Tag Archives: Hong Kong

Tropical Storm Atsani Passes Just South of Taiwan

Tropical Storm Atsani passed just south of Taiwan early on Friday. At 4:00 a.m. EST on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Atsani was located at latitude 21.5°N and longitude 120.7°E which put it about 30 miles (50 km) south of Taiwan. Atsani was moving toward the west-northwest at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 995 mb.

The center of Tropical Storm Atsani passed just to the south of the southern tip of Taiwan early on Friday. Radar images from the Taiwan Central Weather Bureau showed the well organized structure of Tropical Storm Atsani.

There was a small, tight center of circulation. The center was surrounded by a partial eyewall and the strongest winds were occurring in eyewall. Multiple bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Tropical Storm Atsani. Bands in the northern half of Atsani were dropping heavy rain over the southern half of Taiwan. The heaviest rain was falling in parts of southeastern Taiwan where the wind was pushing air up the eastern slopes of mountains. Flash floods are possible in those areas. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 100 miles (160 km) from the center of Atsani.

Tropical Storm Atsani will be in an environment favorable for intensification during the next 12 to 24 hours. Atsani will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C. It will be in an area where the upper level winds are weaker and there will be little vertical wind shear. Tropical Storm Atsani could intensify during the next 24 hours and there is a chance it could strengthen into a typhoon. An upper level trough over eastern Asia will approach Atsani during the weekend. The trough will produce stronger southwesterly winds which will cause more vertical wind shear. Tropical Storm Atsani will weaken when the wind shear increases. If the shear is strong enough, the upper level winds could blow the top half of Atsani northeast of the low level circulation.

Tropical Storm Atsani will move south of a ridge of high pressure over the Western North Pacific Ocean. The high will steer Atsani toward the west during the next day or so. If the wind shear blows the top half of Tropical Storm Atsani northeast of the lower level circulation, then a surface high pressure system over eastern Asia could push the lower half of Atsani toward the southeast. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Atsani will pass southeast of Hong Kong and it could eventually move toward Vietnam.

Elsewhere over the Western North Pacific Ocean, the remnants of former Typhoon Goni were dropping heavy rain over parts of Vietnam. At 4:00 a.m. EST on Friday the center of Tropical Depression Goni was located at latitude 13.8°N and longitude 108.3°E which put it about 50 miles (80 km) west of Quy Nhon, Vietnam. Goni was moving toward the west at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 30 m.p.h. (50 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1003 mb. Tropical Depression Goni is dropping heavy rain over ground that is already saturated and the rain will make ongoing floods worse.

Tropical Storm Higos Makes Landfall Near Macau

Tropical Storm Higos made landfall near Macau on Tuesday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Storm Higos was located at latitude 22.6°N and longitude 112.5°E which put it about 75 miles (120 km) west of Hong Kong.  Higos was moving toward the northwest at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 992 mb.

Tropical Storm Higos made landfall on the coast of China just to the west of Macau on Tuesday night.  Higos intensified on Tuesday and an eye was beginning to form at the time of landfall.  A partial eyewall was on the southern side of the developing eye and the strongest winds were occurring in the partial eyewall.  Bands of thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Tropical Storm Higos.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 80 miles (130 km) from the center of circulation.

Tropical Storm Higos will weaken steadily as it moves inland over southern China.  Higos will bring gusty winds and it will drop locally heavy rainfall over parts of southern China.  Locally heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations.

Tropical Storm Higos Forms Southeast of Hong Kong

Tropical Storm Higos formed southeast of Hong Kong on Monday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Storm Higos was located at latitude 20.5°N and longitude 116.0°E which put it about 205 miles (335 km) southeast of Hong Kong.  Higos was moving toward the west-northwest at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1000 mb.

More thunderstorms developed near the center of a low pressure system southeast of Hong Kong on Monday night and the Japan Meteorological Agency designated the system as Tropical Storm Higos.  The circulation around Tropical Storm Higos was organizing quickly.  Thunderstorms were developing around the center of circulation.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the center of Higos.  Storms near the center of circulation were generating upper level divergence which pumped mass away from the tropical storm.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 100 miles (160 km) from the center of circulation.

Tropical Storm Higos will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 18 to 24 hours.  Higos will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Tropical Storm Higos will continue to intensify and there is a chance it could strengthen into a typhoon before it makes landfall on the coast of China.

Tropical Storm Higos will move around the southern side of a high pressure system over the Western North Pacific Ocean.  The high will steer Higos toward the west-northwest during the next 48 hours.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Higos will make landfall on the coast of China west of Macau near Yangjiang.  Higos will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to parts of southern China.  Locally heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations.

Weakening Tropical Depression Nuri Makes Landfall West of Hong Kong

A weakening Tropical Depression Nuri made landfall on the coast of China west of Hong Kong on Saturday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Depression Nuri was located at latitude 22.2°N and longitude 111.5°E which put it about 170 miles (280 km) west of Hong Kong.  Nuri was moving toward the northwest at 18 m.p.h. (29 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1001 mb.

Former Tropical Storm Nuri weakened to a tropical depression as it approached the coast of China on Saturday night.  An upper level ridge centered over China produced northeasterly winds which blew toward the top of former Tropical Storm Nuri.  Those winds caused moderate vertical wind shear and they blew the tops off thunderstorms in the eastern half of Nuri.  The wind shear blocked upper level divergence to the east of the tropical storm and the surface pressure increased.  The wind speed decreased and Nuri was downgraded to a tropical depression as it neared the coast of China.

Tropical Depression Nuri moved around the southwestern part of a subtropical high pressure system over the Western North Pacific Ocean.  The high steered Nuri toward the northwest.  Tropical Depression Nuri made landfall on the coast of China west of Hong Kong.  The center of Nuri crossed the coast between Dianbai and Yangjiang.  The circulation around Tropical Depression Nuri will continue to weaken as it moves farther inland.  Nuri will bring some heavy rain showers to parts of southeastern China before it dissipates.

Tropical Storm Nuri Develops of South China Sea

Tropical Storm Nuri developed over the South China Sea on Friday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Nuri was located at latitude 18.1°N and longitude 116.4°E which put it about 360 miles (580 km) south-southeast of Hong Kong.  Nuri was moving toward the west-northwest at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 998 mb.

The wind speed around former Tropical Depression 02W increased on Friday and the Japan Meteorological Agency designated the system as Tropical Storm Nuri.  The distribution of thunderstorms around Nuri was asymmetrical.  The strongest thunderstorms were occurring in bands in the southern and western parts of the circulation.  Bands in the eastern and northern portions of Tropical Storm Nuri consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.  Thunderstorms near the center of Nuri began to generate upper level divergence which pumped mass away from the tropical storm.

Tropical Storm Nuri will move through an environment somewhat favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours.  Nuri will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  It will move under the southwestern part of an upper level ridge centered over eastern China.  The ridge will produce northeasterly winds which will blow toward the top of the circulation.  Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear and the shear will inhibit intensification.  The wind shear could also cause the distribution of thunderstorms to remain asymmetrical.  Tropical Storm Nuri is likely to get stronger during the next 24 hours in spite of the vertical wind shear.

Tropical Storm Nuri will move around the southwestern part of a subtropical high pressure system over the Western North Pacific Ocean.  The high will steer Nuri toward the northwest during the next 24 to 36 hours.  On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Storm Nuri will approach the coast of China southwest of Hong Kong in about 24 hours.  Nuri will drop locally heavy rain over parts of southeastern China.

Tropical Depression Develops West of Luzon

A tropical depression developed west of Luzon on Thursday night.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Depression 02W was located at latitude 16.3°N and longitude 119.2°E which put it about 135 miles (215 km) northwest of Manila, Philippines.  The depression was moving toward the west-northwest at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb.

An area of low pressure moved west of Luzon on Thursday night and several weather agencies classified the system as a tropical depression.  The circulation around Tropical Depression 02W was not well organized.  There were a number of fragmented bands of showers and thunderstorms revolving around the center of the depression.  The strongest thunderstorms were in bands west and north of the center.  Bands east of the center of circulation were still over the Philippines and those bands consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds.

Tropical Depression 02W will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 24 to 36 hours.  The depression will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30.5°C.  It will move under the southwestern portion of an upper level ridge centered northeast of Taiwan.  The ridge will produce easterly winds which will blow toward the top of the depression.  Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear and the shear will inhibit intensification.  Tropical Depression 02W is likely to intensify into a tropical storm during the next 24 hours in spite of the vertical wind shear.

Tropical Depression 02W will move around the southwestern end of a subtropical high pressure system over the Western North Pacific Ocean.  The high will steer the depression toward the northwest during the next 36 to 48 hours.  On its anticipated track Tropical Depression 02W will approach the coast of China west of Hong Kong in about 48 hours.  It will likely be a tropical storm at that time.

Tropical Storm Wipha Brings Wind and Rain to South China

Tropical Storm Wipha brought wind and rain to south China on Wednesday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Wipha was located at latitude 20.5°N and longitude 110.6°E which put it about 50 miles (80 km) southeast of Leizhou, China.  Wipha was moving toward the west-northwest at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 990 mb.

The circulation around Tropical Storm Wipha contained a large rainband in the southern half of the tropical storm and another large rainband in the northern half of the circulation.  The rainband in the southern half of Wipha brought wind and rain to Hainan Island.  The rainband in the northern part of the tropical storm brought wind and rain to south China including Hong Kong.  Persistent heavy rain was creating the potential for flash floods in parts of southern China.

Tropical Storm Wipha was moving around the southwestern part of a subtropical ridge over the Western North Pacific Ocean.  The ridge will steer Wipha toward the west-northwest during the next 24 to 36 hours.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Wipha will move close to the coast of south China and northeastern Vietnam.  Wipha will continue to bring gusty winds and drop locally heavy rain over those regions on Thursday.

Typhoon Yutu Brings Wind and Rain to Luzon

Typhoon Yutu brought wind and rain to Luzon on Monday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Typhoon Yutu was located at latitude 16.8°N and longitude 122.4°E which put it about 45 miles (75 km east of Ilagan, Philippines.  Yutu was moving toward the west at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 105 m.p.h. (170 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 125 m.p.h. (200 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 949 mb.

The center of Typhoon Yutu made landfall near Palanan Point on the northeast coast of Luzon late on Monday.  Yutu had a large circulation.  Winds to typhoon force extended out about 80 miles (130 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 270 miles (435 km) from the center.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Yutu was 17.8.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 25.5 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 43.3.  Typhoon Yutu is capable of causing widespread serious damage.

Typhoon Yutu could cause a storm surge of up to 10 feet (3 meters) on the northeast coast of Luzon.  It will also produce destructive winds as it moves across northern Luzon.  Yutu will move westward across Luzon.  It will move into the South China Sea south of Vigan, Philippines.  Typhoon Yutu will drop very heavy rain over parts of northern Luzon and flash flooding will be very likely.  Rapid runoff into the Cagayan River could cause it to flood.

Typhoon Yutu will move over the Sierra Madre mountains and the Cordillera Central when it moves across northern Luzon.  Those two mountain ranges will disrupt the lower levels of the circulation and Yutu will be weaker when it reaches the South China Sea.  Yutu could still be a typhoon when it moves back over water, but it may weaken to a tropical storm by then.

Typhoon Yutu will move around the western end of a ridge of high pressure over the Western North Pacific Ocean when it reaches the South China Sea.  Yutu will move toward the north when it reaches the western end of the ridge and it could approach China in four or five days.

Powerful Typhoon Yutu Threatens Northern Luzon

Powerful Typhoon Yutu continued to pose a threat to northern Luzon on Saturday.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Typhoon Yutu was located at latitude 18.0°N and longitude 129.6°E which put it about 475 miles (765 km) east of Cape Engano, Philippines.  Yutu was moving toward the west at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 150 m.p.h. (240 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 185 m.p.h. (295 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 929 mb.

There were minor fluctuations in its intensity on Saturday, but Typhoon Yutu remains a very powerful tropical cyclone.  A circular eye is at the center of circulation.  The eye is surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds are occurring in that ring of storms.  Several bands of showers and thunderstorms are revolving around the core of Typhoon Yutu.  Storms around the core are generating strong upper level divergence which is pumping mass away from the typhoon in all directions.

Typhoon Yutu has a large circulation.  Winds to typhoon force extend out about 75 miles (120 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extend out about 250 miles (400 km) from the center.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Yutu is 31.6.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) is 28.3 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) is 59.9.  Typhoon Yutu is capable of causing wide spread significant damage.

Typhoon Yutu will continue to move south of a ridge of high pressure over the Western North Pacific Ocean.  The ridge will steer Yutu in a generally westerly direction for another 36 to 48 hours.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Yutu will reach northern Luzon in about 36 to 42 hours.  Yutu will create a storm surge at the coast.  It will cause significant wind damage over northern Luzon.  Yutu will also drop locally heavy rain and cause flash floods over parts of northern Luzon.

Powerful Typhoon Yutu Churns Toward Northern Luzon

Powerful Typhoon Yutu churned toward northern Luzon on Friday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Typhoon Yutu was located at latitude 17.7°N and longitude 135.9°E which put it about 900 miles (1450 km) east of Cape Engano, Philippines.  Yutu was moving toward the west-northwest at 17 m.p.h. (28 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 160 m.p.h. (260 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 195 m.p.h. (315 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 920 mb.

After completing an eyewall replacement cycle Typhoon Yutu strengthened again on Friday.  Yutu is once again the equivalent of a Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale.  The eyewall replacement cycle also caused an increase in the size of Typhoon Yutu’s circulation.  Winds to typhoon force extend out about 80 miles (130 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extend out about 260 miles (420 km) from the center.  The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) is 35.0.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) is 28.9 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) is 63.9.

Typhoon Yutu has a large, very well organized circulation and it will remain in an environment capable of supporting a powerful typhoon for several more days.  Yutu will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 31°C.  It will move through an area where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Typhoon Yutu could strengthen a little more during the next 12 to 24 hours.  At some point another rainband is likely to wrap around the existing eye and eyewall, and another eyewall replacement cycle could occur.  If there is another eyewall replacement cycle, then Yutu would weaken, at least temporarily.

Typhoon Yutu will move south of a ridge of high pressure over the Western North Pacific Ocean.  The ridge will steer Yutu in a generally westward direction.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Yutu could reach northern Luzon in about four days.  Yutu is very likely to be a strong typhoon when it approaches Luzon.