vernon continued to churn southeast of Diego Garcia. At 10:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday the center of Tropical Cyclone Vernon was located at latitude 17.9°S and longitude 84.4°E which put it about 1095 miles (1765 km) southeast of Diego Garcia. Vernon was moving toward the southwest at 7 m.p.h (11 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 994 mb.

Tropical Cyclone Anika Moves Back over Water

The center of Tropical Cyclone Anika moved back over water on Monday night. At 10:00 p.m. EST on Monday the center of Tropical Cyclone Anika was located at latitude 16.7°S and longitude 122.5°E which put it about 85 miles (140 km) north of Broome, Australia. Anika was moving toward the west-southwest at 8 m.p.h (13 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 997 mb.

The center of Tropical Cyclone Anika moved back over water near Beagle Bay on Monday night. New thunderstorms began to develop near the center of Anika after the center moved back over water. The strongest thunderstorms were occurring in bands southwest of the center of circulation and northeast of the center. Bands in other parts of Tropical Cyclone Anika consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. Storms near the center of Anika began to generated more upper level divergence.

Tropical Cyclone Anika will move around the northwestern part of a high pressure system over Australia during the next 24 hours. The high pressure system will steer Anika toward the southwest during that time period. Anika will move toward the south after it reaches the western end of the high pressure system in 24 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone Anika could make landfall on the coast of Western Australia between Bidyadanga and De Grey in 42 hours.

Tropical Cyclone Anika will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Anika will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 30˚C. It will move through are region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear. Tropical Cyclone Anika will strengthen during the next 24 hours. However a portion of Anika’s circulation will still be over land, which will inhibit intensification.

Tropical Cyclone Anika will continue to bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to parts of the coast of Western Australia. A Warning is in effect for the portion of the coast from Beagle Bay to Bidyadanga. The Warning includes Broome. A Watch is in effect for the portion of the coast from Bidyadanga to De Grey. Locally heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations. Flood Watches are in effect for the Fitzroy River, the De Grey River and the Sandy Desert.

Elsewhere over the South Indian Ocean, Tropical Cyclone Vernon continued to spin east-southeast of Diego Garcia. At 10:00 p.m. EST on Sunday the center of Tropical Cyclone Vernon was located at latitude 14.6°S and longitude 87.0°E which put it about 1115 miles (1785 km) east-southeast of Diego Garcia. Vernon was moving toward the south-southwest at 4 m.p.h (6 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 994 mb.

Tropical Cyclone Anika Moves along Western Australia Coast

Tropical Cyclone Anika moved along the coast of Western Australia on Sunday afternoon. At 1:00 p.m. EST on Sunday the center of Tropical Cyclone Anika was located at latitude 15.2°S and longitude 125.7°E which put it about 90 miles (145 km) southwest of Kalumburu, Australia. Anika was moving toward the southwest at 8 m.p.h (13 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1000 mb.

Tropical Cyclone Anika moved along the coast of Western Australia on Sunday afternoon. The center of Anika’s circulation was still over land. The strongest winds were occurring in the northwestern quadrant of Tropical Cyclone Anika, which was still over water. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 70 miles (110 km) in the northwestern quadrant of Anika. The winds over land were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

A Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Troughton Island to Beagle Bay. The Warning included Cape Leveque and Derby. A Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Beagle Bay to Bidyadanga. The Watch included Broome.

The circulation around Tropical Cyclone Anika remained well organized even though the center was over land. The inner end of a rainband wrapped around the northern side of the center of Anika. The strongest thunderstorms were occurring in a bands in the western side of the circulation. There was also a strong band in the eastern periphery of Tropical Cyclone Anika. Bands in other parts of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. Storms near the center of circulation generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the tropical cyclone.

Tropical Cyclone Anika will move around the northwestern part of a high pressure system over Australia. The high pressure system will steer Anika toward the southwest during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone Anika will continue to move along the coast of Western Australia. Anika will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to places near the coast. Locally heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations. Flood Warnings are in effect for the North Kimberly District and the West Kimberly District. Flood Watches are in effect for the Sandy Desert and for the Fitzroy River. The center of Anika could move back over water southwest of Kuri Bay on Monday.

Tropical Cyclone Anika is not likely to strengthen while the center is over land. However, since a portion of Anika’s circulation will be over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 30˚C, it could maintain its current intensity. Tropical Cyclone Anika will move through an area where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear. Anika could strengthen again, if the center of circulation moves back over water.

Elsewhere over the South Indian Ocean, Tropical Cyclone Vernon weakened east-southeast of Diego Garcia. At 1:00 p.m. EST on Sunday the center of Tropical Cyclone Vernon was located at latitude 12.4°S and longitude 88.3°E which put it about 1140 miles (1835 km) east-southeast of Diego Garcia. Vernon was moving toward the east at 13 m.p.h (09 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 978 mb.

Tropical Cyclone Anika Hits Western Australia

Tropical Cyclone Anika hit Western Australia on Saturday morning. At 10:00 a.m. EST on Saturday the center of Tropical Cyclone Anika was located at latitude 13.8°S and longitude 126.8°E which put it about 25 miles (40 km) northeast of Kalumburu, Australia. Anika was moving toward the southwest at 7 m.p.h (12 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 983 mb.

Tropical Cyclone Anika made landfall on the coast of Western Australia northeast of Kalumburu on Saturday morning. Anika was intensifying at the time of landfall. The inner end of a rainband wrapped around the center of Anika’s circulation and an eye was developing. The developing eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Tropical Cyclone Anika. Storms near the core generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the tropical cyclone. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 110 miles (175 km) from the center of Anika’s circulation.

A Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from the border between the Northern Territory and Western Australia and Kuri Bay. The Warning included Wyndham and Kalumburu. A Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Kuri Bay to Beagle Bay.

Tropical Cyclone Anika will move around the northwestern part of a high pressure system over Australia. The high pressure system will steer Anika toward the southwest during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone Anika will move along the coast of Western Australia. Anika will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to places near the coast. Locally heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations. Flood Watches are in effect for the East, North and West Kimberly River and for the Fitzroy River.

Tropical Cyclone Anika will weaken slowly while it moves along the coast of Western Australia. However, since almost half of Anika’s circulation will be over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 30˚C, the weakening will occur slowly. In addition, Tropical Cyclone Anika will move through an area where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear. Anika could strengthen again, if the center of circulation moves back over water.