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Henri Strengthens to a Hurricane

Former Tropical Storm Henri strengthened to a hurricane on Saturday morning. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Hurricane Henri was located at latitude 34.4°N and longitude 72.5°W which put it about 180 miles (290 km) east-southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Henri was moving toward the north-northeast at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 991 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for eastern Long Island from Fire Island Inlet to Port Jefferson Harbor. A Hurricane Warning was also in effect for the portion of the coast from New Haven, Connecticut to Westport, Massachusetts. The Hurricane Warning included Block Island. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the south coast of Long Island from East Rockaway Inlet to Fire Island Inlet. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the north coast of Long Island from East Rockaway Inlet to Port Jefferson, Harbor. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from East Rockaway Inlet to New Haven, Connecticut. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect from the portion of the coast from Westport, Massachusetts to Chatham, Massachusetts. The Tropical Storm Warning included Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard. A Tropical Storm Warning was also in effect for the portion of the coast from East Rockaway Inlet, New York to Manasquan Inlet, New Jersey. The Tropical Storm Warning included New York City.

Reconnaissance planes found that former Tropical Storm Henri has strengthened to a hurricane on Saturday morning. More thunderstorms formed near the center of Henri and the inner end of a rainband wrapped around the north side of the center of circulation. Storms near the center generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the hurricane. The removal of mass caused the surface pressure to decrease. Winds to hurricane force extended out 60 miles in the southeastern quadrant of Henri. The winds in the other parts of the storm were blowing at less than hurricane force. Winds to tropical storm for extended out 130 miles (210 km) from the center of circulation.

Hurricane Henri will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 18 hours. Henri will move over the Gulf Stream where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29°C. It will move around the eastern side of an upper level trough over the eastern U.S. The trough will produce southwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of Henri’s circulation. Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear, but the shear will not be enough to prevent intensification. Hurricane Henri is likely to strengthen during the next 12 hours. Henri will move over cooler water when it moves north of the Gulf Stream on Sunday and that will cause it to weaken.

The upper level trough will steer Hurricane Henri toward the north-northeast during the next 12 hours. The position and orientation of the trough will change as it interacts with Hurricane Henri. The trough will pull Henri toward the north-northwest on Sunday. On its anticipated track Hurricane Henri will approach Long Island on Sunday afternoon. Henri could be a hurricane when it nears Long Island. Hurricane Henri is likely to cause minor wind damage on Long Island and in southern New England. Gusty winds and falling trees could cause widespread power outages. Henri could move slowly when it moves across southern New England. Locally heavy rain could cause flash floods. Hurricane Henri could cause a storm surge of up to 4 to 7 feet (1 to 2 meters) where the wind blows the water toward the coast.

Elsewhere, Tropical Storm Grace was dropping heavy rain over parts of central Mexico. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Grace was located at latitude 19.7°N and longitude 98.9°W which put it about 25 miles (40 km) north-northeast of Mexico City, Mexico. Grace was moving toward the west-southwest at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 70 m.p.h. (110 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 990 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Puerto Veracruz to Barra de Tordo, Mexico.

Grace Rapidly Intensifies to a Major Hurricane

Hurricane Grace rapidly intensified to a major hurricane near Mexico on Friday night. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Hurricane Grace was located at latitude 20.7°N and longitude 96.3°W which put it about 75 miles (120 km) east-southeast of Tuxpan, Mexico. Grace was moving toward the west at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 120 m.p.h. (195 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 140 m.p.h. (220 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 967 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Puerto Veracuz to Cabo Rojo, Mexico. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Cabo Rojo to Barra del Tordo, Mexico.

Hurricane Grace rapidly intensified to a major hurricane on Friday night. A circular eye with a diameter of 35 miles (55 km) was at the center of Grace. The eye was surround by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hurricane Grace. Storms near the core generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the hurricane. The removal of mass caused the surface pressure to decrease, which produced a rapid increase in the surface wind speed.

Hurricane Grace was an average sized hurricane. Winds to hurricane force extended out 30 miles (50 km) from the center of Grace. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 150 miles (240 km) from the center of circulation. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Grace was 22.1. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 11.2 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 33.3. Hurricane Grace was capable of regional major damage.

Hurricane Grace will move south of a high pressure system that extends over the Gulf of Mexico. The high pressure system will steer Grace toward the west during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track the center of Hurricane Grace will make landfall on the coast of Mexico between Tuxpan and Veracruz in a few hours. Grace will be capable of causing major wind damage. It will drop locally heavy rain and flash floods are likely. Hurricane Grace could cause a storm surge of up to 10 feet (3 meters) where the wind blows the water toward the coast. Grace will weaken quickly when it moves inland over Mexico, but heavy rain could cause flash floods over parts of Central Mexico,

Elsewhere, Tropical Storm Henri was moving toward the north off the East Coast of the U.S. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Henri was located at latitude 32.3°N and longitude 73.5°W which put it about 230 miles (375 km) south-southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Henri was moving toward the north at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 70 m.p.h. (85 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 994 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for eastern Long Island from Fire Island Inlet to Port Jefferson Harbor. A Hurricane Warning was also in effect for the portion of the coast from New Haven, Connecticut to Watch Hill, Rhode Island. A Hurricane Watch was in effect from Watch Hill, Rhode Island to Sagamore Beach, Massachusetts. The Hurricane Watch included Block Island, Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the south coast of Long Island from East Rockaway Inlet to Fire Island Inlet. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the north coast of Long Island from East Rockaway Inlet to Port Jefferson, Harbor. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from East Rockaway Inlet to New Haven, Connecticut. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect from the portion of the coast from Watch Hill, Rhode Island to Wood Hole, Massachusetts. The Tropical Storm Warning included Block Island and Martha’s Vineyard. A Tropical Storm Warning was also in effect for the portion of the coast from East Rockaway Inlet, New York to Manasquan Inlet, New Jersey. The Tropical Storm Warning included New York City.

Tropical Storm Henri Prompts Hurricane Watches for Long Island, Southeast New England

A potential threat from Tropical Storm Henri prompted the issuance of Hurricane Watches for parts of Long Island and southeastern New England on Friday morning. At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Henri was located at latitude 30.0°N and longitude 73.7°W which put it about 375 miles (600 km) southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Henri was moving toward the west-northwest at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 995 mb.

A Hurricane Watch was issued for eastern Long Island from Fire Island Inlet to Port Jefferson Harbor. A Hurricane Watch was also issued for the portion of the coast from New Haven, Connecticut to Sagamore Beach, Massachusetts. The Hurricane Watch included Block Island, Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket. A Tropical Storm Watch was issued for the south coast of Long Island from East Rockaway Inlet to Fire Island Inlet. A Tropical Storm Watch was issued for the north coast of Long Island from East Rockaway Inlet to Port Jefferson Harbor. A Tropical Storm Watch was also issued for the portion of the coast from East Rockaway Inlet to New Haven, Connecticut.

Tropical Storm Henri did not change much during Thursday night. The distribution of thunderstorms around Henri remained asymmetrical. The strongest thunderstorms were occurring in bands in the southern half of Henri. Bands in the northern half of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. Henri was moving under the southeastern part of an upper level ridge off the east coast of the U.S. The ridge was producing northeasterly winds that were blowing toward the top of Henri’s circulation. Those winds were causing moderate vertical wind shear and they were also contributing to the asymmetrical distribution of thunderstorms. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 90 miles (145 km) from the center of Henri.

Although Tropical Storm Henri is currently moving toward the west-northwest, an upper level trough over the eastern U.S. will turn Henri toward the north on Friday. The trough will steer Henri toward the north on Saturday. When Henri turns toward the north it will move under the axis of the upper level ridge. The upper level winds are weaker near the axis of the ridge and the wind shear will be less. Tropical Storm Henri is likely to strengthen to a hurricane on Saturday. Henri will move over the warm water in the Gulf Stream and there is a chance that Henri could strengthen to Category 2 on the Saffir-Simpson Scale.

A high pressure system will move northeast of Henri on Sunday. The high pressure system will block Henri and prevent it from moving toward the northeast. The high pressure system will also slow the forward speed of Henri. Henri could be moving slowly when it nears Long Island and southeastern New England. A slow forward speed would increase the time period when places experience strong gusty winds, which would increase the chance for wind damage and power outages. Slow movement would also increase the total rainfall in many locations and the risk for flash floods would increase. Henri could also cause a storm surge of up to 4 to 7 feet (1 to 2 meters) along the coast.

Elsewhere, former Tropical Storm Grace strengthened back to a hurricane over the southwestern Gulf of Mexico on Friday morning. At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Friday the center of Hurricane Grace was located at latitude 20.6°N and longitude 93.7°W which put it about 185 miles (300 km) east-northeast of Veracruz, Mexico. Grace was moving toward the west at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 983 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Puerto Veracuz to Cabo Rojo, Mexico. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Cabo Rojo to Barra del Tordo, Mexico.

Tropical Storm Fred Makes Landfall in Northwest Florida

Tropical Storm Fred made landfall on the coast of Northwest Florida near Cape San Blas on Monday afternoon. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Storm Fred was located at latitude 29.9°N and longitude 85.3°W which put it about 25 miles (40 km) northwest of Apalachicola Florida. Fred was moving toward the north-northeast at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 995 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from the Okaloosa/Walton County Line to the Stienhatchee River, Florida.

The National Hurricane Center stated that Tropical Storm Fred made landfall on the coast of Northwest Florida near Cape San Blas, which is about 25 miles (40 km) west of Apalachicola. The maximum sustained wind speed at the time of landfall was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and the minimum surface pressure was 994 mb. Fred was dropping heavy rain over parts of northwest Florida and southeast Alabama. There were reports of flash floods in some locations. Tropical Storm Fred was also causing a storm surge along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico where the wind was pushing the water toward the shore. A Storm Surge Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Indian Pass to Yankeetown, Florida.

Tropical Storm Fred will move around the western end of a subtropical high pressure over the Atlantic Ocean. The high will steer Fred toward the north-northeast during the next 36 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Fred will be over northern Georgia on Tuesday afternoon. Fred could be over West Virginia by Wednesday. Tropical Storm Fred will weaken steadily as it moves farther inland. However, Fred will move through a very moist environment and it will drop heavy rain over parts of the southeastern U.S. Rain will spread over western Georgia on Monday evening. Flash Flood Watches have been issued for parts of northwest Florida, southeast Alabama, western and northern Georgia, southeastern Tennessee and western North Carolina. Tropical Storm Fred could also cause sporadic power outages as it moves inland.

Elsewhere, Tropical Depression Grace was dropping heavy rain on parts of the Dominican Republic and Haiti, and former Tropical Depression Eight strengthened to Tropical Storm Henri southeast of Bermuda.

At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Depression Grace was located at latitude 17.9°N and longitude 72.4°W which put it about 50 miles (80 km) southeast of Port Au Prince, Haiti. Grace was moving toward the west-northwest at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1007 mb. Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the Cayman Islands and the Cuban provinces of Santiago de Cuba, Granma, Las Tunas and Camaguey. Tropical Storm Watches were in effect for the entire coast of Haiti and for Jamaica. Tropical Storm Watches were also in effect for the Cuban provinces of Ciego de Avila, Sancti Spiritus, Cinefuegos, Matanzas and Isla de la Juventud.

At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Storm Henri was located at latitude 31.0°N and longitude 62.9°W which put it about 145 miles (2305 km) southeast of Bermuda. Henri was moving toward the south-southwest at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1010 mb. A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for Bermuda.

Tropical Storm Elsa Moves over North Carolina

Tropical Storm Elsa moved over North Carolina on Thursday. At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Elsa was located at latitude 35.6°N and longitude 79.0°W which put it about 25 miles (40 km) west of Raleigh, North Carolina. Elsa was moving toward the northeast at 20 m.p.h. (32 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1007 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from South Santee River, South Carolina to Sandy Hook, New Jersey. The Tropical Storm Warning included Pamlico Sound and Albemarle Sound. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the eastern portion of Long Island from East Rockaway Inlet to Port Jefferson Harbor. A Tropical Storm Warning was also in effect for the portion of the coast from New Haven, Connecticut to Sagamore Beach, Massachusetts including Block Island, Nantucket, Martha’s Vineyard, and Cape Cod.

Tropical Storm Elsa moved a little more quickly toward the northeast on Thursday. The surface center of Elsa moved over North Carolina. The structure of Elsa exhibited the typical characteristics of a tropical storm moving northeast near the coast of the U.S. Heavy rain was falling in the northeastern part of Tropical Storm Elsa. The heaviest rain was falling on eastern North Carolina and eastern Virginia. Drier air was wrapping around the western and southern sides of Elsa. The strongest winds were blowing in the southeastern part of Tropical Storm Elsa that was over the Atlantic Ocean.

An upper level trough over the Great Lakes will steer Tropical Storm Elsa quickly toward the northeast during the next 36 hours. On its anticipated track Elsa will move over Virginia on Thursday evening. Tropical Storm Elsa could be near Long Island on Friday morning. Elsa could pass near Cape Cod later on Friday. Tropical Storm Elsa will make a transition to an extratropical cyclone when it moves farther north. Elsa will bring gusty winds and heavy rain to the East Coast of the U.S. from North Carolina to Massachusetts. Tropical Storm Elsa could cause sporadic power outages along the East Coast. Locally heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations.

Tropical Storm Elsa Prompts Warnings for East Coast

Tropical Storm Elsa prompted the issuance of warnings and watches for the East Coast of the U.S. on Wednesday night. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Elsa was located at latitude 32.1°N and longitude 82.3°W which put it about 55 miles (90 km) west of Savannah, Georgia. Elsa was moving toward the north-northeast at 16 m.p.h. (26 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 55 m.p.h. (90 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1006 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Altamaha Sound, Georgia to Great Egg Inlet, New Jersey. The Tropical Storm Warning included Pamlico Sound and Albemarle Sound. A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Great Egg Inlet to Sandy Hook, New Jersey. A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the eastern portion of Long Island from East Rockaway Inlet to Port Jefferson Harbor. A Tropical Storm Watch was also in effect for the portion of the coast from New Haven, Connecticut to Sagamore Beach, Massachusetts including Block Island, Nantucket, Martha’s Vineyard, and Cape Cod.

The center of Tropical Storm Elsa was moving across eastern Georgia on Wednesday night. Heavy rain was spreading across South Carolina. Rainbands on the eastern side of Elsa’s circulation were producing winds to tropical storm force over the Atlantic Ocean. NOAA buoy 41008 at Grays Reef reported a sustained wind speed of 38 m.p.h. (61 km/h) and a wind gust of 47 m.p.h. (76 km/h). The circulation around Tropical Storm Elsa was still well defined. A distinct low pressure system was evident on the surface map, radar and satellite displays. Storms on the eastern side of Elsa generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away to the northeast of the tropical storm.

An upper level trough over the Great Lakes will steer Tropical Storm Elsa toward the northeast during the next 48 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Elsa will move across South Carolina on Thursday morning and North Carolina on Thursday afternoon. Elsa could be over eastern Virginia on Thursday evening and near Long Island by Friday morning. Even though the center of Tropical Storm Elsa will be over land for another 18 to 24 hours, bands on the eastern side of the circulation could produce tropical storm force winds over the Atlantic Ocean and along the East Coast of the U.S. Elsa will also drop locally heavy rain over South Carolina, eastern North Carolina and eastern Virginia. Gusty winds and heavy rain could cause sporadic power outages. Heavy rain could also cause flash floods in some locations.

Tropical Storm Elsa Makes Landfall in Florida

Tropical Storm Elsa made landfall on the coast of north Florida on Wednesday morning. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Elsa was located at latitude 29.9°N and longitude 83.6°W which put it about 20 miles (30 km) southwest of Perry, Florida. Elsa was moving toward the north at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 999 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Aripeka to Ochlockonee River, Florida. A Tropical Storm Warning was also in effect for the portion of the coast from the Mouth of the St. Marys River, Florida to Little River Inlet, South Carolina. A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Little River Inlet, South Carolina to Sandy Hook New Jersey including Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds.

The center of Tropical Storm Elsa made landfall in Taylor County, Florida about 20 miles southwest of Perry around 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday. Elsa weakened from a hurricane to a strong tropical storm before it made landfall. Bands in the eastern half of the circulation around Tropical Storm Elsa dropped heavy rain over Florida. Rain was beginning to spread over southern Georgia. Gusty winds caused power outages in parts of Florida. Elsa caused a minor storm surge along the west coast of Florida.

Tropical Storm Elsa will weaken steadily during the next 48 hours while the center moves farther inland. Elsa will be steered toward the northeast during the next few days by an upper level trough over the Great Lakes. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Elsa will move over southern Georgia on Wednesday night. Elsa could be over South Carolina on Thursday morning and it could be over eastern Virginia by Thursday night. Elsa could strengthen back to a tropical storm if the center moves over the Atlantic Ocean later this week.

Tropical Storm Elsa will continue to drop locally heavy rain over northern Florida during the next few hours. Heavy rain will spread over southern Georgia, South Carolina, eastern North Carolina and eastern Virginia. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations. Gusty winds could cause sporadic power outages. There could be enough low level wind shear in stronger rainbands to produce tornadoes. When Tropical Storm Elsa gets closer to the East Coast of the U.S., southeasterly winds will blow water toward the coast. Those winds will cause water levels to rise along the coast

Claudette Strengthens Back to a Tropical Storm

Former Tropical Depression Claudette strengthened back to a tropical storm on Monday morning. At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Storm Claudette was located at latitude 36.4°N and longitude 76.3°W which put it about 15 miles (25 km) west of Duck, North Carolina. Claudette was moving toward the east-northeast at 28 m.p.h. (45 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1007 mb.

When the center of former Tropical Depression Claudette moved close to the coast of North Carolina, the sustained wind speed in bands in the part of the circulation over the Atlantic Ocean increased to tropical force. The National Hurricane Center upgraded the system to Tropical Storm Claudette on Monday morning. The distribution of thunderstorms and the wind field around Tropical Storm Claudette was asymmetrical. The strongest thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in bands on the eastern side of Claudette. Bands in the western side of the circulation consisted mainly of showers and lower clouds. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 140 miles (220 km) on the eastern side of Claudette.

Tropical Storm Claudette will move through an environment somewhat favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Claudette will move over an area where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 27°C. An upper level trough centered near the Great Lakes will produce southwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of Claudette. Those winds will cause moderate vertical wind shear and they will inhibit intensification. Tropical Storm Claudette could get a little stronger on Monday. Claudette will move over cooler water when it moves north of the Gulf Stream and it will make a transition to an extratropical cyclone.

The upper level trough over the Great Lakes will steer Tropical Storm Claudette quickly toward the northeast. On its anticipated track Claudette will move rapidly away from the East Coast of the U.S. Tropical Storm Claudette could pass south of Nova Scotia on Tuesday.

Tropical Depression Claudette Prompts Warning for North Carolina

Even though the center of circulation was well inland over the southeastern U.S. on Sunday morning, Tropical Depression Claudette prompted the issuance of a Tropical Storm Warning for the coast of North Carolina. At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Tropical Depression Claudette was located at latitude 33.7°N and longitude 84.8°W which put it about 25 miles (40 km) west of Atlanta, Georgia. Claudette was moving toward the east-northeast at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 30 m.p.h. (50 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1007 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the coast of North Carolina from Little River Inlet to Duck including Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds. A Tropical Storm Watch was issued for the portion of the coast from South Santee River, South Carolina to Little River Inlet, North Carolina.

Although the center of Tropical Depression Claudette had been over land for a day, the circulation was still well organized. A well defined center of lower pressure was evident at the surface. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were visible on satellite and radar images. The strongest winds were occurring in the bands that were over the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The winds were weaker over land. Rain was falling over the region from northern Florida to North Carolina. The heaviest rain was falling in a band over northern Florida and a Tornado Watch was in effect for part of that region.

Tropical Depression Claudette will move into an environment more favorable for intensification on Sunday. The center of Claudette will still be over land, but it will move east of the Appalachian Mountains. It will move between an upper level trough over the North Central U.S. and an upper level ridge southeast of the U.S. The trough and the ridge will produce southwesterly winds which will blow toward the top of the tropical depression. Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear, but they will also generate upper level divergence to the northeast of Tropical Depression Claudette. The upper level divergence could allow the surface pressure to decrease while Claudette is still over land. A decrease in pressure could generate enough additional force to increase the wind speeds along the coast of North Carolina and South Carolina, when the center Tropical Depression Claudette gets closer to the coast.

Tropical Depression Claudette will move north of a surface high pressure system centered southeast of the U.S. on Sunday. The high will steer Claudette toward the east-northeast during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Depression Claudette will move across Georgia and South Carolina on Sunday. Claudette will continue to drop heavy rain over parts of the southeastern U.S. Flash Flood Watches were in effect for northern Florida, northern Georgia, South Carolina, and eastern North Carolina. There could also be enough wind shear to generate tornadoes in bands on the eastern side of Tropical Depression Claudette.

Tropical Storm Claudette Brings Rain to Southeast U.S.

Tropical Storm Claudette brought wind and rain to the southeastern U.S. on Saturday morning. At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Claudette was located at latitude 30.4°N and longitude 90.1°W which put it about 30 miles (50 km) north of New Orleans, Louisiana. Tropical Storm Claudette was moving toward the north-northeast at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1006 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Morgan City, Louisiana to the Okaloosa/Walton County Line, Florida including New Orleans, Lake Pontchartrain and Lake Maurepas. The Tropical Storm Warning included Biloxi, Mississippi, Mobile, Alabama and Pensacola, Florida.

A well defined low level center of circulation formed in the system formerly called Potential Tropical Cyclone Three on Saturday morning and the National Hurricane Center classified the system as Tropical Storm Claudette. The strongest winds and heaviest rain were falling in bands north and east of the center of Claudette. Drier air was wrapping around the western and southern parts of Tropical Storm Claudette, Bands in those parts of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. The stronger winds were occurring in the portion of the circulation that was still over the Gulf of Mexico. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 200 miles (320 km) on the eastern side of Claudette. Winds on the western side of Claudette were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Claudette will move around the northwestern part of a high pressure system southeast of the U.S. The high pressure system will steer it toward the northeast during the next 36 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Claudette will move across southeastern Mississippi on Saturday and it could reach Alabama by Saturday night. Claudette will move across Georgia on Sunday and it could be over South Carolina by Sunday evening. Tropical Storm Claudette will drop locally heavy rain over parts of the southeastern U.S. Heavy rain could cause flash floods. Flash Flood Watches were in effect for parts of southeastern Mississippi, Alabama, northwestern Florida, and western Georgia. There may also be enough low level wind shear to produce tornadoes in the rainbands in the eastern side of the circulation.