Tropical Cyclone Freddy Moves Away from Western Australia

Tropical Cyclone Freddy moved away from Western Australia on Wednesday morning. At 10:00 a.m. EST on Wednesday the center of Tropical Cyclone Freddy was located at latitude 16.1°S and longitude 112.7°E which put it about 440 miles (710 km) north of Learmonth, Australia. Freddy was moving toward the west-southwest at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 115 m.p.h. (185 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 972 mb.

Tropical Cyclone Freddy started to weaken as it moved away from Western Australia on Wednesday morning. Freddy was moving under the northwestern part of an upper level ridge over Australia. The upper level ridge was producing easterly winds that were blowing toward the top of Freddy’s circulation. Those winds were causing moderate vertical wind shear. The wind shear caused the distribution of thunderstorms in Tropical Cyclone Freddy to become asymmetrical. Many of the thunderstorms were occurring in bands in the western half of Freddy’s circulation. Bands in the eastern side of Freddy consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. Winds to hurricane/typhoon force extended out 30 miles (50 km) from the center of Tropical Cyclone Freddy. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 115 miles (185 km) from the center of circulation.

Tropical Cyclone Freddy will move through an environment that is unfavorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Freddy will move over over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28˚C. However, the upper level ridge over Australia will continue to cause moderate vertical wind shear. The wind shear is likely to cause Tropical Cyclone Freddy to weaken during the next 24 hours. The wind shear could lessen when Freddy moves farther west on Friday. If the shear lessens, then Tropical Cyclone Freddy could start to intensify again.

Elsewhere, Tropical Cyclone Gabrielle strengthened over the Coral Sea. At 10:00 a.m. EST on Wednesday the center of Tropical Cyclone Gabrielle was located at latitude 17.2°S and longitude 152.8°E which put it about 450 miles (725 km) east of Cairns, Australia. Gabrielle was moving toward the south-southwest at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 983 mb. Tropical Cyclone Gabrielle is forecast to move toward the southeast and to strengthen to the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon.

Tropical Cyclone Gabrielle Forms over the Coral Sea

Tropical Cyclone Gabrielle formed over the Coral Sea on Tuesday night. At 10:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday the center of Tropical Cyclone Gabrielle was located at latitude 15.7°S and longitude 153.3°E which put it about 230 miles (370 km) east-northeast of Willis Island. Gabrielle was moving toward the south-southwest at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 995 mb.

A low pressure system over the Coral Sea strengthened on Tuesday night and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology designated the system as Tropical Cyclone Gabrielle. The inner end of a rainband wrapped around the northern and eastern side of the center of Gabrielle’s circulation. Other bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the center of circulation. Storms near the center generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the tropical cyclone. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 65 miles (105 km) from the center of Tropical Cyclone Gabrielle.

Tropical Cyclone Gabrielle will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Gabrielle will move over over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. It will move under the center of an upper level ridge over the Coral Sea. The upper level winds are weak near the center of the ridge and there will be little vertical wind shear. Tropical Cyclone Gabrielle will intensify during the next 24 hours. Gabrielle could intensify rapidly at times and it could strengthen to the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon.

Tropical Cyclone Gabrielle will move around the western end of a high pressure system over the Southwest Pacific Ocean during the next 24 hours. The high pressure system will steer Gabrielle toward the south. On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone Gabrielle will remain east of Australia. An upper level trough over Australia will steer Gabrielle toward the southeast later this week.

Tropical Cyclone Freddy Rapidly Intensifies to Equivalent of Hurricane/Typhoon

Tropical Cyclone Freddy rapidly intensified to the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon over the South Indian Ocean north of Western Australia on Monday night. At 10:00 p.m. EST on Monday the center of Tropical Cyclone Freddy was located at latitude 14.1°S and longitude 117.2°E which put it about 400 miles (645 km) northwest of Broome, Australia. Freddy was moving toward the southwest at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 972 mb.

Tropical Cyclone Freddy rapidly intensified to the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon on Monday. The inner end of a rainband wrapped completely around the center of Freddy’s circulation. A small circular eye formed at the center of Tropical Cyclone Freddy. The eye was surrounded by a ring of thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Freddy’ circulation. Storms near the core generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the tropical cyclone. Winds to hurricane/typhoon force extended out 25 miles (40 km) from the center of Tropical Cyclone Freddy. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 100 miles (160 km) from the center of circulation.

Tropical Cyclone Freddy will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. Freddy will move over over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. It will move under the axis of an upper level ridge over the South Indian Ocean. The upper level winds are weak near the axis of the ridge and there will be little vertical wind shear. Tropical Cyclone Freddy will intensify during the next 36 hours and it is likely to strengthen rapidly at times. Freddy could intensify to the equivalent of a major hurricane during the next 36 hours.

Tropical Cyclone Freddy will move around the northwestern part of a high pressure system over Western Australia. The high pressure system will steer Freddy toward the west-southwest during the next 36 hours. On its anticipated track, Tropical Cyclone Freddy will stay northwest of Western Australia.

Tropical Cyclone Freddy Develops Rapidly North of Western Australia

Tropical Cyclone Freddy developed rapidly over the South Indian Ocean north of Western Australia on Monday morning. At 10:00 a.m. EST on Monday the center of Tropical Cyclone Freddy was located at latitude 12.8°S and longitude 118.4°E which put it about 440 miles (710 km) northwest of Broome, Australia. Freddy was moving toward the southwest at 5 m.p.h. (8 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 992 mb.

The circulation around a low pressure system over the South Indian Ocean north of Western Australia strengthened rapidly on Monday morning and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology designated the system as Tropical Cyclone Freddy. The inner end of a rainband wrapped around the southern and western sides of the center of Freddy’s circulation. Other bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the center of Tropical Cyclone Freddy. Storms near the center of circulation generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the tropical cyclone. The circulation around Tropical Cyclone Freddy was small. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 70 miles (110 km) from the center of Freddy.

Tropical Cyclone Freddy will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. Freddy will move over over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. It will move under the axis of an upper level ridge over the South Indian Ocean. The upper level winds are weak near the axis of the ridge and there will be little vertical wind shear. Tropical Cyclone Freddy will intensify during the next 36 hours and it could strengthen rapidly at times. Freddy is likely to intensify to the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon during the next 36 hours. It could strengthen to the equivalent of a major hurricane later this week.

Tropical Cyclone Freddy will move around the northwestern part of a high pressure system over Western Australia. The high pressure system will steer Freddy toward the west-southwest during the next 36 hours. On its anticipated track, Tropical Cyclone Freddy will stay north of Western Australia.

Elsewhere over the South Indian Ocean, a Tropical Low (also designated as Invest 94S) was east of Cocos Islands. At 10:00 a.m. EST on Monday the center of the Tropical Low was located at latitude 12.5°S and longitude 99.9°E which put it about 210 miles (335 km) east of Cocos Islands. The Tropical Low was moving toward the southeast at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 998 mb. The Tropical Low is forecast to turn toward the southwest and to strengthen to a tropical cyclone later this week.

Tropical Cyclone Could Form East of Sri Lanka

A tropical cyclone could form over the Bay of Bengal east of Sri Lanka during the next 24 hours. A low pressure system over the southern Bay of Bengal was designated as Invest 90B on Monday. At 10:00 p.m. EST on Monday the center of the low pressure system was located at latitude 8.5°N and longitude 84.5°E which put it about 185 miles (300 km) east-northeast of Batticaloa, Sri Lanka. The low pressure system was moving toward the west at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1004 mb.

The circulation around a low pressure system over the Bay of Bengal east of Sri Lanka strengthened on Monday. More thunderstorms formed near the center of the low pressure system and the inner end of a rainband wrapped partly around the center of circulation. More thunderstorms formed in bands revolving around the center. Storms near the center of circulation generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away to the west of the low pressure system.

The low pressure system will move through an environment favorable for the formation of a tropical cyclone during the next 24 hours. The low pressure system will move over over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 27˚C. It will move under the western end of an upper level ridge centered over Southeast Asia. The ridge will produce southeasterly winds that will blow toward the top of the low pressure system. Those winds will cause vertical wind shear and the shear will inhibit somewhat the formation of a tropical cyclone. However, the wind shear may not be strong enough to prevent the low pressure system from strengthening into a tropical cyclone. Invest 90B could strengthen to a tropical cyclone during the next 24 hours.

The low pressure system will move south of a strong high pressure system over southern Asia. The high pressure system will steer the low pressure system toward the west-southwest. On its anticipated track the low pressure system could reach the east coast of Sri Lanka within 24 hours. The low pressure system will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to Sri Lanka. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations.

Tropical Cyclone Cheneso Strengthens Back to Equivalent of Hurricane/Typhoon

Tropical Cyclone Cheneso strengthened back to the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon southwest of Madagascar on Friday night. At 10:00 a.m. EST on Saturday the center of Tropical Cyclone Cheneso was located at latitude 26.2°S and longitude 42.0°E which put it about 200 miles (320 km) west-southwest of Tsiombe, Madagascar. Cheneso was moving toward the south-southeast at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 105 m.p.h. (165 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 974 mb.

Tropical Cyclone Cheneso strengthened back to the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon on Friday night after it moved away from cooler water it had mixed to the surface of the Mozambique Channel west of Madagascar. A circular eye formed at the center of Cheneso’s circulation. The eye was surrounded by a broken ring of thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Tropical Cyclone Cheneso appeared to be pulling drier air around the northern side of its circulation. Many of the thunderstorms were occurring in bands in the southern half of Cheneso. Bands in the northern half of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. Storms near the center of circulation generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away to the east of the tropical cyclone. Winds to hurricane/typhoon force extended out 50 miles (80 km) from the center of Tropical Cyclone Cheneso. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 175 miles (280 km) from the center of circulation.

Tropical Cyclone Cheneso will move into an environment that will be unfavorable for a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Cheneso will move over over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 27˚C during the next 24 hours. However, Tropical Cyclone Cheneso will start to move over colder water on Sunday. An upper level trough near southern Africa will produce northwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of Cheneso’s circulation. Those winds will cause the vertical wind shear to increase. The combination of colder water and more vertical wind shear will cause tropical cyclone Cheneso to make a transition to an extratropical cyclone during the next 48 hours.

The upper level trough near southern Africa will steer Tropical Cyclone Cheneso toward the southeast during the next 48 hours. On its anticipated track Cheneso will pass south of Madagascar on Saturday night. Tropical Cyclone Cheneso will move quickly away from Madagascar on Sunday.

Tropical Cyclone Cheneso Spins West of Madagascar

Tropical Cyclone Cheneso was spinning west of southern Madagascar on Friday morning. At 10:00 a.m. EST on Friday the center of Tropical Cyclone Cheneso was located at latitude 23.0°S and longitude 41.6°E which put it about 150 miles (240 km) west-northwest of Taliara, Madagascar. Cheneso was moving toward the south-southwest at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 989 mb.

Tropical Cyclone Cheneso was spinning over the Mozambique Channel west of southern Madagascar on Friday morning. Cheneso was starting to move away from cooler water that it mixed to the surface of the Mozambique Channel while it was stationary earlier this week. The inner end of a rainband wrapped around the center of Cheneso’s circulation and an eye appeared to be forming again. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Tropical Cyclone Cheneso. Storms near the core generated more upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the tropical cyclone. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 150 miles (240 km) from the center of Cheneso.

Tropical Cyclone Cheneso will move into an environment favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Cheneso will move over over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. It will be under the western end of an upper level ridge that is centered east of Madagascar. The ridge will produce northwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of Cheneso’s circulation. Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear, but the shear will not be enough to prevent intensification. Tropical Cyclone Cheneso is likely to intensify during the next 24 hours. It could strengthen back to the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon.

Tropical Cyclone Cheneso will move around the western end of a high pressure system over the Southwest Indian Ocean during the next 24 hours. The high pressure system will steer Cheneso toward the south. On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Cyclone Cheneso will remain west of Madagascar. Thunderstorms in bands in the eastern side of Cheneso could produce locally heavy rain over southern Madagascar. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations.

An upper level trough over southern Africa will steer Tropical Cyclone Cheneso toward the southeast during the weekend. The trough will cause the vertical wind shear to increase. Cheneso will move over cooler water when it moves southeast. A combination of more vertical wind shear and cooler water will cause Tropical Cyclone Cheneso to make a transition to an extratropical cyclone during the weekend.

Tropical Cyclone Cheneso Weakens West of Madagascar

Tropical Cyclone Cheneso weakened west of Madagascar on Wednesday night. At 10:00 a.m. EST on Thursday the center of Tropical Cyclone Cheneso was located at latitude 20.4°S and longitude 42.6°E which put it about 110 miles (175 km) west-southwest of Morondava, Madagascar. Cheneso was moving toward the south-southwest at 3 m.p.h. (5 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 980 mb.

Tropical Cyclone Cheneso was nearly stationary over the Mozambique Channel west of Madagascar for 36 hours. The winds in the lower levels of the atmosphere mixed cooler water to the surface of the Mozambique Channel. Cheneso extracted less energy from the cooler water and it weakened slightly. A ring of thunderstorms around the center of Tropical Cyclone Cheneso weakened. The strongest thunderstorms were occurring in the southern part of the ring around the center. Other bands of thunderstorms were revolving around the center of Cheneso’s circulation. Winds to hurricane/typhoon force extended out 30 miles (50 km) from the center of Tropical Cyclone Cheneso. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 115 miles (185 km) from the center of circulation.

A surface high pressure system over the Southwest Indian Ocean will move southeast during the next several days. Tropical Cyclone Cheneso will move around the northwestern side of the high pressure system during the next 24 hours. The high pressure system will steer Cheneso toward the southwest during the next day or so. On its anticipated track, Tropical Cyclone Cheneso will move parallel to the coast of southwestern Madagascar during the next 24 hours. Bands in the eastern side of Cheneso’s circulation will drop locally heavy rain over western Madagascar. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations.

Tropical Cyclone Cheneso will move into an environment favorable for intensification after it moves southwest of the cooler water it mixed to the surface. Cheneso will move over over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. It will be under the axis of an upper level ridge that stretches from Madagascar westward across southern Africa. The upper level winds are weak near the axis of the ridge and there will be little vertical wind shear. Tropical Cyclone Cheneso is likely to intensify during the next 24 hours.

Tropical Cyclone Cheneso Strengthens to Equivalent of a Hurricane/Typhoon

Tropical Cyclone Cheneso strengthened to the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon over the Mozambique Channel west of Madagascar on Tuesday. At 10:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday the center of Tropical Cyclone Cheneso was located at latitude 20.1°S and longitude 43.0°E which put it about 75 miles (120 km) west of Morondava, Madagascar. Cheneso was nearly stationary. The maximum sustained wind speed was 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 977 mb.

Tropical Cyclone Cheneso rapidly intensified to the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon over the warm water in the Mozambique Channel west of Madagascar on Tuesday. The inner end of a rainband wrapped most of the way around Cheneso’s circulation. A circular eye appeared to be developing at the center of circulation. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Tropical Cyclone Cheneso. Storms near the core generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the tropical cyclone. Winds to hurricane/typhoon force extended out 20 miles (30 km) from the center of Cheneso. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 150 miles (240 km) from the center of circulation.

Tropical Cyclone Cheneso will be in an environment favorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. Cheneso will be over over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. It will be under the axis of an upper level ridge that stretches from Madagascar westward across southern Africa. The upper level winds are weak near the axis of the ridge and there will be little vertical wind shear. Tropical Cyclone Cheneso will intensify during the next 36 hours. Cheneso could intensify rapidly at times. Tropical Cyclone Cheneso could strengthen to the equivalent of a major hurricane in two or three days.

Tropical Cyclone Cheneso will be in a region where the steering winds are weak during the next 24 hours. Cheneso could be nearly stationary during much of Wednesday. The northwestern part of a high pressure system over the Southwest Indian Ocean will start to steer Tropical Cyclone Cheneso toward the southwest in 24 to 36 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone Cheneso will remain near the west coast of Madagascar during the next 24 hours. Bands of showers and thunderstorms in the eastern side of Cheneso’s circulation could continue to drop locally heavy rain over parts of the west coast of Madagascar. Heavy rain falling on saturated ground is likely to cause flooding in some locations.

Tropical Cyclone Cheneso Moves over Mozambique Channel

Tropical Cyclone Cheneso moved over the Mozambique Channel on Monday night. At 10:00 p.m. EST on Monday the center of Tropical Cyclone Cheneso was located at latitude 20.2°S and longitude 42.5°E which put it about 100 miles (160 km) west of Morondava, Madagascar. Cheneso was moving toward the west at 11 m.p.h. (17 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 999 mb.

Tropical Cyclone Cheneso emerged over the Mozambique Channel after moving slowly toward the southwest across northern Madagascar during the past 4 days. Bands of thunderstorms were developing quickly over the warm water in the Mozambique Channel. The inner end of a rainband wrapped around the southern and western sides of the center of Cheneso’s circulation. Storms near the center began to generate upper level divergence again that pumped mass way from the tropical cyclone. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 90 miles (145 km) from the center of circulation.

Tropical Cyclone Cheneso will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. Cheneso will move over over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. It will move under an upper level ridge that stretches from the South Indian Ocean westward across southern Africa. The upper level winds are weak near the axis of the ridge and there will be little vertical wind shear. Tropical Cyclone Cheneso will intensify during the next 36 hours. Cheneso could intensify rapidly at times and it is likely to strengthen to the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon.

Tropical Cyclone Cheneso will move around the northwestern part of a high pressure system over the Southwest Indian Ocean. The high pressure system will steer Cheneso slowly toward the west during the next 36 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone Cheneso will move gradually farther to the west of Madagascar. Bands of showers and thunderstorms in the eastern side of Cheneso’s circulation could continue to drop locally heavy rain over parts of the west coast of Madagascar.