Subtropical Storm Nicole Prompts Hurricane Watch for South Florida

A probable threat posed by Subtropical Storm Nicole prompted the issuance of a Hurricane Watch for part of South Florida on Monday. At 1:00 p.m. EST on Monday the center of Subtropical Storm Nicole was located at latitude 26.4°N and longitude 70.1°W which put it about 465 miles (720 km) east of the Northwestern Bahamas. Nicole was moving toward the northwest at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1001 mb.

A Hurricane Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from the Volusia/Brevard County Line to Hallandale Beach, Florida. The Hurricane Watch included Melbourne, West Palm Beach and Ft. Lauderdale. A Hurricane Watch was in effect for Lake Okeechobee. A Hurricane Watch was in effect for the Northwestern Bahamas. A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Altamaha Sound, Georgia to the Volusia/Brevard County Line, Florida. The Tropical Storm Watch included Jacksonville and Daytona Beach. A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Hallandale Beach to Ocean Reef, Florida. The Tropical Storm Watch included Miami.

Subtropical Storm Nicole was churning over the Atlantic Ocean east of the Bahamas on Monday afternoon. The circulation around Subtropical Storm Nicole continued to exhibit a complex structure that is fairly common late in the hurricane season. The surface center of circulation was northeast of an upper level low east of Florida. The strongest winds near the surface were occurring far to the east of the surface center. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 275 miles (445 km) in the eastern side of Subtropical Storm Nicole. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 80 miles (130 km) in the northwestern quadrant of Nicole. The winds in the southwestern quadrant of Nicole’s circulation were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Subtropical Storm Nicole will move through an environment that is favorable for a gradual transition to a tropical storm during the next 48 hours. Nicole will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28˚C. The upper level low east of Florida will produce southerly winds that will blow across the top of the surface center of Subtropical Storm Nicole during the next 24 hours. Those winds will cause moderate vertical wind shear and the wind shear will inhibit intensification. Nicole will move into a region where the upper level winds are weaker on Tuesday and the wind shear will diminish. Subtropical Storm Nicole is likely to strengthen gradually during the next 24 hours. Nicole will move over warmer water when it moves over the Gulf Stream on Wednesday. Subtropical Storm Nicole is likely to make a transition to a tropical storm when it moves over the warmer water. Nicole could intensify to a hurricane when it moves over the warmer water.

The upper level low east of Florida will steer Subtropical Storm Nicole toward the northwest during the next 18 hours. A surface high pressure system currently over the Great Lakes will move over the East Coast of the U.S. and the western Atlantic Ocean. The high pressure system will block Nicole from moving toward the north. The high pressure system will steer Nicole toward the west-southwest on Tuesday and Wednesday. On its anticipated track Subtropical Storm Nicole could reach the Northwestern Bahamas on Wednesday morning. Nicole could reach the coast of Southeast Florida on Wednesday night. Nicole could be a hurricane when it reaches Florida. Nicole is likely to bring strong, gusty winds and locally heavy rain to the Northwestern Bahamas and southern Florida. The winds in the northern side of Nicole will blow water toward the coast of Florida and the Southeast U.S. Those winds will cause a storm surge and serious beach erosion when Nicole moves toward the coast.

Subtropical Storm Nicole Forms East of the Bahamas

Subtropical Storm Nicole formed east of the Bahamas on Monday morning. At 7:00 a.m. EST on Monday the center of Subtropical Storm Nicole was located at latitude 25.9°N and longitude 69.1°W which put it about 520 miles (835 km) east of the Northwestern Bahamas. Nicole was moving toward the north-northwest at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb.

A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the Northwestern Bahamas.

A large low pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean east of the Bahamas exhibited more organization on Monday morning and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Subtropical Storm Nicole. The circulation around Subtropical Storm Nicole exhibited a complex structure that is fairly common late in the hurricane season. The surface center of circulation was northeast of an upper level low east of Florida. The strongest winds near the surface were occurring far to the east of the surface center. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 275 miles (445 km) in the eastern side of Subtropical Storm Nicole. The winds in the western side of Nicole’s circulation were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Subtropical Storm Nicole will move through an environment that is favorable for a gradual transition to a tropical storm. Nicole will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28˚C. The upper level low east of Florida will produce southerly winds that will blow across the top of the surface center of Subtropical Storm Nicole during the next 24 hours. Those winds will cause moderate vertical wind shear and the wind shear will inhibit intensification. Nicole will move into a region where the upper level winds are weaker on Tuesday and the wind shear will diminish. Subtropical Storm Nicole is likely to strengthen gradually during the next 24 hours. Nicole will move over warmer water when it moves over the Gulf Stream on Wednesday. Subtropical Storm Nicole is likely to make a transition to a tropical storm when it moves over the warmer water. Nicole could intensify to a hurricane when it moves over the warmer water.

The upper level low east of Florida will steer Subtropical Storm Nicole toward the northwest during the next 24 hours. A surface high pressure system currently over the Great Lakes will move over the East Coast of the U.S. and the western Atlantic Ocean. The high pressure system will block Nicole from moving toward the north. The high pressure system will steer Nicole toward the west-southwest on Tuesday and Wednesday. On its anticipated track Subtropical Storm Nicole could reach the Northwestern Bahamas on Wednesday morning. Nicole could reach the coast of Southeast Florida on Wednesday night. Nicole could be a hurricane when it reaches Florida. Nicole is likely to bring strong, gusty winds and locally heavy rain to the Northwestern Bahamas and southern Florida. The winds in the northern side of Nicole will blow water toward the coast of Florida and the Southeast U.S. Those winds will cause a storm surge and serious beach erosion when Nicole moves toward the coast.

Hurricane Lisa Hits Belize

Hurricane Lisa hit the coast of Belize late on Wednesday afternoon. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Hurricane Lisa was located at latitude 17.4°N and longitude 88.2°W which put it about 5 miles (10 km) south of Belize City, Belize. Lisa was moving toward the west at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 990 mb.

Hurricane Warnings were in effect for Belize, and for the portion of the coast from Chetumal to Puerto Costa Maya, Mexico. Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the North Coast of Guatemala and the portion of the coast from Chetumal to Punta Allen, Mexico.

Hurricane Lisa intensified steadily until it made landfall on the coast of Belize late on Wednesday afternoon. Winds to hurricane force extended out 20 miles (30 km) from the center of Lisa in the northern side of Lisa. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 70 miles (110 km) from the center of circulation.

Hurricane Lisa will move south of a high pressure system over the Gulf of Mexico. The high pressure system will steer Lisa toward the west-northwest during the next 36 hours. On its anticipated track, Hurricane Lisa will move inland over Belize on Wednesday evening. Lisa will bring strong winds and heavy rain to Belize. The strongest winds are north of the center of Hurricane Lisa. Lisa could bring strong winds to Belize City during the next several hours. Hurricane Lisa will also cause a storm surge of up to 8 feet (2.5 meters) along the coast of Belize. Lisa will weaken steadily as it moves farther inland. The center of Lisa will move over northern Guatemala during Wednesday night. Lisa could reach the Bay of Campeche as a tropical depression on Thursday night. Hurricane Lisa will drop heavy rain over Belize, northern Guatemala and southeastern Mexico. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, former Tropical Storm Martin intensified to a hurricane south of Newfoundland. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Hurricane Martin was located at latitude 37.1°N and longitude 47.6°W which put it about 720 miles (1160 km) south-southeast of Cape Race, Newfoundland. Martin was moving toward the northeast at 31 m.p.h. (50 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 974 mb.

Lisa Intensifies to a Hurricane North of Honduras

Former Tropical Storm Lisa intensified to a hurricane north of Honduras on Wednesday morning. At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Hurricane Lisa was located at latitude 17.2°N and longitude 84.7°W which put it about 100 miles (160 km) east-southeast of Belize City, Belize. Lisa was moving toward the west at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 988 mb.

Hurricane Warnings were in effect for Belize, the Bay Islands, Honduras, and for the portion of the coast from Chetumal to Puerto Costa Maya, Mexico. Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the entire North Coast of Honduras, the North Coast of Guatemala, and the portion of the coast from Chetumal to Punta Allen, Mexico.

A U.S. Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter plane found that former Tropical Storm Lisa had strengthened to a hurricane on Wednesday morning. The inner end of a rainband wrapped most of the way around the center of Hurricane Lisa. Other bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Lisa’s circulation. Storms near the core generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the hurricane. The circulation around Hurricane Lisa was small. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 70 miles from the center of Lisa.

Hurricane Lisa will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next few hours. Lisa will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. It will move under the axis of an upper level ridge over the Caribbean Sea. The upper level winds are weak near the axis of the ridge and there will be little vertical wind shear. Hurricane Lisa is likely to strengthen during the next few hours.

Hurricane Lisa will move south of a high pressure system over the Gulf of Mexico. The high pressure system will steer Lisa toward the west during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track, Hurricane Lisa will make landfall on the coast of Belize in a few hours. Lisa will bring strong winds and heavy rain to Belize. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations. Hurricane Lisa will also cause a storm surge of up to 8 feet (2.5 meters) along the coast of Belize.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, Tropical Storm Martin intensified developed east-northeast of Bermuda. At 5:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Martin was located at latitude 35.3°N and longitude 52.1°W which put it about 755 miles (1220 km) east-northeast of Bermuda. Martin was moving toward the east-northeast at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 989 mb.

Tropical Storm Lisa Strengthens, Hurricane Warning Issued for Belize

Tropical Storm Lisa strengthened over the Northwest Caribbean Sea northeast of Honduras on Tuesday afternoon and a Hurricane Warning was issued for the entire coast of Belize. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Storm Lisa was located at latitude 16.7°N and longitude 83.3°W which put it about 330 miles (530 km) east of Belize City, Belize. Lisa was moving toward the west at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1000 mb.

Hurricane Warnings were in effect for Belize and the Bay Islands, Honduras. A Hurricane Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Chetumal to Puerto Costa Maya, Mexico. Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the entire North Coast of Honduras, the coast of Guatemala, and the portion of the coast from Chetumal to Punta Herrero, Mexico.

Tropical Storm Lisa strengthened on Tuesday. The inner end of a rainband wrapped around the center of Lisa’s circulation. Other bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Tropical Storm Lisa. Storms near the core generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the tropical storm. The circulation around Tropical Storm Lisa was small. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 70 miles (110 km) from the center of circulation.

Tropical Storm Lisa will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Lisa will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. It will move under the axis of an upper level ridge over the Caribbean Sea. The upper level winds are weak near the axis of the ridge and there will be little vertical wind shear. Tropical Storm Lisa is likely to strengthen to a hurricane during the next 12 hours. Lisa could intensify more rapidly after an inner core with an eye and an eyewall forms.

Tropical Storm Lisa will move south of a high pressure system over the Gulf of Mexico. The high pressure system will steer Lisa toward the west during the next 36 hours. On its anticipated track, the center of Tropical Storm Lisa will be north of Honduras on Tuesday night. Lisa will approach Belize on Wednesday afternoon. Tropical Storm Lisa will be a hurricane when it approaches Belize. Tropical Storm Lisa could bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to the north coast of Honduras. Lisa will bring strong winds and heavy rain to Belize. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations. Lisa will also cause a storm surge along the coast of Belize.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, Tropical Storm Martin developed east-northeast of Bermuda. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Storm Martin was located at latitude 35.4°N and longitude 54.5°W which put it about 630 miles (1010 km) east-northeast of Bermuda. Martin was moving toward the east at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 991 mb.

Tropical Storm Lisa Develops South of Jamaica

Tropical Storm Lisa developed over the Caribbean Sea south of Jamaica on Monday morning. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Storm Lisa was located at latitude 15.5°N and longitude 77.3°W which put it about 175 miles (285 km) south of Kingston, Jamaica. It was moving toward the west at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1003 mb.

A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for Jamaica.

The National Hurricane Center designated former Potential Tropical Cyclone Fifteen as Tropical Storm Lisa on Monday morning. The distribution of thunderstorms in Tropical Storm Lisa was still asymmetrical. Thunderstorms were occurring in bands in the eastern side of Lisa’s circulation. Bands in the western side of Tropical Storm Lisa consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 100 miles (160 km) in the eastern side of Lisa. The winds in the western side of the circulation were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Lisa will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. Lisa will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. It will move under the western part of an upper level ridge over the Caribbean Sea. The upper level ridge will produce southwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of Lisa’s circulation. Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear, but the wind shear will not be enough to prevent intensification. Tropical Storm Lisa is likely to strengthen gradually during the next 36 hours.

Tropical Storm Lisa will move south of a high pressure system over the western Atlantic Ocean. The high pressure system will steer Potential Tropical Cyclone Fifteen toward the west during the next 36 hours. On its anticipated track, the center of Tropical Storm Lisa could be north of Honduras by Tuesday night. Lisa could approach Belize on Wednesday afternoon. Tropical Storm Lisa could be a hurricane when it approaches Belize.

Nalgae Strengthens to a Typhoon South-Southeast of Hong Kong

Former Tropical Storm Nalgae strengthened to a typhoon over the South China Sea south-southeast of Hong Kong on Monday. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Monday the center of Typhoon Nalgae was located at latitude 18.2°N and longitude 116.3°E which put it about 310 miles (500 km) south-southeast of Hong Kong. Nalgae was moving toward the north-northwest at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 981 mb.

Typhoon Nalgae strengthened gradually over the South China Sea south-southeast of Hong Kong on Monday. A large eye with a diameter of 30 miles (50 km) formed at the center of Nalgae’s circulation. A broken ring of thunderstorms surrounded the eye and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the center of Typhoon Nalgae. Storms near the center of circulation generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the typhoon. Winds to typhoon force extended out 20 miles (30 km) in the western side of Nalgae. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 330 miles (515 km) from the center of circulation.

Typhoon Nalgae will move through an environment mostly favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Nalgae will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. It will move under the western side of an upper level ridge over the Western North Pacific. The upper level ridge will produce southerly winds that will blow toward the top of Nalgae’s circulation. Those winds will cause vertical wind shear, but the wind shear will not be strong enough to prevent intensification. Typhoon Nalgae is likely to intensify during the next 24 hours. Nalgae will move into an environment where there is drier air in the lower levels of the atmosphere when it moves closer to China. Typhoon Nalgae will weaken when the drier air gets pulled into its circulation.

Typhoon Nalgae will move around the western end of a high pressure system over the Western North Pacific Ocean. The high pressure system will steer Nalgae toward the northwest during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track Typhoon Nalgae will move closer to Hong Kong during the next 24 hours. Nalgae will move more toward the west when it encounters the drier environment near China and weakens.

Elsewhere over the Western North Pacific Ocean, Tropical Storm Banyan developed east of the Philippines. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Storm Banyan was located at latitude 7.3°N and longitude 131.2°E which put it about 320 miles (515 km) east of Mindanao. Banyan was moving toward the west-northwest at 11 m.p.h. (17 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1000 mb.

Low Pressure System over Caribbean Sea Prompts Tropical Storm Watches for Jamaica and Grand Cayman

A low pressure system over the central Caribbean Sea prompted the issuance of Tropical Storm Watches for Jamaica and Grand Cayman on Sunday afternoon. The National Hurricane Center designated the low pressure system as Potential Tropical Cyclone Fifteen. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Potential Tropical Tropical Cyclone Fifteen was located at latitude 15.7°N and longitude 73.6°W which put it about 265 miles (425 km) southeast of Kingston, Jamaica. It was moving toward the west-northwest at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1005 mb.

Tropical Storm Watches were issued for Jamaica and Grand Cayman.

Reconnaissance planes from the U.S. Air Force Reserve and NOAA found winds to tropical storm force in the northern side of a low pressure system over the central Caribbean Sea on Sunday. Based on data collected by the planes, the National Hurricane Center designated the low pressure system as Potential Tropical Cyclone Fifteen. There was a large counterclockwise rotation around the low pressure system. Several small counterclockwise swirls were revolving around the larger low pressure system. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 115 miles (185 km) in the northern side of Potential Tropical Cyclone Fifteen. The winds in the southern half of the low pressure system were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Potential Tropical Cyclone Fifteen will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. It will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. It will move under the northwestern part of an upper level ridge over the eastern two thirds of the Caribbean Sea. The upper level ridge will produce southwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of Potential Tropical Cyclone Fifteen. Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear, but the wind shear will not be enough to prevent intensification. Potential Tropical Cyclone Fifteen will be designated as a tropical storm if more thunderstorms form closer to the center of circulation. It could eventually strengthen to a hurricane later this week.

Potential Tropical Cyclone Fifteen will move south of a high pressure system over the western Atlantic Ocean. The high pressure system will steer Potential Tropical Cyclone Fifteen toward the west-northwest during the next 36 hours. On its anticipated track, the center of Potential Tropical Cyclone Fifteen will pass south of Jamaica on Monday. It will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to Jamaica. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations.

Tropical Storm Nalgae Causes Floods and Mudslides in the Philippines

Tropical Storm Nalgae caused floods and mudslides in the Philippines on Saturday. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Nalgae was located at latitude 15.9°N and longitude 119.8°E which put it about 100 miles (160 km) north-northwest of Manila, Philippines. Nalgae was moving toward the northwest at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 994 mb.

Tropical Storm Nalgae dropped heavy rain as it moved across Luzon on Saturday. Heavy rain caused floods and mudslides in some locations. There were reports of deaths and injuries that were caused by the floods and mudslides. Tropical Nalgae did weaken as it moved across Luzon, but some bands were still dropping heavy rain in places. The center of Nalgae was about to move over the South China Sea. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 175 miles (280 km) from the center of Nalgae’s circulation.

Tropical Storm Nalgae will move through an environment mostly favorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. Nalgae will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. Nalgae will move under the western side of an upper level ridge over the Western North Pacific. The upper level ridge will produce southerly winds that will blow toward the top of Nalgae’s circulation. Those winds will cause vertical wind shear, but the wind shear will not be strong enough to prevent intensification. Tropical Storm Nalgae is likely to intensify when it move over the South China Sea. Nalgae could strengthen to a typhoon during the next 36 hours.

Tropical Storm Nalgae will move around the western end of a high pressure system over the Western North Pacific Ocean. The high pressure system will steer Nalgae toward the northwest during the next 36 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Nalgae will move away from northern Luzon. The heavy rain in the Philippines will diminish when Nalgae moves farther away from Luzon.

Tropical Storm Nalgae Brings Wind and Rain to the Philippines

Tropical Storm Nalgae brought wind and rain to the Philippines on Friday. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Nalgae was located at latitude 14.3°N and longitude 123.1°E which put it about 175 miles (280 km) east of Manila, Philippines. Nalgae was moving toward the west-northwest at 22 m.p.h. (35 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 988 mb.

Tropical Storm Nalgae strengthened on Friday as it approached southeastern Luzon. The inner end of a rainband wrapped around the eastern side of the center of Nalgae. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Tropical Storm Nalgae. Storms near the core generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the tropical storm. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 200 miles (320 km) from the center of Nalgae.

Tropical Storm Nalgae will move around the southern side of a high pressure system over the Western North Pacific Ocean. The high pressure system will steer Nalgae toward the west-northwest during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Nalgae will move quickly across Luzon. Nalgae will continue to produce gusty winds and locally heavy rain in Luzon during the next 24 hours. Heavy rain is likely to cause flash floods in some locations.

Tropical Storm Nalgae will move through an environment mostly favorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. When the center of Nalgae is over water, it will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. An upper level ridge over the Western North Pacific will produce northeasterly winds that will blow toward the top of Nalgae’s circulation. Those winds will cause vertical wind shear, but the wind shear will not be strong enough to prevent intensification. Tropical Storm Nalgae will be unlikely to intensify while the center of its circulation is over Luzon. Nalgae could intensify when the center moves over the South China Sea.