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Tropical Depression Nicole Drops Heavy Rain over Southeast U.S.

Tropical Depression Nicole dropped heavy rain over parts of the southeastern U.S. on Friday morning. At 10:00 a.m. EST on Friday the center of Tropical Depression Nicole was located at latitude 34.2°N and longitude 84.3°W which put it about 35 miles (55 km) north of Atlanta, Georgia. Nicole was moving toward the north-northeast at 23 m.p.h. (37 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 30 m.p.h. (50 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1001 mb.

Tropical Storm Nicole dropped heavy rain over parts of the southeastern U.S. on Friday morning. Heavy rain was falling over eastern Tennessee and eastern Kentucky. Bands in the far eastern side of Nicole’s circulation contained thunderstorms that were dropping heavy rain over parts of eastern South Carolina, eastern North Carolina and southeastern Virginia. Easterly winds blowing around the northern side of Nicole’s circulation were enhancing convergence and rising motion ahead of a cold front moving toward the eastern U.S. The enhanced convergence and rising motion was contributing to rain that was falling in the region from Delaware to Ohio.

The cold front approaching the eastern U.S. and an upper level trough over the central U.S. will steer Tropical Depression Nicole quickly toward the north-northeast during Friday. On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Depression Nicole will be over West Virginia by Friday evening. Heavy rain falling over parts of the southeastern U.S. and Appalachians could cause flooding. Flood Watches were in effect for parts of northern South Carolina, western North Carolina and southern Virginia. There could be enough low level wind shear for tornadoes to develop in the bands on the far eastern side of the circulation around Tropical Depression Nicole. A Tornado Watch was in effect for eastern South Carolina, eastern North Carolina and southeastern Virginia.

Hurricane Ian Makes Landfall in South Carolina

Hurricane Ian made landfall in South Carolina on Friday afternoon. According to the National Hurricane Center the center of Hurricane Ian officially made landfall near Georgetown, South Carolina at 2:05 p.m. EDT on Friday. At 2:05 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Hurricane Ian was located at latitude 33.3°N and longitude 79.2°W which put it about 55 miles (90 km) east-southeast of Charleston, South Carolina. Ian was moving toward the north at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 977 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Savannah River, Georgia to Cape Fear, North Carolina. The Hurricane Warning included Charleston, South Carolina. A Hurricane Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Cape Fear to Surf City, North Carolina. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Cape Fear to Duck, North Carolina. The Tropical Storm Warning included Pamlico Sound. A Tropical Storm Warning is also in effect for the portion of the coast from Altamaha Sound to Savannah River, Georgia.

The center of Hurricane Ian moved over the coast of South Carolina near Georgetown at 2:05 p.m. EDT on Friday. Ian was a Category 1 hurricane at the time of landfall. Winds to hurricane force extended out70 miles (110 km) from the center of Ian’s circulation. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 275 miles (445 km) from the center of circulation. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) was 12.7. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 12.7 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 30.9. Hurricane Ian was capable of causing regional minor damage.

Hurricane Ian was bringing strong gusty winds to the coastal areas of South Carolina on Friday afternoon. The weather station at the Charleston airport (KCHS) reported a sustained wind speed of 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and a wind gust of 68 m.p.h. (101 m.p.h.). Heavy rain was also falling over Charleston and there were reports of flooded streets. Hurricane Ian was causing a storm surge east of Georgetown where the winds were blowing water toward the coast. A surge of 4 to 7 feet (1.2 to 2.1 meters) was possible in the part of the coast between Georgetown and Cape Fear, North Carolina. A Storm Surge Warning is in effect for the portion of the coast from the Savannah River, Georgia to Cape Fear, North Carolina. Winds and waves were causing erosion along the coast.

Hurricane Ian will weaken gradually as it moves inland over eastern South Carolina. The center of Ian will move over south central South Carolina during Friday night. Ian will produce strong gusty winds over South Carolina and eastern and central North Carolina. Gusts to tropical storm force could affect the area around Charlotte, North Carolina. Minor wind damage and widespread electricity outages could occur in those areas. Gusty winds could push over trees in locations where the ground is saturated. Heavy rain was already falling over South Carolina, eastern North Carolina,, and southeastern Virginia. Flood Watches were in effect for much of South Carolina, North Carolina and southeastern Virginia. Southerly winds will push water toward the coast in places east of Georgetown, South Carolina. The storm surge is likely to continue in those places for a few more hours.

Disturbance Drops Rain on Southeast U.S.

A disturbance designated as Invest 90L dropped rain over the southeast U.S. on Monday morning. At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Monday the center of the disturbance was located near latitude 32.7°N and longitude 86.7°W which put it about 30 miles (50 km) north-northwest of Montgomery, Alabama. The disturbance was moving toward the north-northeast at 23 m.p.h. (37 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 30 m.p.h. (50 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1011 mb.

A disturbance that formed over the Gulf of Mexico during the weekend moved quickly toward the north-northeast and it was located over the southeast U.S. on Monday morning. The center of the disturbance made landfall on the northern Gulf Coast on Sunday night near Pensacola, Florida. The disturbance was dropping locally heavy rain over parts of Alabama and western Georgia on Monday morning. The disturbance will move quickly toward the north-northeast and it will merge with a cold front over the southeastern U.S. Locally heavy rain will spread over eastern Tennessee, western South Carolina, western North Carolina, eastern Kentucky, western Virginia and West Virginia. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations.

Tropical Storm Elsa Moves over North Carolina

Tropical Storm Elsa moved over North Carolina on Thursday. At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Elsa was located at latitude 35.6°N and longitude 79.0°W which put it about 25 miles (40 km) west of Raleigh, North Carolina. Elsa was moving toward the northeast at 20 m.p.h. (32 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1007 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from South Santee River, South Carolina to Sandy Hook, New Jersey. The Tropical Storm Warning included Pamlico Sound and Albemarle Sound. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the eastern portion of Long Island from East Rockaway Inlet to Port Jefferson Harbor. A Tropical Storm Warning was also in effect for the portion of the coast from New Haven, Connecticut to Sagamore Beach, Massachusetts including Block Island, Nantucket, Martha’s Vineyard, and Cape Cod.

Tropical Storm Elsa moved a little more quickly toward the northeast on Thursday. The surface center of Elsa moved over North Carolina. The structure of Elsa exhibited the typical characteristics of a tropical storm moving northeast near the coast of the U.S. Heavy rain was falling in the northeastern part of Tropical Storm Elsa. The heaviest rain was falling on eastern North Carolina and eastern Virginia. Drier air was wrapping around the western and southern sides of Elsa. The strongest winds were blowing in the southeastern part of Tropical Storm Elsa that was over the Atlantic Ocean.

An upper level trough over the Great Lakes will steer Tropical Storm Elsa quickly toward the northeast during the next 36 hours. On its anticipated track Elsa will move over Virginia on Thursday evening. Tropical Storm Elsa could be near Long Island on Friday morning. Elsa could pass near Cape Cod later on Friday. Tropical Storm Elsa will make a transition to an extratropical cyclone when it moves farther north. Elsa will bring gusty winds and heavy rain to the East Coast of the U.S. from North Carolina to Massachusetts. Tropical Storm Elsa could cause sporadic power outages along the East Coast. Locally heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations.

Tropical Storm Elsa Prompts Warnings for East Coast

Tropical Storm Elsa prompted the issuance of warnings and watches for the East Coast of the U.S. on Wednesday night. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Elsa was located at latitude 32.1°N and longitude 82.3°W which put it about 55 miles (90 km) west of Savannah, Georgia. Elsa was moving toward the north-northeast at 16 m.p.h. (26 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 55 m.p.h. (90 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1006 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Altamaha Sound, Georgia to Great Egg Inlet, New Jersey. The Tropical Storm Warning included Pamlico Sound and Albemarle Sound. A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Great Egg Inlet to Sandy Hook, New Jersey. A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the eastern portion of Long Island from East Rockaway Inlet to Port Jefferson Harbor. A Tropical Storm Watch was also in effect for the portion of the coast from New Haven, Connecticut to Sagamore Beach, Massachusetts including Block Island, Nantucket, Martha’s Vineyard, and Cape Cod.

The center of Tropical Storm Elsa was moving across eastern Georgia on Wednesday night. Heavy rain was spreading across South Carolina. Rainbands on the eastern side of Elsa’s circulation were producing winds to tropical storm force over the Atlantic Ocean. NOAA buoy 41008 at Grays Reef reported a sustained wind speed of 38 m.p.h. (61 km/h) and a wind gust of 47 m.p.h. (76 km/h). The circulation around Tropical Storm Elsa was still well defined. A distinct low pressure system was evident on the surface map, radar and satellite displays. Storms on the eastern side of Elsa generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away to the northeast of the tropical storm.

An upper level trough over the Great Lakes will steer Tropical Storm Elsa toward the northeast during the next 48 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Elsa will move across South Carolina on Thursday morning and North Carolina on Thursday afternoon. Elsa could be over eastern Virginia on Thursday evening and near Long Island by Friday morning. Even though the center of Tropical Storm Elsa will be over land for another 18 to 24 hours, bands on the eastern side of the circulation could produce tropical storm force winds over the Atlantic Ocean and along the East Coast of the U.S. Elsa will also drop locally heavy rain over South Carolina, eastern North Carolina and eastern Virginia. Gusty winds and heavy rain could cause sporadic power outages. Heavy rain could also cause flash floods in some locations.

Tropical Storm Elsa Makes Landfall in Florida

Tropical Storm Elsa made landfall on the coast of north Florida on Wednesday morning. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Elsa was located at latitude 29.9°N and longitude 83.6°W which put it about 20 miles (30 km) southwest of Perry, Florida. Elsa was moving toward the north at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 999 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Aripeka to Ochlockonee River, Florida. A Tropical Storm Warning was also in effect for the portion of the coast from the Mouth of the St. Marys River, Florida to Little River Inlet, South Carolina. A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Little River Inlet, South Carolina to Sandy Hook New Jersey including Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds.

The center of Tropical Storm Elsa made landfall in Taylor County, Florida about 20 miles southwest of Perry around 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday. Elsa weakened from a hurricane to a strong tropical storm before it made landfall. Bands in the eastern half of the circulation around Tropical Storm Elsa dropped heavy rain over Florida. Rain was beginning to spread over southern Georgia. Gusty winds caused power outages in parts of Florida. Elsa caused a minor storm surge along the west coast of Florida.

Tropical Storm Elsa will weaken steadily during the next 48 hours while the center moves farther inland. Elsa will be steered toward the northeast during the next few days by an upper level trough over the Great Lakes. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Elsa will move over southern Georgia on Wednesday night. Elsa could be over South Carolina on Thursday morning and it could be over eastern Virginia by Thursday night. Elsa could strengthen back to a tropical storm if the center moves over the Atlantic Ocean later this week.

Tropical Storm Elsa will continue to drop locally heavy rain over northern Florida during the next few hours. Heavy rain will spread over southern Georgia, South Carolina, eastern North Carolina and eastern Virginia. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations. Gusty winds could cause sporadic power outages. There could be enough low level wind shear in stronger rainbands to produce tornadoes. When Tropical Storm Elsa gets closer to the East Coast of the U.S., southeasterly winds will blow water toward the coast. Those winds will cause water levels to rise along the coast

Hurricane Zeta Hits New Orleans

Hurricane Zeta hit New Orleans, Louisiana and the coast of Mississippi on Wednesday evening. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Hurricane Zeta was located at latitude 31.5°N and longitude 88.7°W which put it about 45 miles (75 km) northeast of Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Zeta was moving toward the northeast at 31 m.p.h. (50 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 978 mb.

A Hurricane Warning remained in effect for the portion of the coast from the Mouth of the Pearl River to the Mississippi/Alabama border. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from the Mississippi/Alabama border to the Walton/Bay County Line in Florida.

Hurricane Zeta made landfall on the coast of Louisiana near Grand Isle late on Wednesday afternoon. The eye of Zeta passed over New Orleans before moving northeast into southern Mississippi. The strongest winds in Hurricane Zeta occurred in the eastern half of the circulation. A NOAA National Ocean Service (NOS) station at Shell Beach Louisiana (SHBL1) reported a sustained wind speed of 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h) and a wind gust of 101 m.p.h. (163 km/h). A NOAA NOS station at the Bay Waveland Yacht Club, Mississippi (WYCM6) reported a wind speed of 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h) and a wind gust of 103 m.p.h. (167 km/h). The National Weather Service (NWS) office at the airport in New Orleans (KMSY) reported a Peak Wind of 71 m.p.h. (115 km/h). A station in Biloxi, Mississippi (KBIX) reported a sustained wind speed of 64 m.p.h. (104 km/h) and a wind gust of 87 m.p.h. (141 km/h). A station in Mobile, Alabama (KMOB) reported a sustained wind speed of 48 m.p.h. (78 km/h) and a wind gust of 91 m.p.h. (146 km/h).

There were reports of significant storm surges along the coast of Mississippi. There were also reports of widespread power outages in southeastern Louisiana and southern Mississippi.

Hurricane Zeta will move rapidly northeastward across Alabama during the night. The center of Zeta will be over northwestern Georgia by Thursday morning. Hurricane Zeta will weaken to a tropical storm during the night, but it will be capable of causing additional power outages. Zeta will also drop locally heavy rain. Flash Flood Watches were in effect for the area from Alabama to western Virginia. Zeta will eventually merge with a cold front and make a transition to an extratropical cyclone. The extratropical cyclone could contribute to snow that will fall over the northeastern U.S.

Teddy Brings Wind and Rain to Nova Scotia

Former Hurricane Teddy brought wind and rain to Nova Scotia on Wednesday.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Teddy was located at latitude 46.0°N and longitude 61.3°W which put it about 150 miles (240 km) southwest of Port aux Basques, Newfoundland.  Teddy was moving toward the north-northeast at 26 m.p.h. (43 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 967 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the south coast of Nova Scotia from Ecum Secum to Meat Cove.  A Tropical Storm Warning was also in effect for the portion of the coast from Port aux Basques to Francois, Newfoundland.  Tropical Storm Watches were in effect for the portion of the coast from Meat Cove to Brule, Nova Scotia, for the Magdalen Islands and for Prince Edward Island.

The center of former Hurricane Teddy made landfall near Ecum Secum, Nova Scotia on Wednesday morning.  The structure of Teddy made a transition from one typical of a tropical cyclone to one more like an extratropical cyclone as it approached the coast of Nova Scotia.  The area of stronger winds expanded.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 200 miles (320 km) from the center of Teddy.  The heaviest rain fell over eastern Nova Scotia.  The large circulation around Teddy was producing large waves which caused water level rises and beach erosion as far away as the East Coast of the U.S.

An upper level trough over eastern North America will steer Teddy quickly toward northeast during the rest of today.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Teddy will bring gusty winds and heavy rain to parts of southwestern Newfoundland during the next few hours.

Elswhere, former Tropical Storm Beta was dropping heavy rain over parts of Louisiana.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Depression Beta was located at latitude 30.2°N and longitude 94.2°W which put it about 60 miles (95 km) west of lake Charles, Louisiana.  Beta was moving toward the east-northeast at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 30 m.p.h. (50 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h_.  The minimum surface pressure was 1007 mb.

Tropical Depression Beta dropped heavy rain over southeastern Texas on Tuesday.  There were numerous reports of flooding around Houston.  Beta was moving over western Louisiana on Wednesday morning and light to moderate rain was falling over many parts of the state.  Flash Flood Watches were in effect for much of Louisiana and western Mississippi.  Beta will move slowly toward the northeast during the next 48 hours.  Moderate to heavy rain could spread over Mississippi, Tennessee, northern Alabama, western North Carolina and western Virginia.

Tropical Storm Isaias Speeds Past New York City

Tropical Storm Isaias sped past New York City on Tuesday afternoon.  At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Storm Isaias was located at latitude 40.9°N and longitude 75.1°W which put it about 65 miles (105 km) west of New York, New York.  Isaias was moving toward the north-northeast at 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 994 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Chincoteague, Virginia to Eastport, Maine including Long Island, Long Island Sound, Block Island, Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket.

Tropical Storm Isaias sped up the East Coast of the U.S. on Tuesday and the center of circulation was west of New York City by Tuesday afternoon.  Isaias was still generating an area of winds to tropical storm force over the Atlantic Ocean.  A NOAA buoy at the entrance to New York Harbor measured a sustained wind speed of 57 m.p.h. (83 km/h) and a wind gust of 71 m.p.h. (115 km/h).  JFK airport recently reported a wind gust to 70 m.p.h. (113 km/h).

The eastern side of former Hurricane Isaias produced strong wind gusts along the East Coast of the U.S. from North Carolina to Long Island.  A station at Federal Point, North Carolina reported a gust of 99 m.p.h.  (160 km/h).  Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina had a wind gust to 86 m.p.h. (139 km/h).  Stevensville, Maryland measured a gust of 79 m.p.h. (127 km/h).  South Norfolk, Virginia reported a wind gust to 76 m.p.h. (122 km/h) and Nags Head, North Carolina had a gust of 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h).  Ocean City, Maryland measured a gust of 69 m.p.h. (111 km/h).

The strong wind gusts caused widespread power outages.  Shear in the lower levels of the atmosphere also contributed to the spinup of a number of tornadoes.  Tropical Storm isaias dropped heavy rain over parts of the northeastern U.S.  Isaias will continue to speed north-northeastward into Canada during the next 12 hours.  Tropical Storm Isaias will gradually weaken and wind speeds should decrease.  Isaias will continue to drop locally heavy rain over eastern New York, western Massachusetts and Vermont for several more hours.  The potential for flash floods in those areas still exists.

Hurricane Isaias Brings Wind and Rain to MidAtlantic States

Hurricane Isaias brought wind and rain to the MidAtlantic states of the U.S. on Tuesday.  Isaias weakened to a tropical storm on Tuesday morning as it moved over eastern Virginia.  At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Storm Isaias was located at latitude 37.7°N and longitude 76.8°W which put it about 15 miles (25 km) south-southeast of Tappahannock, Virginia.  Isaias was moving toward the north-northeast at 33 m.p.h. (54 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 70 m.p.h. (110 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 993 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Surf City, North Carolina to Eastport, Maine including Albemarle Sound, Pamlico, Sound, Long Island, Long Island Sound, Block Island, Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket.

The center of Hurricane Isaias officially made landfall on the coast at Ocean Isle Beach, North Carolina.  The maximum sustained wind speed at the time of landfall was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h).  A weather station at Oak Island, North Carolina measured a sustained wind speed of 76 m.p.h. and a wind gust to 87 m.p.h. (140 km/h).

The center of Isaias moved rapidly toward the north-northeast during the overnight hours and it passed between Richmond and Norfolk, Virginia.  The strongest winds were occurring along the coast and over the Atlantic Ocean on Tuesday morning.  A weather station at Duck, North Carolina measured a sustained wind speed of 48 m.p.h. (78 km/h) and a wind gust of 63 m.p.h. (102 km/h).  A weather station at Poquoson, Virginia measured a sustained wind speed of 39 m.p.h. (63 km/h) and a wind gust to 56 m.p.h. (91 km/h).  A weather station on Third Island which is near the Mouth of Chesapeake Bay recently measured a sustained wind speed of 63 m.p.h. (101 km/h) and a wind gust of 77 m.p.h. (124 km/h).

Tropical Storm Isaias will move rapidly toward the north-northeast during the next 24 hours.  The center of Isaias will pass west of New York City later today.  Tropical Storm Isaias will gradually weaken, but it could bring tropical storm force winds to the northeastern U.S.  Wind shear in the lower levels of Tropical Storm Isaias’ circulation is contributing to the spin up of tornadoes.  Isaias will drop locally heavy rain and flash floods could occur.

Tropical Storm Isaias will take a track similar to the tracks taken by Hurricane Irene in 2011 and Hurricane Isabel in 2003.  Hurricane Irene was similar in strength and a little bit larger than Isaias when it hit North Carolina in 2011.  Irene was already weakening when it hit the coast while Isaias was strengthening at landfall.  According to the Tropical Cyclone Report on the National Hurricane Center’s (NHC) website, Hurricane Irene caused 15.8 billions dollars of damage in the U.S.

Hurricane Isabel was larger and stronger than Isaias was when it made landfall in North Carolina.  Isabel was also weakening at the time of landfall.  According to the Tropical Cyclone Report on NHC’s website for Hurricane Isabel, it caused 5.4 billion dollars of damage in the U.S.