Tag Archives: Western Australia

Tropical Cyclone Lincoln Drops Rain on Western Australia

Tropical Cyclone Lincoln dropped rain on parts of Western Australia on Saturday. At 4:00 a.m. EST on Saturday the center of Tropical Cyclone Lincoln was located at latitude 22.8°S and longitude 113.3°E which put it about 65 miles (105 km) west of Learmonth, Australia. Lincoln was moving toward the south at 14 m.p.h. (22km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1001 mb.

Tropical Cyclone Lincoln weakened as it approached the coast of Western Australia on Saturday. An upper level trough over the South Indian Ocean west of Australia produced strong northwesterly winds that blew across the top of Lincoln’s circulation. Those winds caused strong vertical wind shear. The strong wind shear caused the distribution of thunderstorms in Tropical Cyclone Lincoln to be asymmetrical. Thunderstorms were occurring in bands in the southern half of Lincoln’s circulation. Bands in the northern half of Tropical Cyclone Lincoln consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.

Tropical Cyclone Lincoln will move around the western side of a high pressure system over Australia. The high pressure system will steer Lincoln toward the south-southeast during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track, Tropical Cyclone Lincoln will move farther inland near the coast of Western Australia.

Tropical Cyclone Lincoln will weaken while it moves inland over Western Australia. Lincoln will drop heavy rain over parts of Western Australia as it move farther inland. Heavy rain could cause floods in some locations. Flood Watches are in effect for the Pilbara Coast and the Gascoyne Coast river catchments. A Flood Watch is also in effect for the Central West District river catchments.

Tropical Cyclone Lincoln Moves Toward Western Australia

Tropical Cyclone Lincoln moved toward the coast of Western Australia on Friday. At 4:00 p.m. EST on Friday the center of Tropical Cyclone Lincoln was located at latitude 20.0°S and longitude 113.3°E which put it about 200 miles (320 km) north of Exmouth, Australia. Lincoln was moving toward the south-southwest at 5 m.p.h. (8 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 999 mb.

A Warning was in effect for the coast of Western Australia from Giralia to Cape Cuvier. The Warning included Exmouth, Ningaloo, and Coral Bay.

Tropical Cyclone Lincoln maintained its intensity on Friday, but the distribution of thunderstorms was asymmetrical. Thunderstorms were occurring mainly in bands in the western half of Lincoln’s circulation. Bands in the eastern half of Tropical Cyclone Lincoln consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. Storms near the center of Lincoln’s circulation generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away to the south of the tropical cyclone. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 50 miles (80 km) from the center of Tropical Cyclone Lincoln.

Tropical Cyclone Lincoln will move through an environment marginally favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Lincoln will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28°C. However, an upper level trough over the South Indian Ocean west of Australia will produce northwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of Lincoln’s circulation. Those winds will cause moderate vertical wind shear. The wind shear will inhibit intensification, but Tropical Cyclone Lincoln could maintain its intensity during the next 24 hours.

The upper level trough west of Australia will steer Tropical Cyclone Lincoln toward the south during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track, Tropical Cyclone Lincoln will approach the coast of Western Australia between Exmouth and Cape Cuvier in 24 hours. Lincoln will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to Western Australia. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations.

Tropical Cyclone Eleanor Weakens South of Mauritius

Tropical Cyclone Eleanor weakened south of Mauritius on Friday. At 10:00 a.m. EST on Friday the center of Tropical Cyclone Eleanor was located at latitude 23.9°S and longitude 58.4°E which put it about 265 miles (430 km) south-southeast of Port Louis, Mauritius. Eleanor was moving toward the south at 5 m.p.h. (8 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 995 mb.

An upper level trough southeast of Madagascar produced strong northwesterly winds that blew across the top of Tropical Cyclone Eleanor. Those winds caused strong vertical wind shear. The strong upper level winds also blew the upper part pf Eleanor’s circulation to the southeast of the circulation in the lower levels of the atmosphere. Bands revolving around the center of Tropical Cyclone Eleanor consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. A few thunderstorms were still occurring in bands in the southeastern periphery of Eleanor’s circulation. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 140 miles (225 km) from the center of Tropical Cyclone Eleanor.

Tropical Cyclone Eleanor will move through an environment unfavorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. Eleanor will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 27°C. However, the upper level trough south of Madagascar will continue to cause strong vertical wind shear. The strong wind shear will cause Tropical Cyclone Eleanor to continue to weaken during the next 36 hours.

Since the circulation around Tropical Cyclone Eleanor exists in the lower levels of the atmosphere, it will be steered by winds in those levels. Eleanor will move around the northern side of a high pressure system over the South Indian Ocean. The high pressure system will steer Eleanor toward the west. On its anticipated track, Tropical Cyclone Eleanor will move south of Mauritius and La Reunion during the next 36 hours.

Elsewhere over the South Indian Ocean, Tropical Cyclone Lincoln continued to spin near the coast of Western Australia. At 10:00 a.m. EST on Friday the center of Tropical Cyclone Lincoln was located at latitude 19.3°S and longitude 113.5°E which put it about 245 miles (395 km) north of Exmouth, Australia. Lincoln was moving toward the southwest at 5 m.p.h. (8 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 999 mb. A Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Onslow to Wooramel Roadhouse, Australia. The Warning included Exmouth and Carnarvon.

Tropical Cyclone Lincoln Prompts Warning for Western Australia

The potential risk posed by Tropical Cyclone Lincoln prompted the Australian Bureau of Meteorology to issue a Warning for a portion of the coast of Western Australia on Thursday. At 10:00 a.m. EST on Thursday the center of Tropical Cyclone Lincoln was located at latitude 17.8°S and longitude 117.7°E which put it about 175 miles (280 km) north of Port Hedland, Australia. Lincoln was moving toward the southwest at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 992 mb.

A Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Mardie to Ningaloo, Australia. The Warning included Exmouth and Onslow. A Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Ningaloo to Wooramel Roadhouse, Australia. The Watch included Carnarvon.

Tropical Cyclone Lincoln was strengthening gradually as it moved over the South Indian Ocean near Western Australia on Thursday. Even though Lincoln was strengthening, the distribution of thunderstorms was asymmetrical. Thunderstorms were occurring in bands in the northern and western parts of Tropical Cyclone Lincoln. Bands in the southern and eastern parts of Lincoln’s circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. An upper level ridge over Australia was producing northeasterly winds that were blowing toward the top of Tropical Cyclone Lincoln. Those winds were causing moderate vertical wind shear and the wind shear was causing the asymmetrical distribution of thunderstorms. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 85 miles (135 km) from the center of Lincoln’s circulation.

Tropical Cyclone Lincoln will move through an environment somewhat favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Lincoln will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28°C. However, the upper level ridge over Australia will continue to cause vertical wind shear. The wind shear will inhibit intensification, but the shear may not be enough to prevent intensification. Tropical Cyclone Eleanor is likely to strengthen gradually during the next 24 hours.

Tropical Cyclone Lincoln will move around the northwestern part of a high pressure system over Australia. The high pressure system will steer Lincoln toward the southwest during the next 24 hours. Lincoln will move more toward the south when it reaches the western end of the high pressure system on Friday. Tropical Cyclone Lincoln could approach the coast of Western Australia between Mardie and Caranarvon in 36 hours.

Tropical Cyclone Eleanor Churns North-northeast of Mauritius

Tropical Cyclone Eleanor was churning over the South Indian Ocean north-northeast of Mauritius on Tuesday night. At 10:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday the center of Tropical Cyclone Eleanor was located at latitude 15.2°S and longitude 60.6°E which put it about 425 miles (685 km) north-northeast of Port Louis, Mauritius. Eleanor was moving toward the south-southeast at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 993 mb.

Tropical Cyclone Eleanor strengthened gradually on Tuesday as it churned over the South Indian Ocean north-northeast of Mauritius. More thunderstorms developed near the center of Eleanor’s circulation Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the center of Tropical Cyclone Eleanor. Storms near the center of circulation generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the tropical cyclone. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 90 miles (145 km km) from the center of Tropical Cyclone Eleanor.

Tropical Cyclone Eleanor will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. Eleanor will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29°C. It will move under the axis of an upper level ridge over the South Indian Ocean. The upper level winds are weak near the axis of the ridge and there will be little vertical wind shear. Tropical Cyclone Eleanor will intensify during the next 36 hours. Eleanor could strengthen to the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon.

Tropical Cyclone Eleanor will move around the western end of a high pressure system over the South Indian Ocean. The high pressure system will steer Eleanor toward the south during the next 36 hours. On its anticipated track, Tropical Cyclone Eleanor will be northeast of Mauritius in 24 hours. Eleanor could be the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon when it is northeast of Mauritius.

Elsewhere, former Tropical Cyclone Lincoln moved across northern Australia toward the coast of Western Australia. At 7:00 p.m. EST on Tuesday the center of former Tropical Cyclone Lincoln was located at latitude 15.9°S and longitude 124.6°E which put it about 65 miles (105 km) east-northeast of Cockatoo Island. Lincoln was moving toward the west-northwest at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 25 m.p.h. (40 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1004 mb.

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology issued a Watch for the portion of the coast from Roebourne to Ningaloo. The Watch included Karratha, Dampier, Onslow and Exmouth.

Tropical Cyclone Ilsa Brings Wind and Rain to Western Australia

Tropical Cyclone Ilsa continued to bring wind and rain to Western Australia on Friday morning. At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Cyclone Ilsa was located at latitude 22.4°S and longitude 125.0°E which put it about 180 miles (290 km) west of Kiwirrkurra, Australia. Ilsa was moving toward the east-southeast at 24 m.p.h. (39 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 994 mb.

Tropical Cyclone Isla continued to bring wind and rain to Western Australia after it made landfall on the coast near Pardoo Roadhouse on Thursday. Reports of the effects of Ilsa included pictures of damage to the Pardoo Roadhouse. A weather station in Telfer measured a sustained wind speed of 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) when Tropical Cyclone Ilsa passed near it. The weather station also measured a wind gust of 77 m.p.h. (124 km/h) and it recorded 2.00 inches (51.0 mm) of rain. A weather station in Marble Bar measured 2.47 inches (62.8 mm) of rain dropped by Tropical Storm Ilsa.

A Minor Flood Warning was in effect for the De Grey River. A Flood Warning was in effect for the Sandy Desert. Flood Watches were in effect for Warburton District Rivers, Salt Lake District Rivers and the Western Desert.

The circulation around Tropical Cyclone Ilsa was still well defined on Friday morning even though it had been weakening over land for almost 24 hours. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the center of Ilsa’s circulation. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 60 miles (95 km) in the northern side of Tropical Cyclone Ilsa.

Tropical Cyclone Ilsa will move around the southern side of a high pressure system over northern Australia. The high pressure system will steer Ilsa quickly toward the east-southeast during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Cyclone Ilsa will pass near Kiwirrkurra and Alice Springs.

Tropical Cyclone Ilsa will continue to weaken as it moves over land. Ilsa will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to parts of Western Australia and the Northern Territory during the next 24 hours.

Tropical Cyclone Ilsa Hits Western Australia

The center of Tropical Cyclone Ilsa hit the coast of Western Australia just to the east of Pardoo Roadhouse on Thursday. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Cyclone Ilsa was located at latitude 19.9°S and longitude 119.7°E which put it about 10 miles (15 km) northeast of Pardoo Roadhouse, Australia. Ilsa was moving toward the southeast at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 150 m.p.h. (240 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 185 m.p.h. (295 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 926 mb.

A Tropical Cyclone Warning was in effect for the coast of Western Australia from Bidyadanga to Port Hedland. The Tropical Cyclone Warning extended inland to include De Grey, Marble Bar, Nullagine, Telfer, Parnngurr and Kunawarritji.

Tropical Cyclone Ilsa was the equivalent of a Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale at the time of landfall. A very small circular eye was present at the center of Ilsa’s circulation. The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Tropical Cyclone Ilsa. Storms near the core generated strong upper level divergence that pumped large quantities of mass away from the tropical cyclone.

A weather station at Bedout Island measured a sustained wind speed of 135 m.p.h. (218 km/h) when the western side of the eyewall of Tropical Cyclone Ilsa passed over it. The weather station also measured a wind gust of 178 m.p.h. (288 km/h).

Winds to hurricane/typhoon force extended out 45 miles (75 km) from the center of Tropical Cyclone Ilsa at the time of landfall. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 140 miles (225 km) from the center. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Tropical Cyclone Ilsa was 31.6. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 17.6 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 49.2. Tropical Cyclone Ilsa was similar in size and intensity to Hurricane Laura when Laura hit southwest Louisiana in 2020.

Tropical Cyclone Ilsa will move around the southern side of a high pressure system over northern Australia. The high pressure system will steer Ilsa toward the east-southeast during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track, the center of Tropical Cyclone Ilsa will pass near Telfer and Kiwirrkurra.

Although Tropical Cyclone Ilsa will weaken as it moves farther inland over Western Australia, it will take a while to spin down. Ilsa will bring strong winds and locally heavy rain to Western Australia. The strong winds will be capable of causing regional severe damage. Ilsa could also produce strong winds in De Grey and Telfer when it moves inland. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations. Flood Warnings are in effect for the De Grey River and the Sandy Desert. Flood Watches are in effect for the West Kimberley, Western Desert, Warburton and Salt Lake Districts. Tropical Cyclone Ilsa could bring gusty winds to Kiwirrkurra during Friday.

Powerful Tropical Cyclone Ilsa Nears Western Australia

Powerful Tropical Cyclone Ilsa neared the coast of Western Australia on Thursday morning. At 5:00 a.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Cyclone Ilsa was located at latitude 19.1°S and longitude 119.1°E which put it about 75 miles (120 km) northwest of Pardoo Roadhouse, Australia. Ilsa was moving toward the south-southeast at 11 m.p.h. (17 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 150 m.p.h. (240 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 185 m.p.h. (295 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 926 mb.

A Tropical Cyclone Warning was in effect for the coast of Western Australia from Bidyadanga to Whim Creek. The Warning included Port Hedland. The Tropical Cyclone Warning extended inland to include De Grey, Marble Bar, Nullagine, Telfer and Parnngurr.

Tropical Cyclone Ilsa continued to intensify during Wednesday night, as it moved closer to the coast of Western Australia. A very small circular eye was present at the center of Ilsa’s circulation. The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Tropical Cyclone Ilsa. Storms near the core generated strong upper level divergence that pumped large quantities of mass away from the tropical cyclone. The removal of large quantities of mass was causing the surface pressure to continue to decrease.

A weather station at Bedout Island measured a sustained wind speed of 120 m.p.h. (104 kt or 193 km/h) as the core of Tropical Cyclone Ilsa was approaching it. The weather station also measured a wind gust of 144 m.p.h. (125 kt or 232 km/h).

The size of the circulation around Tropical Cyclone Ilsa increased as it intensified. Winds to hurricane/typhoon force extended out 50 miles (80 km) from the center of Tropical Cyclone Ilsa. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 140 miles (225 km) from the center. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Tropical Cyclone Ilsa was 31.6. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 18.4 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 50.0. Tropical Cyclone Ilsa was similar in size and intensity to Hurricane Laura when Laura hit southwest Louisiana in 2020.

Tropical Cyclone Ilsa will move through an environment favorable for a powerful tropical cyclone during the next few hours. Ilsa will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 30˚C. It will move under the axis of an upper level ridge that extends from northern Australia to the South Indian Ocean. The upper level winds are weak near the axis of the ridge and there will be little vertical wind shear. Tropical Cyclone Ilsa is likely to maintain its intensity until it reaches the coast of Western Australia.

Tropical Cyclone Ilsa will move around the western end of a high pressure system over western Australia. The high pressure system will steer Ilsa toward the southeast during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track, the center of Tropical Cyclone Ilsa is likely to make landfall on the coast of Western Australia near Pardoo Roadhouse in 6 hours. Ilsa will be the equivalent of a major hurricane when it makes landfall.

Tropical Cyclone Ilsa will bring very strong winds and locally heavy rain to Western Australia between De Grey and Wallal Downs. The strong winds will be capable of causing regional severe damage. Ilsa could also produce strong winds in De Grey and Telfer when it moves inland. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations. Flood Warnings are in effect for the De Grey River and the Sandy Sesert. Flood Watches are in effect for the West Kimberley, Western Desert, Warburton and Salt Lake Districts. Tropical Cyclone Ilsa could also cause a storm surge of up to 10 to 15 feet (3 to 4.5 meters) along the portion of the coast near where the center makes landfall.

Tropical Cyclone Ilsa Strengthens to Equivalent of Cat. 4 Hurricane

Tropical Cyclone Ilsa strengthened to the equivalent of a Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale on Wednesday night. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Cyclone Ilsa was located at latitude 18.1°S and longitude 119.2°E which put it about 175 miles (285 km) northwest of Wallal Downs, Australia. Ilsa was moving toward the south-southwest at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 130 m.p.h. (210 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 160 m.p.h. (260 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 942 mb.

A Tropical Cyclone Warning was in effect for the coast of Western Australia from south of Broome to Whim Creek. The Warning included Port Hedland. The Tropical Cyclone Warning extended inland to include De Grey, Marble Bar, Nullagine, Telfer and Parnngurr.

Tropical Cyclone Ilsa strengthened to the equivalent of a Category 4 hurricane on Wednesday night. A small circular eye was present at the center of Ilsa’s circulation. The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Tropical Cyclone Ilsa. Storms near the core generated strong upper level divergence that pumped large quantities of mass away from the tropical cyclone. The removal of large quantities of mass was causing the surface pressure to continue to decrease.

A weather station at Rowley Shoals measured a sustained wind speed of 95 m.p.h. (83 kt or 154 km/h). The weather station measured a wind gust of 132 m.p.h. (115 kt or 213 km/h). It also measured a sea level pressure of 942.3 mb.

Winds to hurricane/typhoon force extended out 35 miles (55 km) from the center of Tropical Cyclone Ilsa. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 120 miles (195 km) from the center. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Tropical Cyclone Ilsa was 25.1. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 13.4 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 38.5. Tropical Cyclone Ilsa was similar in size and intensity to Hurricane Harvey hit Texas in 2017.

Tropical Cyclone Ilsa will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 12 hours. Ilsa will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 30˚C. It will move under the axis of an upper level ridge that extends from northern Australia to the South Indian Ocean. The upper level winds are weak near the axis of the ridge and there will be little vertical wind shear. Tropical Cyclone Ilsa could continue to intensify during the next 12 hours.

Tropical Cyclone Ilsa will move around the western end of a high pressure system over western Australia. The high pressure system will steer Ilsa toward the southeast during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track, the center of Tropical Cyclone Ilsa is likely to make landfall on the coast of Western Australia between Pardoo Roadhouse and Wallal Downs in 12 hours. Ilsa will be the equivalent of a major hurricane when it makes landfall.

Tropical Cyclone Ilsa will bring very strong winds and locally heavy rain to Western Australia between Pardoo Roadhouse and Wallal Downs. The strong winds will be capable of causing regional severe damage. Ilsa could also produce strong winds in De Grey and Telfer when it moves inland. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations. Flood Watches are in effect for the West Kimberley, De Grey River, Sandy Desert, Western Desert, Warburton and Salt Lake Districts. Tropical Cyclone Ilsa could also cause a storm surge of up to 10 to 15 feet (3 to 4.5 meters) along the portion of the coast near where the center makes landfall.

Tropical Cyclone Ilsa Strengthens to Equivalent of a Major Hurricane

Tropical Cyclone Ilsa strengthened to the equivalent of a major hurricane over the South Indian Ocean northwest of Australia on Wednesday morning. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Cyclone Ilsa was located at latitude 16.8°S and longitude 119.4°E which put it about 200 miles (325 km) west-northwest of Broome, Australia. Ilsa was moving toward the south-southwest at 6 m.p.h. (10 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 115 m.p.h. (185 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 145 m.p.h. (230 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 956 mb.

A Tropical Cyclone Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast of Western Australia from Bidyadanga to Port Hedland. Tropical Cyclone Watches were in effect for the portions of the coast from Broome to Bidyadanga and from Port Hedland to Whim Creek.

Tropical Cyclone Ilsa strengthened to the equivalent of a major hurricane on Wednesday morning. A small circular eye was present at the center of Ilsa’s circulation. The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Tropical Cyclone Ilsa. Storms near the core generated strong upper level divergence that pumped large quantities of mass away from the tropical cyclone. The removal of large quantities of mass was causing the surface pressure to continue to decrease.

The size of the circulation around Tropical Cyclone Ilsa increased, when Ilsa strengthened. Winds to hurricane/typhoon force extended out 30 miles (50 km) from the center of Ilsa’s circulation. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 115 miles (185 km) from the center. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Tropical Cyclone Ilsa was 20.6. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 11.5 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 32.1. Tropical Cyclone Ilsa was similar in size and intensity to Hurricane Sally when Sally hit South Alabama in 2020.

Tropical Cyclone Ilsa will move through an environment very favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Ilsa will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 30˚C. It will move under the axis of an upper level ridge that extends from northern Australia to the South Indian Ocean. The upper level winds are weak near the axis of the ridge and there will be little vertical wind shear. Tropical Cyclone Ilsa will continue to intensify during the next 24 hours. Ilsa could intensify rapidly at times.

Tropical Cyclone Ilsa will move around the western end of a high pressure system over western Australia. The high pressure system will steer Ilsa toward the south during the next 24 hours. Tropical Cyclone Ilsa will move toward the southeast when it reaches the western end of the high pressure system on Thursday morning. On its anticipated track, Ilsa is likely to make landfall on the coast of Western Australia between Broome and Port Hedland in 30 hours. The center of Tropical Cyclone Ilsa could make landfall near Wallal Downs. Ilsa is likely to be the equivalent of a major hurricane when it makes landfall.

Tropical Cyclone Ilsa will bring very strong winds and locally heavy rain to Western Australia near Wallal Downs. The strong winds will be capable of causing severe damage. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations. Flood Watches are in effect for the West Kimberley, De Grey River, Sandy Desert, Western Desert, Warburton and Salt Lake Districts. Tropical Cyclone Ilsa could also cause a storm surge of up to 10 to 15 feet (3 to 4.5 meters) along the portion of the coast near where the center makes landfall.