Tag Archives: Kyushu

Tropical Storm Chanthu Brings Gusty Winds and Rain to Japan

Tropical Storm Chanthu brought gusty winds and rain to parts of Japan on Friday. At 6:00 a.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Chanthu was located at latitude 33.7°N and longitude 130.6°E which put it about 10 miles (15 km) east of Fukuoka, Japan. Chanthu was moving toward the east-northeast at 17 m.p.h. (28 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 990 mb.

Tropical Storm Chanthu brought gusty winds to northern Kyushu and western Honshu on Friday. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 115 miles (185 km) from the center of Chanthu. The strongest winds were occurring in the parts of Chanthu’s circulation that were over water and in the mountains of western Japan. The heaviest rain was falling on the eastern side of Tropical Storm Chanthu.

Tropical Storm Chanthu will be steered quickly toward the east-northeast by the westerly winds in the middle latitudes. Tropical Storm Chanthu will move across Honshu during the next two days. The center of Tropical Storm Chanthu could be near Kyoto in 24 hours and near Tokyo in 36 hours. The upper level westerly winds will cause moderate vertical wind shear. The wind shear and movement across land will cause Chanthu to weaken gradually during the next 48 hours.

Tropical Storm Chanthu Spins between Japan and China

Tropical Storm Chanthu spun between Japan and China on Wednesday. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Chanthu was located at latitude 30.5°N and longitude 125.2°E which put it about 360 miles (585 km) west-southwest of Kagoshima, Japan. Chanthu was moving toward the northwest at 4 m.p.h. (6 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 991 mb.

Tropical Storm Chanthu remained nearly stationary on Wednesday as it spun over the East China Sea between Japan and China. The atmospheric environment around Chanthu became more favorable for intensification when an upper level ridge moved over the tropical storm. Chanthu strengthened when the upper level ridge enhanced the upper level divergence that pumped more mass away from the tropical storm. The enhanced upper level divergence also contributed to the formation of more thunderstorms in the bands revolving around the center of Tropical Storm Chanthu. A rainband wrapped most of the way around the center of Chanthu and a new eye appeared to be forming at the center of the tropical storm. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 190 miles (305 km) on the northern side of Chanthu. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 90 miles (145 km) in the southern half of the circulation.

Tropical Storm Chanthu will move through an environment somewhat favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Chanthu will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 27˚C. Chanthu could mix cooler water to the surface while it remains nearly stationary, which could inhibit intensification. The upper level ridge will continue to enhance divergence, which will be favorable for intensification. Tropical Storm Chanthu is likely to intensify during the next 24 hours and it could strengthen back to a typhoon.

The steering winds are weak in the middle of the upper level ridge and Tropical Storm Chanthu may not move much during the next 12 to 18 hours. An upper level trough over eastern Asia will move eastward on Thursday. The upper level trough will start to steer Chanthu toward the west in 12 to 18 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Chanthu could approach Kyushu in 30 hours. Chanthu could be a typhoon when it reaches Kyushu. It will bring strong, gusty winds and locally heavy rain. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations.

Tropical Storm Lupit Brings Rain to Japan

Tropical Storm Lupit brought rain to Japan on Sunday. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Tropical Storm Lupit was located at latitude 32.3°N and longitude 131.6°E which put it about 20 miles (30 km) southwest of Miyazaki, Japan. Lupit was moving toward the east-northeast at 26 m.p.h. (42 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 990 mb.

Tropical Storm Lupit made landfall on the coast of Kyushu near Kagoshima on Sunday. Lupit was being steered quickly toward the east-northeast by an upper level trough near the Korean Peninsula. The trough was producing strong southwesterly winds that were blowing toward the top of Lupit’s circulation. Those winds were causing strong vertical wind shear and they were affecting the distribution of rain in Tropical Storm Lupit. Most of the heavier rain was falling in bands north and east of the center of Lupit. The heavier rain was falling over Shikoku, northern Kyushu and southwestern Honshu. Bands south and west of the center of circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. The strongest winds were occurring in the southern half of Tropical Storm Lupit. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 160 miles (260 km) on the south side of Lupit. The winds in the northern half of the circulation were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

The trough near the Korean Peninsula will steer Tropical Storm Lupit quickly toward the northeast during the next 36 hours. On its anticipated track the center of Lupit will move over the southern Sea of Japan. The center of Tropcial Storm Lupit could be near northern Honshu in 36 hours. Rain will spread over the rest of Honshu and Hokkaido during the next two days. Locally heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations.

Tropical Storm Lupit will move through an environment only marginally favorable for intensification. Lupit will move over water in the Sea of Japan where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28°C. However, the upper level trough will continue to cause strong vertical wind shear. The lower part of Lupit’s circulation will also be disrupted while it passes over land. Tropical Storm Lupit is not likely to strengthen significantly and it could weaken if the center does not move over the Sea of Japan.

Elsewhere over the Western North Pacific Ocean, Tropical Storm Mirinae was moving eastward away from Japan. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Tropical Storm Mirinae was located at latitude 36.6°N and longitude 144.7°E which put it about 230 miles (370 km) east-northeast of Tokyo, Japan. Mirinae was moving toward the northeast at 18 m.p.h. (30 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 990 mb.

Typhoon Chan-hom Turns Toward Japan

Typhoon Chan-hom turned toward Japan on Wednesday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Typhoon Chan-hom was located at latitude 27.5°N and longitude 132.9°W which put it about 515 miles (825 km) south-southwest of Osaka, Japan.  Chan-hom was moving toward the northwest at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 973 mb.

Typhoon Chan-hom strengthened slowly on Wednesday.  An eye with a diameter of 35 miles (55 km) formed at the center of Chan-hom.  The eye was surrounded by a broken ring of thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Typhoon Chan-hom.  Storms near the core generated upper level divergence which pumped mass away to the northeast of the typhoon.

The circulation around Typhoon Chan-hom was large.  Winds to typhoon force extended out 60 miles (95 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 200 miles (320 km) from the center of Chan-hom.

Typhoon Chan-hom will move through an environment somewhat favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours.  Chan-hom will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  It will move under the western end of an upper level ridge.  The ridge will produce southerly winds which will blow toward the top of Typhoon Chan-hom.  Those winds will cause moderate vertical wind shear, which will inhibit intensification.  The wind shear will limit intensification, but Chan-hom could get stronger during the next 24 hours.  An upper level trough over eastern Asia will cause stronger southwesterly winds to blow toward Typhoon Chan-hom in a day or so.  Those winds will cause stronger vertical wind shear and they will cause Chan-hom to start to weaken.

Typhoon Chan-hom will move around the western end of a subtropical high pressure system over the Western North Pacific Ocean during the next 48 hours.  The high will steer Chan-hom toward the north during that time period.  The upper trough over eastern Asia will turn Typhoon Chan-hom toward the northeast during the weekend.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Chan-hom will be southeast of Kyushu and south of Shikoku in about 48 hours.

Typhoon Haishen Drops Heavy Rain over South Korea

Typhoon Haishen dropped heavy rain over South Korea on Sunday night. Haishen weakened to a tropical storm after it made landfall on South Korea.   At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Tropical Storm Haishen was located at latitude 36.6°N and longitude 128.8°E which put it about 30 miles north-northwest of Busan, South Korea.  Haishen was moving toward the north at 27 m.p.h. (43 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 969 mb.

The center of Typhoon Haishen passed just to the west of Kyushu earlier on Sunday.  A weather station at Makurazaki, Japan reported a wind speed of 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and a pressure of 966.6 mb.

Typhoon Haishen began dropping heavy rain over parts of South Korea hours before the center made landfall west of Busan.  Heavy rain was falling on some of the same places that also received heavy rain from Typhoon Maysak a few days ago.  The additional rain will cause flash floods in some locations.  Tropical Storm Haishen will continue to weak as it moves rapidly toward the north.

Typhoon Haishen Brings Wind and Rain to Northern Ryukyu Islands

Typhoon Haishen brought wind and rain to the northern Ryukyu Islands on Saturday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Typhoon Haishen was located at latitude 28.3°N and longitude 130.4°E which put it about 170 miles (280 km) east-northeast of Okinawa.  Haishen was moving toward the north-northwest at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 110 m.p.h. (175 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 130 m.p.h. (210 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 945 mb.

The center of Typhoon Haishen passed west of Minami-Daito Jima on Saturday.  A weather station there measured a wind speed of 72 m.p.h. (116 km/h) and a pressure of 943.6 mb.

The circulation around around Typhoon Haishen developed concentric eyewalls on Saturday.  The smaller original eyewall started to weaken as low level convergence became more concentrated into the much larger outer eyewall.  The strongest winds were originally found in the inner eyewall, but those wind speeds decreased.  The stronger winds were blowing in the larger outer eyewall on Saturday night.

The concentric eyewall structure produced an increase in the size of the circulation around Typhoon Haishen.  Winds to typhoon force extended out 100 miles (160 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 325 miles (530 km) from the center.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Haishen was 19.2.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 37.2 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 56.4.  Typhoon Haishen was capable of causing widespread serious damage.

Typhoon Haishen will move into a less favorable environment during the next 24 hours.  Haishen will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  Drier air over Asia will get pulled into the circulation.  Wind shear will increase when Typhoon Haishen moves farther north because it will get closer to the upper level westerly winds in the middle latitudes.  The effects of the concentric eyewalls, drier air and more wind shear will cause Typhoon Haishen to gradually weaken.

Typhoon Haishen will move around the western end of a subtropical high pressure system over the Western North Pacific Ocean.  The high will steer Haishen toward the north.  On its anticipated track the center of Typhoon Haishen will pass near the western part of Kyushu in about 12 hours.  Haishen will reach South Korea in about 24 hours.  Typhoon Haishen will bring strong winds and heavy rain to parts of Kyushu and South Korea.  Heavy rain could cause flash floods, especially in places that received heavy rain from Typhoon Maysak a few days ago.

Typhoon Maysak Brings Wind and Rain to South Korea

Typhoon Maysak brought wind and rain to South Korea on Wednesday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Typhoon Maysak was located at latitude 36.9°N and longitude 128.9°E which put it about 30 miles (50 km) north-northwest of Busan, South Korea.  Maysak was moving toward the north-northeast at 30 m.p.h. (50 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 105 m.p.h. (165 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 950 mb.

The center of Typhoon Maysak made landfall on the south coast of South Korea west of Busan on Wednesday.  The large circulation around Maysak brought gusty winds and heavy rain to much of the Korean Peninsula.  Winds to typhoon force extended out 60 miles (95 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 200 miles (320 km) from the center.  The heavy rain was falling on ground that was saturated by previous tropical cyclones and other weather systems.  The rain will likely cause widespread flash flooding.

Typhoon Maysak was being steered quickly toward the north by an upper level trough over eastern Asia.  On its anticipated track the center of Maysak will move along the east coast of the Korean Peninsula.  Typhoon Maysak will weaken and it will made a transition to an extratropical cyclone during the next 24 hours.

Elsewhere over the Western North Pacific Ocean, Typhoon Haishen strengthened south of Iwo To.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Typhoon Haishen was located at latitude 20.3°N and longitude 138.8°E which put it about 350 miles (560 km) south-southwest of Iwo To.  Haishen was moving toward the west-northwest at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 105 m.p.h. (165 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 979 mb.

Typhoon Haishen will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 36 to 48 hours.  Haishen will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Typhoon Haishen will continue to intensify and it is likely to strengthen into the equivalent of a major hurricane.

Typhoon Haishen will move around the western end of a subtropical high pressure system over the Western North Pacific Ocean.  The high will steer Haishen toward the northwest during the next several days.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Haishen could approach the northern Ryukyu Islands in about 72 hours.  Haishen could eventually bring wind and rain to the same areas in Kyushu and South Korea affected by Typhoon Maysak.

Large Typhoon Maysak Churns Toward South Korea

Large, powerful Typhoon Maysak churned toward South Korea on Tuesday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Typhoon Maysak was located at latitude 30.1°N and longitude 126.9°E which put it about 405 miles (655 km) south-southwest of Busan, South Korea.  Maysak was moving toward the north-northeast at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 130 m.p.h. (210 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 160 m.p.h. (260 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 932 mb.

Typhoon Maysak neared the completion of an eyewall replacement cycle on Tuesday which resulted in an increase in the size of the circulation.  The original inner eyewall had not quite dissipated, but low level convergence was focused on the much larger outer eyewall.  Winds to typhoon force extended out 90 miles (145 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 240 miles (390 km) from the center of Maysak.

Typhoon Maysak was a large, dangerous tropical cyclone.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) was 25.1.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 27.5 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 52.6.  Typhoon Maysak was capable of causing widespread major damage.

Since Typhoon Maysak was near the end of an eyewall replacement cycle, it will likely weaken slowly during the next 18 hours.  Maysak will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C.  An upper level trough over eastern Asia will approach Typhoon Maysak on Wednesday.  The trough will produce southwesterly winds which will blow toward the top of the circulation.  Those winds will cause more vertical wind shear and the shear will cause Typhoon Maysak to weaken more quickly.

Typhoon Maysak will move around the western end of a subtropical high pressure system over the Western North Pacific Ocean.  The high will steer Maysak toward the north during the next 24 hours.  On its anticipated track the core of Typhoon Maysak is likely to pass west of Kyushu.  Maysak could reach South Korea in about 18 hours.  Typhoon Maysak could be the equivalent of a large, major hurricane when it gets to South Korea.  Maysak will produce very strong winds over South Korea.  It will also drop heavy rain and flash floods could occur.

Elsewhere over the Western North Pacific Ocean, Tropical Storm Haishen strengthened south of Iwo To.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Storm Haishen was located at latitude 20.1°N and longitude 142.8°E which put it about 340 miles (545 km) south-southeast of Iwo To.  Haishen was moving toward the west-southwest at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1000 mb.  Tropical Storm Haishen is forecast to strengthen into a typhoon and it could move toward western Japan later this week.

Typhoon Maysak Brings Wind and Rain to the Ryukyu Islands

Typhoon Maysak brought winds and rain to the Ryukyu Islands on Monday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Typhoon Maysak was located at latitude 27.5°N and longitude 126.5°E which put it about 110 miles (175 km) west-northwest of Kadena AFB, Okinawa.  Maysak was moving toward the north-northwest at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 130 m.p.h. (210 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 160 m.p.h. (260 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 932 mb.

The eye and eyewall of Typhoon Maysak passed west of Okinawa on Monday.  Rainbands on the eastern side of Maysak passed over Okinawa and some of the other southern Ryukyu Islands.  A weather station at Naha reported a sustained wind speed of 58 m.p.h. (93 km/h).  A station at Kitahari (Kumejima Airport), which was closer to the center of Typhoon Maysak reported a sustained wind speed of 89 m.p.h. (144 km/h).

Satellite and radar images suggest that concentric eyewalls may have formed at the core of Typhoon Maysak.  The inner eye had a diameter of 8 miles (13 km).  A much larger outer eye with a diameter of approximately 100 miles (160 km) surrounded the inner eye.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the large core of Maysak.  Storms near the core were generating upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the typhoon.

The circulation around Typhoon Maysak was large.  Winds to typhoon force extended out 70 miles (110 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 200 miles (320 km) from the center.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Maysak was 25.1.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 25.5 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI).  Maysak was capable of causing widespread major damage.

Typhoon Maysak will move through an environment capable of supporting a strong typhoon during the next 24 hours, but it has likely reached its peak intensity.  The formation of concentric eyewalls normally results in a weaker, but larger tropical cyclone.  The wind speed will decrease when the inner eyewall dissipates.  When that occurs, the maximum wind speeds will occur in the larger outer eyewall.  Since Maysak will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C, it will remain a typhoon for another 24 to 36 hours.

Typhoon Maysak will move around the western end of a subtropical high pressure system over the Western North Pacific Ocean.  The high will steer Maysak toward the north during the next 36 hours.  On its anticipated track the center of Typhoon Maysak will pass west of Kyushu.  Typhoon Maysak could reach South Korea in 36 hours

Elsewhere over the Western North Pacific Ocean, Tropical Depression 11W was passing southeast of Iwo To.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Depression 11W was located at latitude 21.7°N and longitude 144.2°E which put it about 290 miles (470 km) southeast of Iwo To.  The depression was moving toward the west-southwest at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1006 mb.

Large Powerful Typhoon Hagibis Turns Toward Japan

Large powerful Typhoon Hagibis turned toward Japan on Tuesday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Typhoon Hagibis was located at latitude 20.2°N and longitude 140.1°E which put it about 350 miles (565 km) south of Iwo To.  Hagibis was moving toward the northwest at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 160 m.p.h. (260 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 195 m.p.h. (315 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 915 mb.

Typhoon Hagibis appeared to complete an eyewall replacement cycle on Tuesday.  The original tiny pinhole eye was no longer visible on satellite imagery.  A larger circular eye with a diameter of 24 miles (39 km) was at the center of Hagibis.  The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Typhoon Hagibis.  Storms around the core were generating strong upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the typhoon in all directions.

Completion of the eyewall replacement cycle increased the size of the circulation around Typhoon Hagibis.  Winds to typhoon force extended out 115 miles (185 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 350 miles (565 km) from the center.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Hagibis was 35.0.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 38.1 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 73.1.  Hagibis was capable of causing extensive catastrophic damage.

Typhoon Hagibis will move through an environment capable of supporting intense typhoons during the next 24 to 36 hours.  Hagibis will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Typhoon Hagibis will move closer to the upper level westerly winds in the middle latitudes in two or three days.  Those winds will cause more vertical wind shear and Hagibis will weaken when the shear increases.

Typhoon Hagibis will move around the western end of a subtropical high pressure system over the Western North Pacific Ocean.  The high will steer Hagibis toward the north-northwest during the next 48 hours.  The upper level westerly winds will steer Typhoon Hagibis quickly toward the northeast later this week.  On its anticipated track the center of Typhoon Hagibis could approach the coast of Honshu near Tokyo in 72 to 84 hours.  Hagibis could bring strong winds and heavy rain to Tokyo.  The large circulation around Typhoon Hagibis will mean that much of central Honshu could experience gusty winds and winds to tropical storm force could affect parts of Kyushu and Shikoku.