Tag Archives: Nova Scotia

Tropical Cyclone Development Unlikely

The National Hurricane Center indicated on Monday that a strong extratropical cyclone over the Atlantic Ocean south of Nova Scotia is unlikely to make a transition to a tropical cyclone. At 1:00 p.m. EST on Monday the center of the extratropical cyclone was located at latitude 37.8°N and longitude 63.8°W which put it about 460 miles (745 km) south of Halifax, Nova Scotia. The extratropical cyclone was moving toward the north-northeast at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 986 mb.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) issued a special Tropical Weather Outlook on Monday morning for a strong extratropical cyclone over the Atlantic Ocean south of Nova Scotia. NHC indicated in the Tropical Weather Outlook that it was unlikely the extratropical cyclone would make a transition to a tropical cyclone or a subtropical cyclone. The extratropical cyclone was subsequently designated at Invest 90L.

A circular area of showers and thunderstorms developed at the center of a large, occluded extratropical cyclone south of Nova Scotia on Monday. A clear circular area was visible at the center of the area of showers and thunderstorms on satellite images. The clear area resembled the appearance of an eye in a tropical cyclone. The thunderstorms did not extend high into the troposphere because the center of the extratropical cyclone was over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 20˚C. The circular area of showers and thunderstorms in the middle of the extratropical cyclone was surrounded by a large area of cold, dry air. Bands of low clouds and showers were occurring in the cold, dry air. The extratropical cyclone was producing a large area of winds to tropical storm force.

The extratropical cyclone will move through an area that is only marginally favorable for a transition to a subtropical cyclone or a tropical cyclone. The extratropical cyclone will move over over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are colder than 20˚C. It will move under the eastern part of an upper level low south of Nova Scotia. The upper level low will produce southerly winds that will blow toward the top of the extatropical cyclone. However, the upper level low is almost stacked vertically with the surface low pressure systems. So, the winds at different levels of the atmosphere are similar and there will be little vertical wind shear. Cold, dry air will continue to surrounded the circular area of thunderstorms at the center of the extratropical cyclone. Cold Sea Surface Temperatures and cold, dry air around the area of thunderstorms will inhibit a transition to a subtropical cyclone. There is a slight chance the extratropical cyclone could make a transition to a subtropical cyclone during the next 24 hours before it moves over even colder water.

The upper level low will steer the extratropical cyclone toward the north during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track the extratropical cyclone could reach Nova Scotia on Tuesday. It will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to Nova Scotia.

Hurricane Fiona Nears Canadian Maritimes

Hurricane Fiona neared the Canadian Maritimes on Friday night. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Hurricane Fiona was located at latitude 44.5°N and longitude 60.8°W which put it about 140 miles (220 km) east of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Fiona was moving toward the north at 46 m.p.h. (74 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 105 m.p.h. (165 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 125 m.p.h. (200 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 933 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Hubbards to Brule, Nova Scotia. Hurricane Warnings were in effect for Prince Edward Islands and Isle de la Madeline. A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Parson’s Pond to Francois, Newfoundland. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for St. Andrews, New Brunswick to Hubbards, Nova Scotia. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Brule, Nova Scotia to Cap Madeline, Quebec. Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for Anticosti Island and for the portion of the coast from Sheldrake, Quebec to Parson’s Pond, Newfoundland. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Boat Harbor to Hare Bay, Newfoundland. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Francois to St. Lawrence, Newfoundland. A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Boat Harbor, Newfoundland to West Bay, Labrador.

Hurricane Fiona was making a rapid transition to a large, powerful extratropical cyclone on Friday night. The former eye and eyewall were no longer present at the center of Fiona. Most of the remaining thunderstorms were in bands northeast of the center of Fiona’s circulation. Cooler drier air was wrapping around the western and southern sides of the circulation. Upper level divergence above Hurricane Fiona was still pumping mass away and the surface pressure remained around 933 mb.

Hurricane Fiona grew much larger during the transition to an extratropical cyclone. Winds to hurricane force extended out 185 miles (295 km) from the center of Fiona’s circulation. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 345 miles (555 km) from the center of circulation. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Hurricane Fiona was 17.8. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 48.4 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 66.2. Hurricane Fiona was capable of causing extensive serious damage.

An upper level trough over eastern Canada will steer Hurricane Fiona quickly toward the north during the weekend. The strongest winds will occur over eastern Nova Scotia and western Newfoundland. Strong winds will also affect the rest of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island, parts of New Brunswick, Quebec and Labrador. The large circulation around Hurricane Fiona could cause widespread electrical outages. Locally heavy rain could cause floods in some places. Large waves and a storm surge could cause damage along the coast.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, Tropical Storm Gaston brought wind and rain to the Azores, Tropical Storm Hermine moved northeast of the Cabo Verde Islands and Tropical Storm Ian formed over the Caribbean Sea.

At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Gaston was located at latitude 38.9°N and longitude 29.5°W which put it about 50 miles (80 km) west-northwest of the Faial, Azores. Gaston was moving toward the southwest at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 999 mb.

Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for Corvo, Flores, Faial, Pico, Sao Jorge, Graciosa, and Terceira.

At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Hermine was located at latitude 19.4°N and longitude 20.8°W which put it about 315 miles (505 km) northeast of the Cabo Verde Islands. Hermine was moving toward the north at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb.

At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Ian was located at latitude 14.8°N and longitude 72.0°W which put it about 385 miles (625 km) southeast of Kingston, Jamaica. Ian was moving toward the west-northwest at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1005 mb.

Hurricane Watches were in effect for the Cayman Islands including Grand Cayman, Little Cayman and Cayman Brac. A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for Jamaica.

Hurricane Fiona Blows Past Bermuda

Hurricane Fiona blew past Bermuda on Thursday night. At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Friday the center of Hurricane Fiona was located at latitude 34.1°N and longitude 64.9°W which put it about 125 miles (200 km) north of Bermuda. Fiona was moving toward the north-northeast at 25 m.p.h. (40 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 125 m.p.h. (200 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 150 m.p.h. (240 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 936 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for Bermuda. A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Hubbards to Brule, Nova Scotia. Hurricane Warnings were in effect for Prince Edward Islands and Isle de la Madeline. A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Parson’s Pond to Francois, Newfoundland. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for St. Andrews, New Brunswick to Hubbards, Nova Scotia. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Brule, Nova Scotia to Cap Madeline, Quebec. Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for Anticosti Island and for the portion of the coast from Sheldrake, Quebec to Parson’s Pond, Newfoundland. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Boat Harbor to Hare Bay, Newfoundland. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Francois to St. Lawrence, Newfoundland. A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Boat Harbor, Newfoundland to West Bay, Labrador.

The center of Hurricane Fiona passed west of Bermuda on Thursday night. The L. F. Wade International Airport in Bermuda reported a sustained wind speed of 64 m.p.h. (103 km/h) and a wind gust of 83 m.p.h. (134 km/h). There were reports of stronger wind speeds measured by automated stations in higher locations in Bermuda.

Hurricane Fiona continued to be a large, well organized hurricane. A circular eye with a diameter of 35 miles (55 km) was at the center of Fiona’s circulation. The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms revolved around the core of Hurricane Fiona. Storms near the core generated strong upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the hurricane.

Hurricane Fiona grew into a large hurricane as it moved farther north on Thursday night. Winds to hurricane force extended out 90 miles (145 km) from the center of Fiona. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 345 miles (555 km) from the center of circulation. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) was 23.6. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 32.70 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 56.3. Hurricane Fiona was larger than Hurricane Jeanne was in 2004.

Hurricane Fiona will move through an environment that will become less favorable for a major hurricane during the next 24 hours. Fiona will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures colder than 26˚C. An upper level trough near the East Coast of the U.S. will produce southwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of Fiona’s circulation. Those winds will cause the vertical wind shear to increase. Hurricane Fiona will start to weaken gradually when the wind shear increase. A combination of colder Sea Surface Temperatures and moderate vertical wind shear will cause Hurricane Fiona to make a transition to a very strong extratropical cyclone.

The upper level trough near the East Coast of the U.S. will steer Fiona toward the north-northeast during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track, Hurricane Fiona will move away from Bermuda on Friday. Hurricane Fiona will approach the Canadian Maritimes on Friday night. Fiona will bring strong, destructive winds to the Canadian Maritimes. Heavy rain could cause floods in some locations.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, Tropical Storm Gaston was bringing wind and rain to the Azores and Tropical Depression Nine formed over the southeastern Caribbean Sea. Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for Corvo, Flores, Faial, Pico, Sao Jorge, Graciosa, and Terceira. At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Gaston was located at latitude 40.5°N and longitude 29.2°W which put it about 135 miles (215 km) north-northwest of the Faial. Gaston was moving toward the east-southeast at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 999 mb.

At 5:00 a.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Depression Nine was located at latitude 13.9°N and longitude 68.6°W which put it about 615 miles (985 km) east-southeast of Kingston, Jamaica. The tropical depression was moving toward the west-northwest at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1006 mb. Tropical Depression Nine is forecast to intensify to a hurricane over the northwestern Caribbean Sea during the weekend. It could move over the southeastern Gulf of Mexico early next week.

Tropical Depression 16 Forms East of Northern Leeward Islands

Tropical Depression Sixteen formed east of the Northern Leeward Islands on Saturday night. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Depression Sixteen was located at latitude 16.4°N and longitude 53.1°W which put it about 670 miles (1080 km) east of the Northern Leeward Islands. The tropical depression was moving toward the west-northwest at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were’ wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1008 mb.

More thunderstorms developed near the center of a low pressure system east of the Northern Leeward Islands on Saturday night and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Depression Sixteen. Thunderstorms were also developing in bands in the eastern and northern parts of the tropical depression. Bands in the southern and western parts of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. Storms near the center of circulation generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away to the north of the tropical depression.

Tropical Depression Sixteen will move through an environment somewhat favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. The depression will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. It will move under the western part of an upper level ridge. The ridge will produce southerly winds that will blow toward the top of the tropical depression. Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear, but the shear will not be strong enough to prevent intensification. Tropical Depression Sixteen is likely to strengthen to a tropical storm on Sunday. The tropical depression will move closer to an upper level trough northeast of Puerto Rico on Monday. The upper level trough will produce strong southwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of the tropical depression. Those winds will cause moderate vertical wind shear, which is likely to weaken the tropical depression.

Tropical Depression Sixteen will move around the southern side of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean. The high pressure system will steer the depression toward the west-northwest during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Depression Sixteen could be northeast of the Northern Leeward Islands by Monday morning.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, Tropical Storm Odette made a transition to an extratropical cyclone south of Nova Scotia. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of former Tropical Storm Odette was located at latitude 39.1°N and longitude 65.1°W which put it about 385 miles (625 km) south-southwest of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Odette was moving toward the east-northeast at 18 m.p.h. (29 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were’ wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1001 mb.

Claudette Strengthens Back to a Tropical Storm

Former Tropical Depression Claudette strengthened back to a tropical storm on Monday morning. At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Storm Claudette was located at latitude 36.4°N and longitude 76.3°W which put it about 15 miles (25 km) west of Duck, North Carolina. Claudette was moving toward the east-northeast at 28 m.p.h. (45 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1007 mb.

When the center of former Tropical Depression Claudette moved close to the coast of North Carolina, the sustained wind speed in bands in the part of the circulation over the Atlantic Ocean increased to tropical force. The National Hurricane Center upgraded the system to Tropical Storm Claudette on Monday morning. The distribution of thunderstorms and the wind field around Tropical Storm Claudette was asymmetrical. The strongest thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in bands on the eastern side of Claudette. Bands in the western side of the circulation consisted mainly of showers and lower clouds. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 140 miles (220 km) on the eastern side of Claudette.

Tropical Storm Claudette will move through an environment somewhat favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Claudette will move over an area where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 27°C. An upper level trough centered near the Great Lakes will produce southwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of Claudette. Those winds will cause moderate vertical wind shear and they will inhibit intensification. Tropical Storm Claudette could get a little stronger on Monday. Claudette will move over cooler water when it moves north of the Gulf Stream and it will make a transition to an extratropical cyclone.

The upper level trough over the Great Lakes will steer Tropical Storm Claudette quickly toward the northeast. On its anticipated track Claudette will move rapidly away from the East Coast of the U.S. Tropical Storm Claudette could pass south of Nova Scotia on Tuesday.

Tropical Depression Two Strengthens to Tropical Storm Bill

Former Tropical Depression Two strengthened to Tropical Storm Bill east-northeast of Cape Hatteras on Monday night. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Storm Bill was located at latitude 36.7°N and longitude 69.8°W which put it about 335 miles (540 km) east-northeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Bill was moving toward the northeast at 23 m.p.h. (37 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1003 mb.

The circulation around former Tropical Depression Two intensified on Monday night and the National Hurricane Center upgraded the system to Tropical Storm Bill. Even though the circulation around Bill was stronger, the distribution of thunderstorms was asymmetrical. The strongest thunderstorms were occurring in bands on the eastern side of Tropical Storm Bill. Bands on the western side of Bill consisted mainly of showers and lower clouds. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 70 miles (110 km) in the southeastern quadrant of Tropical Storm Bill. The wind was blowing at less than tropical storm force in the other quadrants of Bill. An upper level trough east of the Great Lakes was producing strong southwesterly winds that were blowing toward the top of Tropical Storm Bill. Those winds were causing moderate vertical wind shear and they were the cause of the asymmetrical distribution of thunderstorms.

Tropical Storm Bill will move through an environment that will be only marginally favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Bill will move over the warmer water in the Gulf Stream where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 27°C on Tuesday. However, the upper level trough east of the Great Lakes will continue to cause moderate vertical wind shear, which will inhibit intensification. Tropical Storm Bill could intensify a little more on Tuesday, but the wind shear is likely to increase by Tuesday night.

The upper level trough east of the Great Lakes will steer Tropical Storm Bill rapidly toward the northeast. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Bill will pass southeast of Nova Scotia on Tuesday. Bill could approach southeast Newfoundland on Tuesday night.

Tropical Depression Two Forms East of Cape Hatteras

Tropical Depression Two formed east of Cape Hatteras on Monday morning. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Depression Two was located at latitude 35.0°N and longitude 73.7°W which put it about 105 miles (165 km) east of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. The tropical depression was moving toward the northeast at 21 m.p.h. (33 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1006 mb.

More thunderstorms developed near the center of a low pressure system east of North Carolina on Monday morning and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Depression Two. Bands of showers and thunderstorms also developed and the bands began to revolve around the center of the depression. Storms near the center of circulation generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the tropical depression. The removal of mass cause the surface pressure to decrease.

Tropical Depression Two will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. The tropical depression will move over the warmer water of the Gulf Stream where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 27°C. An upper level trough east of the Great Lakes will produce southwesterly winds which will blow toward the top of the depression. Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear, but the shear will not be strong enough to prevent intensification. Tropical Depression Two will likely strengthen to a tropical storm during the next 12 hours.

The upper level trough east of the Great Lakes will steer Tropical Depression Two rapidly toward the northeast. On its anticipated track Tropical Depression Two will move away from the U.S. It could pass southeast of Nova Scotia on Tuesday.

Hurricane Epsilon Passes East of Bermuda

Hurricane Epsilon passed east of Bermuda on Thursday night. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Hurricane Epsilon was located at latitude 32.6°N and longitude 61.6°W which put it about 300 miles (485 km) east of Bermuda. Epsilon was moving toward the north-northwest at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 968 mb. The government of Bermuda discontinued the Tropical Storm Warning.

Hurricane Epsilon weakened as it passed east of Bermuda on Thursday night. The eye was no longer apparent on satellite images. Breaks developed in the ring of thunderstorms around the eye. Bands of showers and thunderstorms continued to revolve around the core of Hurricane Epsilon. Storms near the core still generated upper level divergence which pumped mass away to the east of Epsilon. Winds to hurricane force extended out 20 miles (30 km) from the center of circulation. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 240 miles (390 km) from the center.

Hurricane Epsilon will move through an environment that could allow it to maintain its intensity for another 24 to 36 hours.  Epsilon will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 26°C.  It will be in an area where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Upper level westerly winds in the middle latitude will create more vertical wind shear on Saturday. The wind shear will cause Epsilon to start to weaken and it will begin a transition to an extratropical cyclone.

Hurricane Epsilon will move around the southwestern part of ridge of high pressure over the Northeastern Atlantic Ocean.  The ridge will steer Epsilon toward the north during the next 24 hours.  Epsilon will move more toward the northeast during the weekend when it reaches the westerly winds in the middle latitudes. On its anticipated track Hurricane Epsilon will pass southeast of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland during the weekend.

Teddy Brings Wind and Rain to Nova Scotia

Former Hurricane Teddy brought wind and rain to Nova Scotia on Wednesday.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Teddy was located at latitude 46.0°N and longitude 61.3°W which put it about 150 miles (240 km) southwest of Port aux Basques, Newfoundland.  Teddy was moving toward the north-northeast at 26 m.p.h. (43 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 967 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the south coast of Nova Scotia from Ecum Secum to Meat Cove.  A Tropical Storm Warning was also in effect for the portion of the coast from Port aux Basques to Francois, Newfoundland.  Tropical Storm Watches were in effect for the portion of the coast from Meat Cove to Brule, Nova Scotia, for the Magdalen Islands and for Prince Edward Island.

The center of former Hurricane Teddy made landfall near Ecum Secum, Nova Scotia on Wednesday morning.  The structure of Teddy made a transition from one typical of a tropical cyclone to one more like an extratropical cyclone as it approached the coast of Nova Scotia.  The area of stronger winds expanded.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 200 miles (320 km) from the center of Teddy.  The heaviest rain fell over eastern Nova Scotia.  The large circulation around Teddy was producing large waves which caused water level rises and beach erosion as far away as the East Coast of the U.S.

An upper level trough over eastern North America will steer Teddy quickly toward northeast during the rest of today.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Teddy will bring gusty winds and heavy rain to parts of southwestern Newfoundland during the next few hours.

Elswhere, former Tropical Storm Beta was dropping heavy rain over parts of Louisiana.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Depression Beta was located at latitude 30.2°N and longitude 94.2°W which put it about 60 miles (95 km) west of lake Charles, Louisiana.  Beta was moving toward the east-northeast at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 30 m.p.h. (50 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h_.  The minimum surface pressure was 1007 mb.

Tropical Depression Beta dropped heavy rain over southeastern Texas on Tuesday.  There were numerous reports of flooding around Houston.  Beta was moving over western Louisiana on Wednesday morning and light to moderate rain was falling over many parts of the state.  Flash Flood Watches were in effect for much of Louisiana and western Mississippi.  Beta will move slowly toward the northeast during the next 48 hours.  Moderate to heavy rain could spread over Mississippi, Tennessee, northern Alabama, western North Carolina and western Virginia.

Hurricane Teddy Heads for Nova Scotia, Beta Reaches Texas

Hurricane Teddy headed for Nova Scotia on Monday night as Tropical Storm Beta reached the coast of Texas.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Hurricane Teddy was located at latitude 35.6°N and longitude 61.5°W which put it about 630 miles (1015 km) south of Halifax, Nova Scotia.  Teddy was moving toward the north at 25 m.p.h. (41 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 120 m.p.h. (195 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 956 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the south coast of Nova Scotia from Digby to Meat Cove.  Tropical Storm Watches were in effect for the portions of the coast from Meat Cove to Tidnish and from Digby to Fort Lawrence.  Tropical Storm Watches were also in effect for Prince Edward Island, the Magdalen Islands and from Port aux Basques to Francois, Newfoundland.

The circulation around Hurricane Teddy expanded as it began a transition to an extratropical cyclone.  Winds to hurricane force extended out 100 miles (160 km) from the center of Teddy.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 275 miles (445 km) from the center.  Drier air was wrapping around the southern side of Hurricane Teddy.  The strongest thunderstorms were in bands in the northern half of the hurricane.  Bands in the southern half of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.

An upper level trough over eastern North America will cause strong southerly winds which will blow toward the top of Hurricane Teddy.  Those winds will cause strong vertical wind shear and they will contribute to the extratropical transition of Teddy.  Hurricane Teddy will move over much cooler water when it approaches Nova Scotia.  Teddy will transform into a strong extratropical cyclone.

Hurricane Teddy will be steered rapidly toward the north by the upper level trough over eastern North America.  On its anticipated track Hurricane Teddy will approach Nova Scotia on Tuesday night.  Teddy will bring strong winds and heavy rain to Nova Scotia and southwestern Newfoundland.

Elsewhere, slow moving Tropical Storm Beta reached the coast of Texas on Monday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Storm Beta was located at latitude 28.4°N and longitude 96.3°W which put it about 5 miles (10 km) east of Port O Connor, Texas.  Beta was moving toward the northwest at 3 m.p.h. (5 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 999 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Port Aransas, Texas to Morgan City Louisiana.

Tropical Storm Beta weakened gradually on Monday as it moved slowly toward the coast of Texas.  Drier air continued to get pulled into the circulation which limited the development of new thunderstorms.  Without updrafts and downdrafts to transport momentum vertically, the circulation around Beta slowly spun down.

Even though Tropical Storm Beta weakened on Monday, its winds pushed water toward the coast of Texas.  Water levels rose along the coast and there were some reports of damage.  Waves contributed to beach erosion.  Moderate rain was falling over the region between Houston and Victoria, Texas.  The rain could cause flooding in some locations.

Tropical Storm Beta was forecast to move slowly toward the northeast along the coast of Texas during the next 24 to 36 hours.  Beta will continue to weaken, but winds will blow water toward the coast from several more days.  Locally heavy rain will continue to create a risk of floods until Tropical Storm Beta moves away from the area.