Tag Archives: South Carolina

Tropical Depression Nicole Drops Heavy Rain over Southeast U.S.

Tropical Depression Nicole dropped heavy rain over parts of the southeastern U.S. on Friday morning. At 10:00 a.m. EST on Friday the center of Tropical Depression Nicole was located at latitude 34.2°N and longitude 84.3°W which put it about 35 miles (55 km) north of Atlanta, Georgia. Nicole was moving toward the north-northeast at 23 m.p.h. (37 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 30 m.p.h. (50 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1001 mb.

Tropical Storm Nicole dropped heavy rain over parts of the southeastern U.S. on Friday morning. Heavy rain was falling over eastern Tennessee and eastern Kentucky. Bands in the far eastern side of Nicole’s circulation contained thunderstorms that were dropping heavy rain over parts of eastern South Carolina, eastern North Carolina and southeastern Virginia. Easterly winds blowing around the northern side of Nicole’s circulation were enhancing convergence and rising motion ahead of a cold front moving toward the eastern U.S. The enhanced convergence and rising motion was contributing to rain that was falling in the region from Delaware to Ohio.

The cold front approaching the eastern U.S. and an upper level trough over the central U.S. will steer Tropical Depression Nicole quickly toward the north-northeast during Friday. On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Depression Nicole will be over West Virginia by Friday evening. Heavy rain falling over parts of the southeastern U.S. and Appalachians could cause flooding. Flood Watches were in effect for parts of northern South Carolina, western North Carolina and southern Virginia. There could be enough low level wind shear for tornadoes to develop in the bands on the far eastern side of the circulation around Tropical Depression Nicole. A Tornado Watch was in effect for eastern South Carolina, eastern North Carolina and southeastern Virginia.

Tropical Storm Nicole Brings Wind and Rain to Florida

Tropical Storm Nicole brought wind and rain to Florida on Thursday. At 4:00 p.m. EST on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Nicole was located at latitude 29.4°N and longitude 83.2°W which put it about 25 miles (40 km) northwest of Cedar Key, Florida. Nicole was moving toward the northwest at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 990 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from the Flagler/Volusia County Line, Florida to Altamaha Sound, Georgia. The Tropical Storm Warning included Jacksonville. A Tropical Storm Warning was also in effect for the portion of the coast from Aripeka to Indian Pass, Florida.

Tropical Storm Nicole brought wind and rain as it moved across Central Florida. Nicole weakened gradually as it moved across the Florida Peninsula, but it still had a well organized circulation. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the center of circulation. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 170 miles (275 km) from the center of Nicole’s circulation.

The strongest winds in Tropical Storm Nicole occurred near the east coast of Florida on Thursday. A weather station in Daytona Beach reported a sustained wind speed of 49 m.p.h. (79 km/h) and a wind gust of 70 m.p.h. (113 km/h). A weather station in St. Augustine reported a sustained wind speed of 46 m.p.h. (74 km/h) and a wind gust of 59 m.p.h. (95 km/h). A weather station in Jacksonville reported a sustained wind speed of 37 m.p.h. (59 km/h) and a wind gust of 56 m.p.h. (91 km/h). The winds were weaker along the west coast of Florida. A weather station in Tampa reported a sustained wind speed of 29 m.p.h. (46 km/h) and a wind gust of 53 m.p.h. (85 km/h).

An upper level trough and a surface cold front over the central U.S. will turn Tropical Storm Nicole toward the northeast during Thursday night. The center of Nicole will be over southern Georgia on Thursday night and it could be over western South Carolina by Friday afternoon. Tropical Storm Nicole will continue to weaken during the next 24 hours. Nicole will produce gusty winds over northern Florida, southern Georgia and parts of South Carolina. Those winds could cause scattered power outages. The large waves causing serious beach erosion along the east coast of Florida will start to diminish on Friday. Waves could cause some erosion of beaches in Georgia and South Carolina on Friday when Tropical Storm Nicole moves farther to the north. Nicole could drop locally heavy rain over parts of northern Florida, southern Georgia, and South Carolina. Heavy rain could cause floods in some locations.

Hurricane Nicole Makes Landfall in Florida

Hurricane Nicole made landfall in Florida early on Thursday. Nicole weakened to a tropical storm after it made landfall. At 4:00 a.m. EST on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Nicole was located at latitude 27.8°N and longitude 80.7°W which put it about 60 miles (95 km) southeast of Orlando, Florida. Nicole was moving toward the west-northwest at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 70 m.p.h. (110 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 85 m.p.h. (145 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 981 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Boca Raton, Florida to South Santee River, South Carolina. The Tropical Storm Warning included West Palm Beach, Ft. Pierce, Daytona Beach, Jacksonville, and Charleston, South Carolina. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for Lake Okeechobee. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Bonita Beach to Indian Pass, Florida, The Tropical Storm Warning included Tampa and St. Petersburg.

According to the National Hurricane Center, the center of Hurricane Nicole made landfall on the east coast of Florida just to the south of Vero Beach. The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km) at the time of landfall. Winds to hurricane force extended out 25 miles (40 km) in the eastern side of Nicole’s circulation at the time of landfall. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 450 miles (725 km) from the center of circulation.

Hurricane Nicole weakened to a tropical storm after the center moved inland over Central Florida, but Nicole was bringing strong, gusty winds to Central Florida. A weather station in Vero Beach reported a sustained wind speed of 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and a wind gust of 60 m.p.h. (97 km/h). A weather station in Melbourne reported a sustained wind speed of 52 m.p.h. (84 km/h) and a wind gust of 64 m.p.h. (103 km/h). A weather station in Orlando reported a sustained wind speed of 43 m.p.h. (69 km/h) and a wind gust of 63 m.p.h. (102 km/h). Tropical Storm Nicole was dropping heavy rain over parts of the Florida Peninsula.

Tropical Storm Nicole will move around the southwestern part of a surface high pressure system near the East Coast of the U.S. The high pressure system will steer Nicole toward the northwest during the next 12 hours. On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Storm Nicole will move over northern Florida on Thursday evening. An upper level trough and a cold front will approach Nicole from the west on Thursday night. The upper level trough and cold front will steer Tropical Storm Nicole toward the northeast on Friday. The center of Nicole could be over South Carolina on Friday afternoon.

Tropical Storm Nicole will weaken gradually as it moves across Central Florida. Nicole will continue to bring strong, gusty winds to central and northern Florida. Gusty winds could cause widespread power outages. Even though the center of Nicole will be inland, easterly winds will continue to blow water toward the east coast of Florida. Tropical Storm Nicole could cause a storm surge of up to 5 feet (1.5 meters) in some locations. Large waves will continue to cause significant beach erosion. Nicole will drop heavy rain over parts of central and northern Florida and southern Georgia. Heavy rain could cause fresh water floods in some locations.

Nicole Strengthens to a Hurricane East of Florida

Former Tropical Storm Nicole strengthened to a hurricane east of Florida on Wednesday evening. At 7:00 p.m. EST on Wednesday the center of Hurricane Nicole was located at latitude 26.6°N and longitude 78.5°W which put it about 100 miles (160 km) east of West Palm Beach, Florida. Nicole was moving toward the west at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 980 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Boca Raton to the Flagler/ Volusia County Line, Florida. The Hurricane Warning included West Palm Beach, Ft. Pierce, Melbourne and Daytona Beach. A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the Abacos, Berry Islands, and Grand Bahama Island. A Hurricane Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from the Boca Raton to Hallandale Beach, Florida. A Hurricane Watch was in effect for Lake Okeechobee. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for Bimini. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Hallandale Beach to Boca Raton, Florida. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for Lake Okeechobee. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from the Flagler/Volusia County Line, Florida to the South Santee River, South Carolina. The Tropical Storm Warning includes Jacksonville, Florida and Charleston, South Carolina. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Bonita Beach to Indian Pass, Florida. The Tropical Storm Warning included Tampa and St. Petersburg.

Former Tropical Storm Nicole intensified to a hurricane when it move over the warm water in the Gulf Stream Current on Wednesday evening. The eye of Hurricane Nicole was over Grand Bahama Island. The eye had a diameter of 30 miles (50 km). The eye was surrounded by a ring of thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in the northern part of that ring. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hurricane Nicole. Storms near the center generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the hurricane. The removal of mass caused the surface pressure to decrease at the center of circulation.

The strongest winds were occurring in the northern side of Hurricane Nicole, but the overall circulation was very large. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 480 miles (775 km) from the center of Nicole’s circulation. Stations along the east coast of Florida reported sustained wind speeds of tropical storm force on Wednesday evening. Electricity outages were reported in several areas. Northeasterly winds were pushing water toward the coast and water level rises were reported from South Carolina to Florida. Large waves were causing significant beach erosion along the east coast of Florida.

Hurricane Nicole will continue to move through an environment that is favorable for intensification during the next few hours. Nicole will move over warm water in the Gulf Stream Current where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28˚C. It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear. Hurricane Nicole will extract more energy from the warmer water and it is likely to strengthen a little more during the next few hours.

Hurricane Nicole will move around the southwestern part of a surface high pressure system currently over the northeastern U.S. The high pressure system will steer Nicole toward the west-northwest during the next 12 hours. On its anticipated track Hurricane Nicole will make landfall on the east coast of Florida near or just to the north of West Palm Beach on Wednesday night. Nicole will be a hurricane when it reaches Florida. Hurricane Nicole will continue to bring strong, gusty winds and locally heavy rain to the east coast of Florida. The winds in the northern side of Nicole will continue to blow water toward the coast of Florida and the Southeast U.S. Those winds could cause a storm surge of up to 6 feet (1.8 meters) in some locations. Large waves will keep breaking on the coast and they will cause significant beach erosion.

Hurricane Nicole will move northwest across Central Florida on Thursday. Nicole will weaken back to a tropical storm when it moves across Florida. Nicole could bring tropical storm force winds to the area around Orlando. The center of Nicole will be over northern Florida on Thursday evening. Widespread electricity outages could occur in central and northern Florida. Nicole will drop locally heavy rain over central and northern Florida, and southern Georgia. Heavy rain could cause fresh water floods in some locations.

Subtropical Storm Nicole Forms East of the Bahamas

Subtropical Storm Nicole formed east of the Bahamas on Monday morning. At 7:00 a.m. EST on Monday the center of Subtropical Storm Nicole was located at latitude 25.9°N and longitude 69.1°W which put it about 520 miles (835 km) east of the Northwestern Bahamas. Nicole was moving toward the north-northwest at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb.

A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the Northwestern Bahamas.

A large low pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean east of the Bahamas exhibited more organization on Monday morning and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Subtropical Storm Nicole. The circulation around Subtropical Storm Nicole exhibited a complex structure that is fairly common late in the hurricane season. The surface center of circulation was northeast of an upper level low east of Florida. The strongest winds near the surface were occurring far to the east of the surface center. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 275 miles (445 km) in the eastern side of Subtropical Storm Nicole. The winds in the western side of Nicole’s circulation were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Subtropical Storm Nicole will move through an environment that is favorable for a gradual transition to a tropical storm. Nicole will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28˚C. The upper level low east of Florida will produce southerly winds that will blow across the top of the surface center of Subtropical Storm Nicole during the next 24 hours. Those winds will cause moderate vertical wind shear and the wind shear will inhibit intensification. Nicole will move into a region where the upper level winds are weaker on Tuesday and the wind shear will diminish. Subtropical Storm Nicole is likely to strengthen gradually during the next 24 hours. Nicole will move over warmer water when it moves over the Gulf Stream on Wednesday. Subtropical Storm Nicole is likely to make a transition to a tropical storm when it moves over the warmer water. Nicole could intensify to a hurricane when it moves over the warmer water.

The upper level low east of Florida will steer Subtropical Storm Nicole toward the northwest during the next 24 hours. A surface high pressure system currently over the Great Lakes will move over the East Coast of the U.S. and the western Atlantic Ocean. The high pressure system will block Nicole from moving toward the north. The high pressure system will steer Nicole toward the west-southwest on Tuesday and Wednesday. On its anticipated track Subtropical Storm Nicole could reach the Northwestern Bahamas on Wednesday morning. Nicole could reach the coast of Southeast Florida on Wednesday night. Nicole could be a hurricane when it reaches Florida. Nicole is likely to bring strong, gusty winds and locally heavy rain to the Northwestern Bahamas and southern Florida. The winds in the northern side of Nicole will blow water toward the coast of Florida and the Southeast U.S. Those winds will cause a storm surge and serious beach erosion when Nicole moves toward the coast.

Hurricane Ian Makes Landfall in South Carolina

Hurricane Ian made landfall in South Carolina on Friday afternoon. According to the National Hurricane Center the center of Hurricane Ian officially made landfall near Georgetown, South Carolina at 2:05 p.m. EDT on Friday. At 2:05 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Hurricane Ian was located at latitude 33.3°N and longitude 79.2°W which put it about 55 miles (90 km) east-southeast of Charleston, South Carolina. Ian was moving toward the north at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 977 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Savannah River, Georgia to Cape Fear, North Carolina. The Hurricane Warning included Charleston, South Carolina. A Hurricane Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Cape Fear to Surf City, North Carolina. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Cape Fear to Duck, North Carolina. The Tropical Storm Warning included Pamlico Sound. A Tropical Storm Warning is also in effect for the portion of the coast from Altamaha Sound to Savannah River, Georgia.

The center of Hurricane Ian moved over the coast of South Carolina near Georgetown at 2:05 p.m. EDT on Friday. Ian was a Category 1 hurricane at the time of landfall. Winds to hurricane force extended out70 miles (110 km) from the center of Ian’s circulation. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 275 miles (445 km) from the center of circulation. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) was 12.7. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 12.7 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 30.9. Hurricane Ian was capable of causing regional minor damage.

Hurricane Ian was bringing strong gusty winds to the coastal areas of South Carolina on Friday afternoon. The weather station at the Charleston airport (KCHS) reported a sustained wind speed of 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and a wind gust of 68 m.p.h. (101 m.p.h.). Heavy rain was also falling over Charleston and there were reports of flooded streets. Hurricane Ian was causing a storm surge east of Georgetown where the winds were blowing water toward the coast. A surge of 4 to 7 feet (1.2 to 2.1 meters) was possible in the part of the coast between Georgetown and Cape Fear, North Carolina. A Storm Surge Warning is in effect for the portion of the coast from the Savannah River, Georgia to Cape Fear, North Carolina. Winds and waves were causing erosion along the coast.

Hurricane Ian will weaken gradually as it moves inland over eastern South Carolina. The center of Ian will move over south central South Carolina during Friday night. Ian will produce strong gusty winds over South Carolina and eastern and central North Carolina. Gusts to tropical storm force could affect the area around Charlotte, North Carolina. Minor wind damage and widespread electricity outages could occur in those areas. Gusty winds could push over trees in locations where the ground is saturated. Heavy rain was already falling over South Carolina, eastern North Carolina,, and southeastern Virginia. Flood Watches were in effect for much of South Carolina, North Carolina and southeastern Virginia. Southerly winds will push water toward the coast in places east of Georgetown, South Carolina. The storm surge is likely to continue in those places for a few more hours.

Hurricane Ian Approaches South Carolina

Hurricane Ian approached the coast of South Carolina on Friday morning. At 8:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Hurricane Ian was located at latitude 31.4°N and longitude 79.1°W which put it about 105 miles (165 km) south-southeast of Charleston South Carolina. Ian was moving toward the north at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 984 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Savannah River, Georgia to Cape Fear, North Carolina. The Hurricane Warning included Charleston, South Carolina. A Hurricane Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Cape Fear to Surf City, North Carolina. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Cape Fear to Duck, North Carolina. The Tropical Storm Warning included Pamlico Sound. A Tropical Storm Warning is also in effect for the portion of the coast from Altamaha Sound to Savannah River, Georgia.

Hurricane Ian did not have the typical structure of a tropical hurricane on Friday morning. Ian was in the middle of a transition to an extratropical cyclone. The circulation around Hurricane Ian was also interacting with a stationary front near the coast of the Carolinas. The result of these factors was that the strongest winds were occurring in the western side of Ian’s circulation. Winds to hurricane force extended out 70 miles (110 km) in the western side of Hurricane Ian. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 480 miles (775 km) in the northeaster quadrant of Ian. Tropical storm force winds extended out 185 miles (300 km) in the other parts of Ian’s circulation. The interaction with the stationary front was also causing the heaviest rain to fall in the northern half of Hurricane Ian.

The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Hurricane Ian is 12.7. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) is 20.6 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) is 33.3. Hurricane Ian is capable of causing widespread minor damage.

Hurricane Ian will move through an environment marginally favorable for intensification during the next few hours. Ian will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28˚C. An upper level trough over the eastern U.S. will produce southerly winds that will blow toward the top of Ian’s circulation. Those winds will cause moderate vertical wind shear. The wind shear will inhibit intensification. Hurricane Ian could get a little stronger before it makes landfall in South Carolina. The vertical wind shear will cause Hurricane Ian to continue its transformation to an extratropical cyclone.

The upper level trough will steer Hurricane Ian toward the north during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track the center Hurricane Ian could make landfall in South Carolina between Charleston and Myrtle Beach on Friday afternoon. Ian will be a Category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale when it reaches South Carolina. Ian will bring strong gusty winds and locally heavy rain. If Ian makes landfall east of Charleston, the the strongest winds will affect that city. Widespread minor wind damage and electricity outages could occur. Air revolving around the northern side of Ian’s circulation will interact with the stationary front near the coast to enhance the rising motion in that region. The enhanced rising motion could produce heavy rainfall near the stationary front. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations. Flood Watches are in effect for parts of South Carolina and North Carolina. Southeasterly winds blowing around the northeastern side of Hurricane Ian will blow water toward the coast. A storm surge of 4 to 7 feet (1.2 to 2.0 meters) could occur. A Storm Surge Warning is in effect for the portion of the coast from the Savannah River, Georgia to Cape Fear, North Carolina. Serious coastal erosion is likely.

Ian Strengthens Back to a Hurricane

One time major hurricane and former Tropical Storm Ian strengthened back to a hurricane over the Atlantic Ocean east of Florida on Thursday afternoon. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Hurricane Ian was located at latitude 29.3°N and longitude 79.9°W which put it about 240 miles (390 km) south of Charleston South Carolina. Ian was moving toward the north-northeast at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 986 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Savannah River, Georgia to Cape Fear, North Carolina. The Hurricane Warning included Charleston, South Carolina. A Hurricane Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Cape Fear to Surf City, North Carolina. A Hurricane Watch was also in effect for the portion of the coast from the Flagler/Volusia County Line, Florida to Savannah River, Georgia. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Cape Fear to Duck, North Carolina. The Tropical Storm Warning included Pamlico Sound. A Tropical Storm Warning is also in effect for the portion of the coast from Vero Beach, Florida to Savannah River, Georgia.

The structure of Hurricane Ian contains elements of a hurricane and elements of an extratropical cyclone. Ian has a warm core in the middle and upper troposphere, which makes it a hurricane. However, cooler, drier air wrapped around the southern side of Ian and a cold front is forming east of Ian. The developing cold front is an element of an extratropical cyclone. Many of the thunderstorms in Hurricane Ian are occurring in bands in the northern and western parts of Ian’s circulation.

The wind field around Hurricane Ian also changed when Ian started a transition to an extratropical cyclones. The circulation around Ian is interacting with a large high pressure system centered over the Great Lakes. The interaction of Ian’s circulation with the high pressure system is causing the strongest winds to be in the northwestern quadrant of Hurricane Ian. Winds to hurricane force extend out 45 miles (75 km) in the northwestern quadrant of Ian. The size of the circulation around Hurricane Ian also increased when it started the transition to an extratropical cyclone. Winds to tropical storm force extend out 400 miles (645 km) in the eastern side of Ian. Winds to tropical storm force extend out 230 miles (370 km) in the western side.

Hurricane Ian will move through an environment somewhat favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Ian will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. An upper level trough over the eastern U.S. will produce southwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of Ian’s circulation. Those winds will cause moderate vertical wind shear. The wind shear will inhibit intensification. Hurricane Ian could intensify, if the center moves over the warm water in the Gulf Stream current. More thunderstorms could form near the center of Ian’s circulation and could look more like a hurricane for a few hours. The vertical wind shear will eventually cause Hurricane Ian to gradually continue its transformation to an extratropical cyclone.

The upper level trough will steer Hurricane Ian toward the north-northeast during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track the center Hurricane Ian could make landfall in South Carolina on Friday afternoon. Ian is likely to be a Category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale when it reaches South Carolina. Ian will bring strong gusty winds and locally heavy rain. Widespread minor wind damage and electricity outages could occur. Air revolving around the northern side of Ian’s circulation will interact with a stationary front near the coast to enhance the rising motion in that region. The enhanced rising motion could produce very heavy rainfall near the stationary front. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations. Flood Watches are in effect for parts of South Carolina and North Carolina. Southeasterly winds blowing around the northeastern side of Hurricane Ian will blow water toward the coast. A storm surge of 4 to 7 feet (1.2 to 2.0 meters) could occur. A Storm Surge Warning is in effect for the portion of the coast from the Flagler/Volusia County Line, Florida to Cape Fear, North Carolina.

Tropical Storm Ian Near Cape Canaveral

The center of Tropical Storm Ian was near Cape Canaveral, Florida on Thursday morning. At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Ian was located at latitude 28.5°N and longitude 80.7°W which put it about 10 miles (15 km) west of Cape Canaveral, Florida. Ian was moving toward the northeast at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 987 mb.

A Hurricane Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from the Flagler/Volusia County Line, Florida to South Santee River, South Carolina. The Hurricane Watch included Savannah, Georgia and Charleston, South Carolina. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Jupiter Inlet, Florida to Cape Lookout, North Carolina. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Bonita Beach to Indian Pass, Florida. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for Lake Okeechobee.

Tropical Storm Ian was still producing strong winds along the east coast of Florida on Thursday morning. A National Weather Service station in Daytona Beach, Florida (KDAB) reported a sustained wind speed of 55 m.p.h. (89 km/h) and a wind gust of 76 m.p.h. (122 km/h).

Former major Hurricane Ian weakened to a tropical storm while it blew across Central Florida on Wednesday night. The structure of Ian also changed when it weakened. The areas of tropical storm force winds expanded over the Atlantic Ocean. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 400 miles (645 km) on the east side of Ian’s circulation. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 140 miles (220 km) on the western side of the circulation. Thunderstorms were occurring in bands in the northern and western parts of Tropical Storm Ian. Bands in the southern and eastern parts of Ian consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.

Tropical Storm Ian was in the early stage of a transition to an extratropical cyclone. An upper level trough over the eastern U.S. was producing southwesterly winds that were blowing toward the top of Ian’s circulation. Those winds were causing moderate vertical wind shear. The wind shear was tilting upper part of Ian’s circulation toward the northeast. The wind shear was also starting Ian’s transition to an extratropical cyclone. Drier air was wrapping around the southern side of Tropical Storm Ian. The drier air was contributing to the lack of heavy rain in the southern and eastern parts of Ian.

Tropical Storm Ian will move through an environment somewhat favorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. Ian will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. The upper level trough over the eastern U.S. will continue to produce southwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of Ian’s circulation. Those winds will continue to cause moderate vertical wind shear. The wind shear will inhibit intensification. Tropical Storm Ian could intensify, if the center moves over the warm water in the Gulf Stream current. Ian could strengthen back to a hurricane during the next 36 hours.

The upper level trough will steer Tropical Storm Ian toward the north during the next 36 hours. On its anticipated track the center Tropical Storm Ian could make landfall in South Carolina on Friday afternoon. Ian could be a strong tropical storm or a Category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale when it reaches South Carolina. Ian will bring strong gusty winds and locally heavy rain. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations. Easterly winds blowing around the northern side of Tropical Storm Ian will blow water toward the coast. A storm surge of 4 to 6 feet (1.2 to 1.8 meters could occur.

Hurricane Ian Pounds Southwest Florida

Hurricane Ian was pounding southwest Florida on Wednesday afternoon. At 3:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Hurricane Ian was located at latitude 26.7°N and longitude 82.2°W which put it about 20 miles (30 km) west-southwest of Punta Gorda, Florida. Ian was moving toward the north-northeast at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 150 m.p.h. (240 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 175 m.p.h. (280 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 940 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Chokoloskee to Anclote River, Florida. The Hurricane Warning included Tampa Bay. A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Sebastian Inlet to the Flagler/Volusia County Line, Florida. The Hurricane Warning included Melbourne and Daytona Beach. A Hurricane Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from the Flagler/Volusia County Line, Florida to the South Santee River, South Carolina. The Hurricane Watch included Savannah, Georgia and Charleston, South Carolina. A Hurricane Watch was in effect for Lake Okeechobee. Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for all of the Florida Keys. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Flamingo to Chokoloskee, Florida. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for Lake Okeechobee. A Tropcial Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Anclote River to Indian Pass, Florida. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Flamingo, Florida to South Santee River, South Carolina. Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for Bimini and Grand Bahama Island.

The National Hurricane Center stated that the center of Hurricane Ian officially made landfall on Cayo Costa, west-northwest of Ft. Myers at 3:10 p.m. EDT on Wednesday. Ian was a Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale at the time of landfall.

The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) was 31.6. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 18.1 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 49.7. Hurricane Ian was stronger and much bigger than Hurricane Charley was when Charley made landfall in Southwest Florida in 2004. Ian was similar in size and intensity to Hurricane Laura, when Laura hit Lake Charles, Louisiana in 2020. Hurricane Ian was also similar in size and intensity to Hurricane Michael when Michael hit Mexico Beach, Florida in 2018.

Hurricane Ian was producing strong gusty winds, locally heavy rain and a storm surge along the coast of Southwest Florida. A weather station maintained by the River, Estuary and Coastal Network at Redfish Pass, Florida reported a sustained wind speed of 94 m.p.h. (151 km/h) and a wind gust of 126 m.p.h. (203 km/h). A weather station at the Punta Gorda airport reported a wind gust of 124 m.p.h. (200 km/h). The Cape Coral Fire Department reported a wind gust of 110 m.p.h. (177 km/h). A station in Naples, Florida reported a storm surge of 9.05 feet (2.76 meters) and the water level was still rising. A station in Ft. Myers, Florida reported a storm surge of 5.76 feet (1.75 meters) and the water level was still rising.

An upper level trough over the eastern U.S. will steer Hurricane Ian toward the northeast during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track Hurricane Ian will move inland over Southwest Florida. Ian will move across Central Florida on Thursday. Hurricane Ian is likely to bring a prolonged period of strong gusty winds to Southwest Florida and to Central Florida. Ian will be capable of causing severe damage. A prolonged period of strong winds could cause widespread electricity outages. Hurricane Ian will move slowly inland and 10 to 20 inches of rain could fall in some locations. Fresh water flooding could occur in Central Florida. A storm surge of up to 12 to 16 feet (3.5 to 5 meters) could occur along the coast of Southwest Florida.

The center of Hurricane Ian could be near the east coast of Florida on Thursday afternoon. Hurricane Ian could bring strong, gusty winds to the coast of the Southeastern U.S. on Thursday night and Friday. The wind will blow water toward the coast and water levels will rise along the coast.