Tag Archives: Timor Sea

Tropical Cyclone Lili Forms Over Timor Sea

Tropical Cyclone Lili formed over the Timor Sea on Thursday.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Cyclone Lili was located at latitude 9.1°S and longitude 128.8°E which put it about 100 miles (160 km) southeast of Tutuala, East Timor.  Lili was moving toward the south-southwest at 5 m.p.h. (8 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 991 mb.

The circulation around a low pressure system over the Timor Sea exhibited more organization on Thursday and the system was designated as Tropical Cyclone Lili.  Several bands of showers and thunderstorms began to wrap around the low level center of circulation.  Additional bands of showers and thunderstorms began to develop around the periphery of the circulation.  Storms near the center of circulation were generating upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the tropical cyclone.   The circulation around Tropical Cyclone Lili was relatively small.  Winds to tropical storm force only extended out about 60 miles (95 km) from the center of circulation.

Tropical Cyclone Lili will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 12 to 24 hours.  Lili will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  It will move under the western portion of an upper level ridge.  Tropical Cyclone Lili will move through an area where the upper level winds are not too strong during the next 12 to 24 hours and there will not be a lot of vertical wind shear.  Lili could intensify during that period.  Tropical Cyclone Lili will move closer to the western end of the ridge in about 24 hours.  There are strong northerly winds blowing around the western end of the ridge and there will be more vertical wind shear.  If the shear increases, then the circulation around Lili is likely to weaken.

Tropical Cyclone Lili will move north of a subtropical ridge.  The ridge is likely to steer Lili more toward the west.  On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone Lili could reach East Timor in about 36 hours.  Lili will bring gusty winds, but heavy rain and flooding are greater risks.  An alternative forecast scenario is possible.  If the vertical wind shear is not too strong and the vertical structure of Tropical Cyclone Lili remains intact, the upper level ridge could steer Lili more toward the south.  In that case Tropical Cyclone Lili could bring rain to Western Australia.

Tropical Cyclone Wallace Develops North of Western Australia

Tropical Cyclone Wallace developed over the Timor Sea north of Western Australia on Friday.  At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Cyclone Wallace was located at latitude 11.7°S and longitude 125.7°E which put it about 280 miles (440 km) north-northeast of Kuri Bay, Australia.  Wallace was moving toward the west at 6 m.p.h. (9 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 997 mb.

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology posted a Tropical Cyclone Warning from Kalumburu to Beagle Bay.

More thunderstorms developed near the center of a Tropical Low over the Timor Sea on Friday and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology designated the system as Tropical Cyclone Wallace.  The distribution of thunderstorms in the circulation around Wallace was asymmetrical.  Most of the thunderstorms were occurring west of the center of circulation and in bands in the western half of the tropical cyclone.  Bands in the eastern half of of Tropical Cyclone Wallace consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 150 miles (240 km) from the center of circulation.

Tropical Cyclone Wallace was moving north of an upper level ridge.  The ridge was producing strong easterly winds which were causing significant vertical wind shear.  Those winds and the shear were probably the cause of the asymmetrical distribution of thunderstorms.  Storms west of the center of circulation were generating upper level divergence which was pumping mass away to the west of Tropical Cyclone Wallace.

Tropical Cyclone Wallace may move into an area more favorable for intensification during the next day or two.  Wallace could move into an area where the upper level winds are not quite as strong.  Tropical Cyclone Wallace will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  So, if it moves into an area where the shear is less, then Tropical Cyclone Wallace is likely to strengthen.  There is a chance Wallace could intensify into the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon during the next two or three days.

Tropical Cyclone Wallace will move around the northwestern end of a subtropical ridge over Australia.  The ridge will steer Wallace toward the west-southwest during the next several days.  On its anticipated track the core of Tropical Cyclone Wallace is forecast to stay north of the coast of Western Australia during the next few days.

Tropical Cyclone Marcus Makes Landfall on North Coast of Australia

Tropical Cyclone Marcus made landfall on the northern coast of Western Australia east of Kalumburu on Saturday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Cyclone Marcus was located at latitude 14.2°S and longitude 127.7°E which put it about 70 miles (115 km) east of Kalumburu, Australia.  Marcus was moving toward the west-southwest at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 85 m.p.h. (140 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 984 mb.  The Australian Bureau of Meteorology issued a Warning for the portion of the coast between Wyndham and Beagle Bay not including Wyndham or Derby.

Tropical Cyclone Marcus strengthened as it moved over the Timor Sea on Saturday.  There was a small circular eye at the center of circulation.  The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of the circulation.  Storms in the core were generating upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the tropical cyclone.

Tropical Cyclone Marcus will weaken on Sunday while the core of the circulation moves over the extreme northern part of Western Australia.  Marcus is likely to strengthen when the center moves west of Kuri Bay and back out over water.  The Sea Surface Temperature of the water west of Kuri Bay is around 30°C.  The upper level winds will be weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Marcus will likely intensify into the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon after the center of circulation moves back over water.

Tropical Cyclone Marcus is moving north of a subtropical ridge over Australia.  The ridge is steering Marcus to the west-southwest and that general motion is expected to continue for several more days.  On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone Marcus will move over the Mitchell Plateau toward Kuri Bay.  Marcus will move away from the north coast of Western Australia when it moves west of Kuri Bay.

Tropical Cyclone Marcus Brings Wind and Rain to Darwin

Tropical Cyclone Marcus brought wind and rain to Darwin, Australia on Friday night.  A weather station at Darwin Harbor recorded a wind gust to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h).  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Cyclone Marcus was located at latitude 12.7°S and longitude 130.7°E which put it about 20 miles (30 km) southwest of Darwin, Australia.  Marcus was moving toward the southwest at 13 m.p.h. (21 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 982 mb.  The Australian Bureau of Meteorology issued a Warning for the portion of the coast from Cape Hotham to Mitchell Plateau including Darwin and the Tiwi Islands.  A Watch was issued for the portion of the coast from Cockatoo Island to Mitchell Plateau.

Tropical Cyclone Marcus intensified as it approached Darwin.  An eye developed at the center of circulation and a ring of strong thunderstorms surrounded the eye.  The strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of the circulation.  Storms around the core were generating upper level divergence which was pumping away mass from the tropical cyclone.

Tropical Cyclone Marcus will move through an area favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours.  Marcus will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  An upper level ridge over Australia is producing easterly winds which are blowing toward the top of the circulation.  Those winds are creating some vertical wind shear, but the shear is not strong enough to prevent intensification.  Tropical Cyclone Marcus could strengthen into the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon when it moves over the Timor Sea on Saturday.

Tropical Cyclone Marcus was being steered toward the southwest by the ridge over Australia and the southwesterly motion is expected to continue.  On its anticipated path the center of Tropical Cyclone Marcus will move across the Timor Sea on Saturday.  Marcus could approach the north coast of Western Australia east of Kalumburu in about 24 hours.

Tropical Cyclone Marcus Strengthens North of Australia

A Tropical Low north of Australia strengthened on Thursday and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology designated the system as Tropical Cyclone Marcus.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Cyclone Marcus was located at latitude 10.3°S and longitude 132.6°E which put it about 190 miles (320 km) northeast of Darwin, Australia.  Marcus was moving toward the southeast at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 998 mb.  The Australian Bureau of Meteorology had issued a Warning for the portion of the coast from Maningrida to Daly River Mouth including Darwin and the Tiwi Islands.  A watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from the Daly River Mouth to the Mitchell Plateau.

The circulation inside a Tropical Low north of Australia became better organized on Thursday which led the Australian Bureau of Meteorology to designate the system as Tropical Cyclone Marcus.  A primary band of showers and thunderstorms wrapped around the western and northern sides of the center of circulation.  Other bands of showers and storms were developing in other parts of the circulation.  Storms near the core of Marcus were generating upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the tropical cyclone.

Tropical Cyclone Marcus will be moving through an environment mostly favorable for intensification.  Marcus will be moving over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  It is moving in an area where the upper level winds are weak and there is little vertical wind shear.  The only factor that could inhibit intensification is the proximity of Tropical Cyclone Marcus to the northern coast of Australia.  If the center of Marcus remains north of the coast, then the tropical cyclone is likely to intensify.  If the center moves over land, then a slow weakening would occur.

Tropical Cyclone Marcus is currently moving toward the southeast, but a subtropical ridge over Australia will turn Marcus toward the southwest when it approaches the coast.  On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone Marcus will approach the northern coast of Australia in about 24 hours.  It is likely to move across the Cobourg Peninsula and over the Van Diemen Gulf.  Tropical Cyclone Marcus could be near Darwin in about 36 hours.  Marcus is forecast to continue southwest over the Timor Sea.

Tropical Cyclone Marcus is likely to bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to the northernmost portions of the Northern Territory of Australia.  The center will pass close to Darwin and it could bring gusty winds and drop heavy rain over that city.

Tropical Low Forms North of Australia

A Tropical Low formed north of Australia late on Wednesday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of the Tropical Low as located at latitude 9.2°S and longitude 130.9°E which put it about 155 miles (250 km) north of Milikapiti, Australia.  It was moving toward the east at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 30 m.p.h. (45 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1004 mb.  The Australian Bureau of Meteorology issued a Watch for the portion of the coast from Milingimbi to Daly River Mouth including Darwin and the Tiwi Islands.

A center of circulation developed in an area of showers and thunderstorms north of Australia late on Wednesday and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology classified the system as a Tropical Low.  The circulation was still organizing.  A short band of showers and thunderstorms wrapped around the southern and western sides of the center.  Other short rainbands were developing in other parts of the circulation.  Storms near the center of circulation were just beginning to generate upper level divergence.

The Tropical Low will move through an environment somewhat favorable for intensification.  It will mover over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  Westerly winds in the upper levels will cause some vertical wind shear, which will inhibit intensification.  However, the shear is not likely to be strong enough to prevent intensification.  The Tropical Low is likely to strengthen during the next 24 hours.  After that time the intensity will be influenced by how much of the circulation is over Australia.

The Tropical Low is being steered to the east by westerly winds north of Australia.  Those winds are forecast to weaken and the Tropical Low is expected to turn south toward the coast of Australia.  A subtropical ridge over Australia is expected to turn the Tropical Low toward the southwest in a day or so.  On its anticipated track the Tropical Low could be near the northern coast of Australia in 24 to 36 hours.  It could pass near the Cobourg Peninsula, Melville Island and Bathurst Island.  The Tropical Low could also bring gusty winds and heavy rain to the area near Darwin.

Tropical Cyclone Frances Intensifies Into Equivalent of a Hurricane

Tropical Cyclone Frances intensified into the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon on Friday as it moved northwest of Australia.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Cyclone Frances was located at latitude 12.6°S and longitude 124.1°E which put it about 200 miles (325 km) north of Kuri Bay, Australia.  Frances was moving toward the west-southwest at 9 m.p.h. (14 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 981 mb.

Tropical Cyclone Frances intensified into the equivalent of a hurricane/typhoon when it moved through a favorable environment.  Frances moved over water where the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) was near 30°C and the upper level winds were weak.  A primary rainband wrapped almost entirely around the center of circulation and an eyelike feature seemed to be indicated on some satellite imagery.  Thunderstorms around the eye generated upper level divergence which pumped out mass and the circulation assumed a more symmetrical circulation.  Other bands of showers and thunderstorms formed in the outer portions of the circulation.

Tropical Cyclone Frances may have reached its peak intensity.  Frances will continue to move over water where the SST is near 30°C.  However, it is about to move near the western end of an upper level ridge where there are stronger northerly winds.  Those stronger winds will create much more vertical wind shear and Tropical Cyclone Frances is likely to weaken during the next several days.

A subtropical ridge to the east of Frances is steering the tropical cyclone toward the west-southwest and that general motion is forecast to continue for the next several days.  On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone Frances poses no threat to Western Australia, although it could cause increased wave action along the coast.

Tropical Cyclone Frances Develops North of Western Australia

An area of low pressure northwest of Western Australia developed into Tropical Cyclone Frances on Thursday.  At 10:00 a.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Cyclone Frances was located at latitude 11.0°S and longitude 128.3°E which put it about 255 miles (410 km) north-northeast of Kalumburu, Australia.  Frances was moving toward the west-southwest at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (110 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 997 mb.

The organization of Tropical Cyclone Frances improved significantly during the past 24 hours.  A well organized center of circulation developed at the surface.  A primary rainband wrapped about two-thirds of the way around the southern and western sides of the center.  Additional bands of showers and thunderstorms formed in the outer portions of the circulation.  Thunderstorms near the core of the circulation generated upper level divergence which was pumping mass away to the south of the tropical cyclone.  Frances is a fairly small tropical cyclone and winds to tropical storm force only extend out about 100 miles (160 km) from the center.

Tropical Cyclone Frances will move through an environment that will be favorable for intensification during the next 24 to 36 hours.  Frances will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C while is moves across the Timor Sea.  An upper level ridge east of Tropical Cyclone Frances is producing northeasterly winds which are blowing toward the top of the circulation.  Vertical wind shear may be the reason that the primary rainband wrapped around the southern and western sides of the center.  However, the vertical shear does not appear to be strong enough to significantly affect the upper level divergence.  Frances is likely to intensify during the next day or so.  Eventually, Tropical Cyclone Frances will move into an area where there are strong upper level northwesterly winds.  A significant increase in vertical wind shear should weaken Frances when that occurs.

A subtropical ridge to the east of Frances is steering the tropical cyclone toward the west-southwest.  A general motion toward the west-southwest is expected to continue during the next few days.  On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Cyclone Frances is forecast to stay north of the coast of Western Australia.  However, any southward deviation of the track could bring stronger winds closer to the coast.

Tropical Cyclone Blanche Strengthens Near Coast of Western Australia

Tropical Cyclone Blanche strengthened on Sunday as it moved over the Timor Sea toward the coast of Western Australia.  At 7:00 p.m. EST on Sunday the center of Tropical Cyclone Blanche was located at latitude 14.0°S and longitude 128.2°E which put it about 100 miles (165 km) north of Wyndham, Australia.  Blanche was moving toward the southwest at 11 m.p.h. (17 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 988 mb.

The inner core of Tropical Cyclone Blanche became more organized on Sunday.  A band of thunderstorms wrapped about two thirds of the way around the southern and western portions of the center.  The band has the appearance of a partial eyewall.  The strongest winds are occurring in the band near the center.  The thunderstorms are generating upper level divergence which is pumping out mass to the west and southeast of the Tropical Cyclone Blanche.  The upper level divergence allowed the surface pressure to decrease and the wind speed to increase.

Tropical Cyclone Blanche will be over the Timor Sea for a few more hours.  It will be in an environment that is favorable for intensification during that time.  Blanche will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  An upper level ridge east of Blanche is producing northerly winds which are blowing toward the tropical cyclone.  The winds are causing moderate vertical wind shear, but the shear was not strong enough to prevent intensification on Sunday.  Tropical Cyclone Blanche could intensify a little more before it makes landfall.

A subtropical ridge is steering Tropical Cyclone Blanche toward the southwest and that general motion is expected to continue.  On its anticipated track Tropical Cyclone Blanche will make landfall on the coast of Western Australia northwest of Wyndham in a few hours.  Blanche will bring gusty winds and some storm surge to the coast.  It will cause locally heavy rain and the potential for flooding as it moves inland.