Tropical Storm Bonnie Moves over Eastern North Pacific

Tropical Storm Bonnie moved over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean on Saturday. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Bonnie was located at latitude 11.3°N and longitude 88.0°W which put it about 130 miles (210 km) west-southwest of Managua, Nicaragua. Bonnie was moving toward the west at 16 m.p.h. (26 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1000 mb.

Tropical Storm Bonnie moved across Central America and over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean on Saturday. The center of Bonnie’s circulation moved along the border between Nicaragua and Costa Rica. Bonnie dropped heavy rain on parts of Nicaragua and Costa Rica. It took about 12 hours for Tropical Storm Bonnie to cross Central America. Bonnie’s circulation was intact when it emerged over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean. The inner end of a rainband wrapped around the center of Tropical Storm Bonnie and an eye was visible on conventional and microwave satellite images. A ring of strong thunderstorms surrounded the eye and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Storms near the center of circulation generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the tropical storm. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 70 miles (110 km) from the center of Bonnie.

Tropical Storm Bonnie will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. Bonnie will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28˚C. It will move under an upper level ridge over Central America and the Eastern North Pacific Ocean. The upper level winds are weak in the ridge and there will be little vertical wind shear. Tropical Storm Bonnie will intensify during the next 36 hours. Bonnie is likely to strengthen to a hurricane by Sunday night. A period of rapid intensification could occur. Bonnie could intensify to a major hurricane early next week.

Tropical Storm Bonnie will move south of a high pressure system over Mexico. The high pressure system will steer Bonnie toward the west-northwest during the next 36 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Bonnie will remain south of El Salvador and Guatemala.

Typhoon Chaba Hits Southern China

Typhoon Chaba hit southern China on Saturday morning. At 5:00 a.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Typhoon Chaba was located at latitude 21.5°N and longitude 111.0°E which put it about 25 miles (40 km) east of Wuchuan, China. Chaba was moving toward the north-northwest at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 95 m.p.h. (150 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 978 mb.

The center of Typhoon Chaba made landfall on the south coast of China near Wuchuan and Dianbai in Guangdong on Saturday morning. Typhoon Chaba was strengthening when it made landfall. A small circular eye was as the center of Chaba’s circulation. Winds to typhoon force extended out 60 miles (95 km) from the center of Chaba. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 190 miles (305 km) from the center of circulation.

Typhoon Chaba will move around the western end of a high pressure system over the Western North Pacific Ocean. The high pressure system will steer Chaba toward the north-northwest during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track Typhoon Chaba will move inland over southern China. Chaba will weaken gradually as it moves inland. Typhoon Chaba will bring strong winds and locally heavy rain to southwestern Guangdong. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations. There were reports a ship broke in two in heavy seas in the South China Sea.

Elsewhere over the Western North Pacific Ocean, Tropical Storm Aere brought gusty winds and heavy rain to the center Ryukyu Islands. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Aere was located at latitude 26.3°N and longitude 129.1°E which put it about 115 miles (185 km) east-southeast of Okinawa. Aere was moving toward the north-northwest at 17 m.p.h. (19 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 994 mb.

Tropical Storm Colin Forms on South Carolina Coast

Tropical Storm Colin formed on the coast of South Carolina on Saturday morning. At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Colin was located at latitude 33.6°N and longitude 79.3°W which put it about 25 miles (40 km) west-southwest of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Colin was moving toward the northeast at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1012 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from South Santee River, South Carolina to Duck, North Carolina.

A small low pressure system dropped heavy rain over the area around Charleston, South Carolina on Friday. An area of winds to tropical storm force was detected off the coast of South Carolina on Saturday morning and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Storm Colin. The strongest winds were occurring in bands in the eastern side of Tropical Storm Colin, which was over the Atlantic Ocean. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 70 miles (110 km) in the eastern side of Colin’s circulation. The winds over land were weaker. The heaviest rain was also falling in the bands over the Atlantic Ocean.

Tropical Storm Colin will move through an environment that is unfavorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. Although the Sea Surface Temperatures off the coast of North Carolina are near 27˚C, the center of Colin’s circulation is likely to move along the coast. An upper level trough over the eastern U.S. will produce southwesterly winds that will cause moderate vertical wind shear. Proximity to land and vertical wind shear are likely to prevent Tropical Storm Colin from strengthening during the next 36 hours.

The upper level trough will steer Tropical Storm Colin toward the northeast during the next 36 hours. On its anticipated track, the center of Tropical Storm Colin will move along the coast of North Carolina. Colin could bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to the coast of North Carolina.

Elsewhere, Tropical Storm Bonnie was moving along the border between Nicaragua and Costa Rica. At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Bonnie was located at latitude 11.2°N and longitude 85.8°W which put it about 65 miles (105 km) southeast of Managua, Nicaragua. Bonnie was moving toward the west at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb. Tropical Storm Bonnie will move over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean in a few hours.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the Caribbean coast from Limon, Costa Rica to Sandy Bay Sirpi, Nicaragua. A Tropical Storm Warning was also in effect for the portion of the Pacific coast from Cabo Blanco, Costa Rica to the border between Nicaragua and Honduras.

Tropical Storm Bonnie Hits Nicaragua and Costa Rica

Tropical Storm Bonnie hit southern Nicaragua and northern Costa Rica on Friday night. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Bonnie was located at latitude 10.9°N and longitude 83.8°W which put it about 75 miles (120 km) south of Bluefields, Nicaragua. Bonnie was moving toward the west at 16 m.p.h. (26 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 995 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the Caribbean coast from Limon, Costa Rica to Sandy Bay Sirpi, Nicaragua. A Tropical Storm Warning was also in effect for the portion of the Pacific coast from Cabo Blanco, Costa Rica to the border between Nicaragua and Honduras.

The center of Tropical Storm Bonnie made landfall on the Caribbean coast near the border between Nicaragua and Costa Rica on Friday night. Bonnie was beginning to strengthen rapidly just prior to landfall. A reconnaissance plane reported an eye with a diameter of 12 miles (19 km) had developed at the center of Tropical Storm Bonnie. The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 115 miles (185 km) on the northern side of Bonnie’s circulation. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 20 miles (30 km) on the southern side of Tropical Storm Bonnie.

Tropical Storm Bonnie will move south of the western part of a high pressure system over the western Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea. The high pressure system will steer Bonnie toward the west during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Bonnie will move along the border between Nicaragua and Costa Rica. Bonnie will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to southern Nicaragua and northern Costa Rica. Heavy rain could cause flash floods and mudslides in some locations. Bonnie will move over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean on Saturday.

Tropical Storm Bonnie will weaken while it moves over land. Mountains are likely to disrupt the low level circulation and to cause the developing eye and eyewall to dissipate. Bonnie will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28˚C when it moves over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean. Bonnie is forecast to strengthen back to a tropical storm when it moves over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean and it could intensify to a hurricane in a couple of days.

Chaba Strengthens to a Typhoon Northeast of Hainan

Former Tropical Storm Chaba strengthened to a typhoon northeast of Hainan Island on Friday afternoon. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Typhoon Chaba was located at latitude 20.4°N and longitude 111.8°E which put it about 100 miles (160 km) southeast of Wuchuan, China. Chaba was moving toward the northwest at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 981 mb.

Former Tropical Storm Chaba strengthened to a typhoon over the warm water in the northern South China Sea on Friday afternoon. The inner end of a rainband wrapped around the center of Typhoon Chaba’s circulation and the strongest winds were occurring in a ring around the center. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Typhoon Chaba. Storms near the core generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the typhoon. Winds to typhoon force extended out 60 miles (95 km) from the center of Chaba. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 180 miles (290 km) from the center of circulation.

Typhoon Chaba will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 12 hours. Chaba will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. It will move under the middle of an upper level ridge over the northern part of the South China Sea. The upper level winds are weak near the center of the ridge and there will be little vertical wind shear. Typhoon Chaba could continue to intensify during the next 12 hours.

Typhoon Chaba will move around the western end of a high pressure system over the Western North Pacific Ocean during the next 24 hours. The high will steer Chaba toward the northwest. On its anticipated track the center of Typhoon Chaba could make landfall on the coast of southern China near Wuchuan in 12 hours. Chaba will bring strong winds and locally heavy rain to southwestern Guangdong. Heavy rain is likely to cause flash floods in some locations.

Elsewhere over the Western North Pacific Ocean, Tropical Storm Aere intensified gradually southeast of Okinawa. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Aere was located at latitude 23.6°N and longitude 130.4°E which put it about 305 miles (495 km) southeast of Okinawa. Aere was moving toward the north-northwest at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 994 mb. Tropical Storm Aere is forecast to move toward the north-northwest and to continue to strengthen gradually. Aere could be near Okinawa in 18 hours.

Tropical Storm Bonnie Forms over Southwest Caribbean Sea

Tropical Storm Bonnie formed over the Southwestern Caribbean Sea on Friday morning. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Bonnie was located at latitude 11.2°N and longitude 81.9°W which put it about 195 miles (315 km) east-southeast of Bluefields, Nicaragua. Bonnie was moving toward the west at 20 m.p.h. (32 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1005 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for San Andres Island, Colombia. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the Caribbean coast from Limon, Costa Rica to Sandy Bay Sirpi, Nicaragua. A Tropical Storm Warning was also in effect for the portion of the Pacific coast from Cabo Blanco, Costa Rica to the border between Nicaragua and Honduras.

A U.S. Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter reconnaissance aircraft found westerly winds in the southwestern part of former Potential Tropical Cyclone Two on Friday morning. Based on data from the reconnaissance plane, the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Storm Bonnie. More thunderstorms formed in bands revolving around the center of Tropical Storm Bonnie. Storms near the center of Bonnie generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the tropical storm. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 100 miles (160 km) in the northern side of Bonnie’s circulation. Winds in the southern side of Tropical Storm Bonnie were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Bonnie will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 12 hours. Bonnie will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28˚C. It will be under an upper level ridge over the Southwestern Caribbean Sea. The upper level winds are weak in the ridge and there will be little vertical wind shear. Tropical Storm Bonnie will strengthen during the next 12 hours. Bonnie will weaken when it moves over Nicaragua and Costa Rica, but it could strengthen again over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean on Saturday.

Tropical Storm Bonnie will move south of the western part of a high pressure system over the western Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea. The high pressure system will steer Bonnie toward the west during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Bonnie will hit southern Nicaragua and northern Costa Rica on Friday night. Bonnie will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to southern Nicaragua and northern Costa Rica. Heavy rain could cause flash floods and mudslides in some locations.

Tropical Storm Chaba Strengthens South of Hong Kong

Tropical Storm Chaba strengthened over the South China Sea south of Hong Kong on Thursday night. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Chaba was located at latitude 18.6°N and longitude 113.7°E which put it about 275 miles (445 km) south of Hong Kong, China. Chaba was moving toward the northwest at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 991 mb.

Tropical Storm Chaba strengthened south of Hong Kong on Thursday night. The inner end of a rainband wrapped around most of the center of circulation. The strongest winds were occurring in the part of the rainband wrapped around the center. Bands of thunderstorms were occurring in the southern half of Chaba’s circulation. Bands in the northern half of Chaba contained more showers and lower clouds. Storms near the center of circulation pumped mass away to the south and west of the tropical storm. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 140 miles (225 km) from the center.

Tropical Storm Chaba will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the 24 hours. Chaba will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. It will move under the middle of an upper level ridge over the northern part of the South China Sea. The upper level winds are weak near the center of the ridge and there will be little vertical wind shear. Tropical Storm Chaba will continue to intensify during the next 24 hours and it could strengthen to a typhoon.

Tropical Storm Chaba will move around the western end of a high pressure system over the Western North Pacific Ocean during the next 24 hours. The high will steer Chaba toward the northwest. On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Storm Chaba could be near the northeastern part of Hainan Island in 18 hours. Chaba could approach the coast of southern China near Zhanjiang in 24 hours. Chaba could be a typhoon when it approaches southern China. It will bring strong winds and locally heavy rain. Heavy rain is likely to cause flash floods in some locations.

Elsewhere over the Western North Pacific Ocean, Tropical Storm Aere formed south-southeast of Okinawa. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Aere was located at latitude 20.8°N and longitude 130.8°E which put it about 470 miles (760 km) south-southeast of Okinawa. Aere was moving toward the east-northeast at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1000 mb. Tropical Storm Aere is forecast to move toward the north-northwest and to strengthen gradually. Aere could be near Okinawa in 36 hours.

Potential Tropical Cyclone Two Moves Toward Nicaragua

Potential Tropical Cyclone Two moved over the Southwestern Caribbean Sea toward Nicaragua on Thursday night. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Potential Tropical Cyclone Two was located at latitude 11.8°N and longitude 77.7°W which put it about 410 miles (665 km) east of Bluefields, Nicaragua. Potential Tropical Cyclone Two was moving toward the west at 21 m.p.h. (33 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1005 mb.

A Hurricane Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Laguna de Perlas, Nicaragua to the border with Costa Rica. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for San Andres Island, Colombia. A Tropical Storm Warning was also in effect for the portion of the coast from Limon, Costa Rica to Sandy Bay Sirpi, Nicaragua. A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the Pacific Coast from Cabo Blanco, Costa Rica to Puerto Sandino, Nicaragua.

Potential Tropical Cyclone Two exhibited more organization on Thursday night. More thunderstorms developed near the center of circulation. A reconnaissance aircraft found that the surface pressure had decreased slightly. However, there were still parts of the circulation that consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. The strongest winds were occurring in the northern half of the circulation. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 80 miles (130 km) on the northern side of Potential Tropical Cyclone Two. The winds in the southern half of the circulation were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Potential Tropical Cyclone Two will move through an environment favorable for the development of a tropical cyclone during the next 24 hours. It will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28˚C. Potential Tropical Cyclone Two will move under an upper level ridge over the Southwestern Caribbean Sea. The upper level winds are weak in the ridge and there will be little vertical wind shear. Potential Tropical Cyclone Two could develop into a tropical storm on Friday.

Potential Tropical Cyclone Two will move south of the western part of a high pressure system over the western Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea. The high pressure system will steer Potential Tropical Cyclone Two toward the west during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track Potential Tropical Cyclone Two will begin to affect southern Nicaragua and northern Costa Rica on Friday evening. It could be a tropical storm when it approaches the coast. It will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to southern Nicaragua and northern Costa Rica. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations.

Tropical Storm Chaba Forms over South China Sea

Tropical Storm Chaba formed over the South China Sea south of Hong Kong on Wednesday night. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Chaba was located at latitude 15.7°N and longitude 115.1°E which put it about 440 miles (710 km) south of Hong Kong, China. Chaba was moving toward the northeast at 6 m.p.h. (10 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1000 mb.

The circulation around a low pressure system over the South China Sea south of Hong Kong strengthened on Wednesday night and the Japan Meteorological Agency designated the system as Tropical Storm Chaba. The distribution of thunderstorms around Tropical Storm Chaba was asymmetrical. The strongest thunderstorms were occurring in bands in the western half of Chaba’s circulation. Bands in the eastern half of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 115 miles (185 km) from the center of circulation.

An upper level ridge over southern China was producing northeasterly winds that were blowing toward the top of Tropical Storm Chaba. Those winds were causing moderate vertical wind shear. The wind shear was contributing to the asymmetrical distribution of thunderstorms.

Tropical Storm Chaba will move through an environment somewhat favorable for intensification during the 36 hours. Chaba will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. However, the upper level ridge over southern China will continue to cause vertical wind shear. The wind shear will inhibit intensification, but the shear will not be strong enough to prevent some intensification of Chaba. Tropical Storm Chaba is likely to intensify gradually during the next 36 hours.

Tropical Storm Chaba will move around the western end of a high pressure system over the Western North Pacific Ocean during the next 36 hours. The high will steer Chaba toward the north-northwest. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Chaba could approach Hainan Island and the coast of southern China in 36 hours.

Tropical Wave Brings Gusty Winds and Rain to Southern Windward Islands

A tropical wave, currently designated as Potential Tropical Cyclone Two brought gusty winds and locally heavy rain to the southern Windward Islands on Tuesday night. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Potential Tropical Cyclone Two was located at latitude 10.9°N and longitude 62.0°W which put it about 105 miles (165 km) west-northwest of Trinidad. Potential Tropical Cyclone Two was moving toward the west-northwest at 26 m.p.h. (43 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1011 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was issued for the coast of Venezuela from Peninsula de Paraguana to the border with Colombia. A Tropical Storm Warning was also issued for the coast of Colombia from Santa Marta to the border with Venezuela. Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for Aruba, Bonaire, Curacao and Grenada. Tropical Storm Warnings were also in effect for Islas de Margarita, Coche and Cubagua. A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Perdanales to Cumana, Venezuela.

A tropical wave speeding into the southeastern Caribbean Sea brought gusty winds and locally heavy rain to the southern Windward Islands on Tuesday night. Aircraft reconnaissance and surface observations indicated that the wave did not have a well defined center of circulation at the surface. So, the tropical was was still designated as Potential Tropical Cyclone Two.

Satellite images suggested that the circulation around Potential Tropical Cyclone Two was exhibiting more organization. Thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in bands in the northern part of the tropical wave. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 60 miles (95 km) from the center of Potential Tropical Cyclone Two. The winds in the southern half of the system were blowing at less than tropical storm force. Storms near the center of Potential Tropical Cyclone Two began to generate upper level divergence.

The tropical wave will move south of the western end of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean during the next few days. The high pressure system will steer the tropical wave toward the west. On its anticipated track Potential Tropical Cyclone Two will move near the northern coast of South America during the next 36 hours. It could reach Aruba, Bonaire and Curacao in less than 24 hours.

The tropical wave will move through an environment that is mostly favorable for the development of a tropical cyclone during the next 24 hours. The wave will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28˚C. It will move through a region where the winds in the troposphere will blow from the east at most levels and there will be little vertical wind shear. The southern part of the wave will move over northern parts of Venezuela and Colombia. Southerly winds flowing into the tropical wave could bring drier air from South America into the southern part of Potential Tropical Cyclone Two. If the center of Potential Tropical Cyclone Two remains over the Caribbean Sea, then the circulation around the tropical wave could gradually become more organized during the next 24 hours. If a distinct center of circulation forms at the surface, then the tropical wave would be classified as a tropical storm.