Tag Archives: Japan

Tropical Storm Meari Brings Rain to Tokyo

Tropical Storm Meari brought rain to Tokyo on Saturday morning. At 5:00 a.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Meari was located at latitude 35.4°N and longitude 139.2°E which put it about 90 miles (145 km) southwest of Tokyo, Japan. Meari was moving toward the northeast at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 998 mb.

Tropical Storm Meari brought rain to the region around Tokyo on Saturday morning. The heaviest rain was falling in bands in the eastern and southern parts of Meari’s circulation. Much of the heavier rain was falling south and east of Tokyo. Bands in the northern and western parts of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. The strongest winds were occurring along the coast of Honshu southeast of Tokyo.

Tropical Storm Meari was moving under the southern part of an upper level trough centered northwest of Japan. The upper level trough was producing southwesterly winds that were steering Meari toward the northeast. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Meari will move east of Japan during the next 24 hours. The rain over Honshu will diminish when Meari moves away from the coast.

Tropical Storm Meari will move through an environment unfavorable for a tropical cyclone during the next several days. Meari will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are colder than 26˚C. The upper level trough will continue to produce southwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of Meari’s circulation. Those winds will cause moderate vertical wind shear. The combination of colder Sea Surface Temperatures and moderate vertical wind shear could cause Tropical Storm Meari to make a transition to an extratropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Meari could strengthen a little during the transition to an extatropical cyclone.

Tropical Storm Meari Forms South of Japan

Tropical Storm Meari formed over the Western North Pacific Ocean south of Japan on Thursday afternoon. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Meari was located at latitude 29.2°N and longitude 136.0°E which put it about 500 miles (805 km) south-southwest of Tokyo, Japan. Meari was moving toward the north at 3 m.p.h. (5 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1003 mb.

The circulation around an area of low pressure over the Western North Pacific Ocean south of Japan strengthened on Thursday afternoon and the Japan Meteorological Agency designated the system as Tropical Storm Meari. The distribution of thunderstorms around Tropical Storm Meari was asymmetrical. Thunderstorms were occurring in bands in the southern half of Meari’s circulation. Bands in the northern half of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. Tropical Storm Meari was under the southern part of a narrow upper level ridge south of Japan that extended from east to west. The upper level ridge was producing northerly winds that were blowing toward the top of Meari. The winds were causing vertical wind shear and they were the reason for the asymmetrical distribution of thunderstorms. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 90 miles (145 km) in the southeastern quadrant of Tropical Storm Meari. The wind in the other parts of Meari’s circulation was blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Meari will move through an environment somewhat favorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. Meari will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28˚C. The narrow upper level ridge south of Japan will continue to cause moderate vertical wind shear during the next 12 hours. The wind shear will inhibit intensification during the next few hours. Tropical Storm Meari will move under the axis of the upper level ridge on Friday. The upper level winds are weak near the axis of the ridge and the vertical wind shear will decrease on Friday. Tropical Storm Meari will be in an environment favorable for intensification while it is under the axis of the ridge.

Tropical Storm Meari will move around the western end of a subtropical high pressure system over the Western North Pacific Ocean. The high pressure system will steer Meari toward the north during the next 18 hours. Meari will move toward the northeast later on Friday after it moves around the western end of the high pressure system. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Meari will approach the coast of Honshu near Tokyo in 36 hours. Meari could be a strong tropical storm when it nears Tokyo. Tropical Storm Meari will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to the region around Tokyo on Saturday.

Tropical Storm Songda Develops East of Okinawa

Tropical Storm Songda developed east of Okinawa on Thursday afternoon. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Songda was located at latitude 26.4°N and longitude 136.6°E which put it about 600 miles (970 km) east of Okinawa. Songda was moving toward the north-northwest at 29 m.p.h. (45 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb.

An area of low pressure strengthened east of Okinawa on Thursday afternoon and the Japan Meteorological Agency designated the system as Tropical Storm Songda. Tropical Storm Songda was revolving around the northeastern part of a much larger low pressure system (sometimes called a monsoon gyre) centered northeast of the Philippines. The interaction of Songda’s circulation with the larger low pressure system was producing an asymmetrical distribution of thunderstorms. Thunderstorms were occurring in bands in the northeastern half of Tropical Storm Songda. Bands in the southwestern half of Songda consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. Storms near the center of Songda generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away to the northeast of the tropical storm.

Tropical Storm Songda will move through an environment marginally favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Songda will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 30˚C. The circulation around the larger low pressure system will produce upper level winds from the southeast that will blow toward the top of Songda’s circulation. The winds in the lower levels of the atmosphere will also be blowing from the southeast and so there will be less vertical wind shear. The wind shear could still be strong enough to inhibit intensification. Songda could also move into a region where the air is drier. Tropical Storm Songda could strengthen a little during the next 24 hours, but wind shear and drier air are likely to limit intensification.

The large low pressure system northeast of the Philippines will steer Tropical Storm Songda toward the northwest during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Sondga could approach the northern Ryukyu Islands within 24 hours. Songda could bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to the northern Ryukyu Islands.

Typhoon Chaba Hits Southern China

Typhoon Chaba hit southern China on Saturday morning. At 5:00 a.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Typhoon Chaba was located at latitude 21.5°N and longitude 111.0°E which put it about 25 miles (40 km) east of Wuchuan, China. Chaba was moving toward the north-northwest at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 95 m.p.h. (150 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 978 mb.

The center of Typhoon Chaba made landfall on the south coast of China near Wuchuan and Dianbai in Guangdong on Saturday morning. Typhoon Chaba was strengthening when it made landfall. A small circular eye was as the center of Chaba’s circulation. Winds to typhoon force extended out 60 miles (95 km) from the center of Chaba. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 190 miles (305 km) from the center of circulation.

Typhoon Chaba will move around the western end of a high pressure system over the Western North Pacific Ocean. The high pressure system will steer Chaba toward the north-northwest during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track Typhoon Chaba will move inland over southern China. Chaba will weaken gradually as it moves inland. Typhoon Chaba will bring strong winds and locally heavy rain to southwestern Guangdong. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations. There were reports a ship broke in two in heavy seas in the South China Sea.

Elsewhere over the Western North Pacific Ocean, Tropical Storm Aere brought gusty winds and heavy rain to the center Ryukyu Islands. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Aere was located at latitude 26.3°N and longitude 129.1°E which put it about 115 miles (185 km) east-southeast of Okinawa. Aere was moving toward the north-northwest at 17 m.p.h. (19 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 994 mb.

Chaba Strengthens to a Typhoon Northeast of Hainan

Former Tropical Storm Chaba strengthened to a typhoon northeast of Hainan Island on Friday afternoon. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Typhoon Chaba was located at latitude 20.4°N and longitude 111.8°E which put it about 100 miles (160 km) southeast of Wuchuan, China. Chaba was moving toward the northwest at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 981 mb.

Former Tropical Storm Chaba strengthened to a typhoon over the warm water in the northern South China Sea on Friday afternoon. The inner end of a rainband wrapped around the center of Typhoon Chaba’s circulation and the strongest winds were occurring in a ring around the center. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Typhoon Chaba. Storms near the core generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the typhoon. Winds to typhoon force extended out 60 miles (95 km) from the center of Chaba. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 180 miles (290 km) from the center of circulation.

Typhoon Chaba will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 12 hours. Chaba will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. It will move under the middle of an upper level ridge over the northern part of the South China Sea. The upper level winds are weak near the center of the ridge and there will be little vertical wind shear. Typhoon Chaba could continue to intensify during the next 12 hours.

Typhoon Chaba will move around the western end of a high pressure system over the Western North Pacific Ocean during the next 24 hours. The high will steer Chaba toward the northwest. On its anticipated track the center of Typhoon Chaba could make landfall on the coast of southern China near Wuchuan in 12 hours. Chaba will bring strong winds and locally heavy rain to southwestern Guangdong. Heavy rain is likely to cause flash floods in some locations.

Elsewhere over the Western North Pacific Ocean, Tropical Storm Aere intensified gradually southeast of Okinawa. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Aere was located at latitude 23.6°N and longitude 130.4°E which put it about 305 miles (495 km) southeast of Okinawa. Aere was moving toward the north-northwest at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 994 mb. Tropical Storm Aere is forecast to move toward the north-northwest and to continue to strengthen gradually. Aere could be near Okinawa in 18 hours.

Typhoon Malakas Brings Winds and Rain to Iwo To

Typhoon Malakas brought strong winds and heavy rain to Iwo To on Thursday. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Typhoon Malakas was located at latitude 25.6°N and longitude 140.4°E which put it about 100 miles (160 km) west of Two To. Malakas was moving toward the north-northeast at 24 m.p.h (39 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 105 m.p.h. (165 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 125 m.p.h. (200 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 964 mb.

Typhoon Malakas weakened as it approached Iwo To, but Malakas still brought strong winds and heavy rain to the island. An upper level trough near Japan was producing strong southwesterly winds that were blowing toward the top of Malakas’ circulation. Those winds were causing strong vertical wind shear and the shear was affecting the distribution of thunderstorms. The strongest thunderstorms were occurring in bands in the eastern half of Typhoon Malakas. Bands in the western half of the circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.

There continued to be a large circulation around Typhoon Malakas. Winds to typhoon force extended out 60 miles (95 km) from the center of Malakas. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 200 miles (320 km) from the center of circulation. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Malakas was 17.8. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 21.1 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 38.9.

Typhoon Malakas will move through an environment unfavorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. Malakas will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 23˚C. The upper level trough near Japan will continue to produce strong southwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of the typhoon’s circulation. Those winds will cause strong vertical wind shear. Typhoon Malakas will continue to weaken during the next 36 hours. The combination of colder water and strong vertical wind shear will cause Malakas to make a transition to a strong extratropical cyclone.

The upper level trough near Japan will steer Typhoon Malakas quickly toward the northeast during the next 36 hours. On its anticipated track Typhoon Malakas will cross the Ogasawara Islands during the next 24 hours. Malakas will bring strong winds and heavy rain the Ogasawara Islands. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations. Weather conditions should improve on Iwo To on Friday when Malakas moves away from the island.

Typhoon Malakas Intensifies to Equivalent of Cat. 4 Hurricane

Typhoon Malakas intensified to the equivalent of a Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale on Wednesday morning. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Typhoon Malakas was located at latitude 19.3°N and longitude 137.5°E which put it about 475 miles (770 km) south-southwest of Two To. Malakas was moving toward the north-northeast at 13 m.p.h (20 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 130 m.p.h. (210 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 160 m.p.h. (260 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 939 mb.

Typhoon Malakas strengthened to the equivalent of a Cat. 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale over the Western North Pacific Ocean south-southwest of Iwo To on Wednesday morning. A circular eye with a diameter of 30 miles (50 km) was at the center of Malakas’ circulation. The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core to Typhoon Malakas. Storms near the core generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the typhoon.

The circulation around Typhoon Malakas was large. Winds to typhoon force extended out 65 miles (105 km) from the center of Malakas. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 260 miles (415 km) from the center of circulation. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Malakas was 25.1. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 24.0 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 49.1.

Typhoon Malakas will move into an environment unfavorable for intensification during the next 12 hours. Malakas will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 26˚C. An upper level trough west of Japan will move toward Malakas. When the upper level trough gets closer to Typhoon Malakas, it will produce southwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of the typhoon’s circulation. Those winds will cause the vertical wind shear to increase. When the shear increases, Typhoon Malakas will start to weaken.

The upper level trough west of Japan will steer Typhoon Malakas toward the north-northeast during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track Malakas could approach Iwo To in 30 hours. Typhoon Malakas will bring strong winds and heavy rain to Iwo To and the Ogasawara Islands. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations.

Typhoon Malakas Intensifies Southwest of Iwo To

Typhoon Malakas intensified southwest of Iwo To on Tuesday morning. At 5:00 a.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Typhoon Malakas was located at latitude 16.1°N and longitude 135.2°E which put it about 740 miles (1195 km) southwest of Two To. Malakas was moving toward the north at 5 m.p.h (8 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 120 m.p.h. (195 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 967 mb.

Typhoon Malakas intensified more quickly over the Western North Pacific Ocean southwest of Iwo To on Tuesday morning. A circular eye developed at the center of Malakas’ circulation. The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Typhoon Malakas. Storms near the core generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the typhoon. Winds to typhoon force extended out 45 miles (75 km) from the center of Malakas. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 190 miles (305 km) from the center of circulation.

Typhoon Malakas will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Malakas will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28˚C. It will move under the western part of an upper level ridge over the Western North Pacific Ocean. The ridge will produce southerly winds that will blow toward the top of Malakas’ circulation. The winds at lower levels in the atmosphere will also blow from the south and there will not be much vertical wind shear. Typhoon Malakas will intensify during the next 24 hours. Malakas could undergo a period of rapid intensification since an inner core with an eye and an eyewall has developed. Typhoon Malakas could strengthen to a the equivalent of a major hurricane during the next 24 hours.

Typhoon Malakas will move around the western part of a high pressure system over the Western North Pacific Ocean during the next 24 hours. The high pressure system will steer Malakas toward the north during that time period. Typhoon Malakas will move toward the northeast after it moves around the western end of the high pressure system. On its anticipated track Malakas could approach Iwo To in 48 hours.

Elsewhere over the Western North Pacific Ocean, Tropical Depression Megi weakened just east of the Philippines. There were reports of mudslides and casualties caused by heavy rain dropped by Megi. At 5:00 a.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Depression Megi was located at latitude 11.0°N and longitude 126.0°E which put it about 30 miles (50 km) east of Guiuan, Philippines. Megi was moving toward the east at 5 m.p.h (8 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1004 mb.

Typhoon Nyatoh Brings Wind and Rain to Iwo To

Typhoon Nyatoh brought wind and rain to Iwo To on Friday. At 10:00 a.m. EST on Friday the center of Typhoon Nyatoh was located at latitude 24.3°N and longitude 142.9°E which put it about 80 miles (130 km) southeast of Iwo To. Nyatoh was moving toward the northeast at 24 m.p.h. (39 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 125 m.p.h. (200 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 155 m.p.h. (250 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 947 mb.

Bands in the northwestern side of Typhoon Nyatoh brought strong winds and heavy rain to Iwo To on Friday. The core of Nyatoh’s circulation where the strongest winds were occurring passed to the southeast of Iwo To. An upper level trough over Japan was producing strong southwesterly winds that were blowing toward the top of Typhoon Nyatoh’s circulation. Those winds caused strong vertical wind shear and the shear started to weaken Nyatoh when it approached Iwo To. A circular eye was still present at the center of Typhoon Nyatoh, but the distribution of thunderstorms was asymmetrical. The strongest thunderstorms were occurring around the eye and in bands in the northern half of Nyatoh. Bands in the southern half of the typhoon consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.

Even though Typhoon Nyatoh was weakening, it was still the equivalent of a major hurricane. Winds to typhoon force extended out 60 miles (95 km) from the center of Nyatoh. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 200 miles (320 km) from the center of circulation. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Nyatoh was 23.6. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 22.2 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 45.8.

The upper level trough over Japan will steer Typhoon Nyatoh quickly toward the northeast during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track Nyatoh will move away from Iwo To and the weather conditions should improve. Typhoon Nyatoh will move through an environment that will be unfavorable for a typhoon. Nyatoh will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 24.5˚C. The upper level trough will continue to produce strong vertical wind shear. A surface high pressure system over eastern Asia will transport drier air toward the western side of Nyatoh’s circulation. Cooler water, strong vertical wind shear, and drier air will cause Typhoon Nyatoh to weaken rapidly during the next 24 hours.

Typhoon Nyatoh Strengthens to Equivalent of a Major Hurricane

Typhoon Nyatoh strengthened to the equivalent of a major hurricane over the Western North Pacific Ocean southwest of Iwo To on Thursday. At 10:00 a.m. EST on Thursday the center of Typhoon Nyatoh was located at latitude 18.7°N and longitude 137.1°E which put it about 540 miles (875 km) southwest of Iwo To. Nyatoh was moving toward the northeast at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 115 m.p.h. (185 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 145 m.p.h. (230 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 955 mb.

Typhoon Nyatoh rapidly intensified to the equivalent of a major hurricane on Thursday. A circular eye with a diameter of 35 miles (55 km) formed at the center of Nyatoh. The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Typhoon Nyatoh. Storms near the core generated strong upper level divergence that pumped mass away to the northeast of the typhoon.

The circulation around Typhoon Nyatoh increased in size on Thursday. Winds to typhoon force extended out 65 miles (105 km) from the center of Nyatoh. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 220 miles (355 km) from the center of circulation. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Nyatoh was 20.6. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 22.1 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 42.7.

Typhoon Nyatoh will move through an environment that will become unfavorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Nyatoh will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28˚C. An upper level trough near Japan will produce southwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of Nyatoh’s circulation. Those winds will cause the vertical wind shear to increase during the next 24 hours. Clockwise flow around a surface high pressure system centered over eastern Asia will transport drier air toward the northwestern part of Nyatoh’s circulation. The drier air will begin to be pulled into the northwestern part of Typhoon Nyatoh’s circulation during the next 24 hours. The combination of more vertical wind shear and drier air will cause Typhoon Nyatoh to start to weaken.

The upper level trough near Japan will steer Typhoon Nyatoh toward the northeast during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track Typhoon Nyatoh could approach Iwo To on Friday. Although Nyatoh will weaken, it will bring strong winds and locally heavy rain to Iwo To.