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Typhoon Chanthu Moves Away from Taiwan

Typhoon Chanthu moved away from Taiwan on Sunday. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Typhoon Chanthu was located at latitude 26.8°N and longitude 122.7°E which put it about 105 miles (165 km) northeast of Taipei, Taiwan. Chanthu was moving toward the north-northeast at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 110 m.p.h. (175 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 130 m.p.h. (210 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 965 mb.

Typhoon Chanthu moved away from Taiwan on Sunday and the weather conditions were improving there. The core of Chanthu passed east of Taiwan and so it remained intact. A small circular eye was present at the center of Typhoon Chanthu. The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Multiple bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Chanthu. Storms near the core generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away to the north of the typhoon.

The overall circulation of Typhoon Chanthu was larger after it moved past Taiwan. Winds to typhoon force extended out 25 miles (40 km) from the center of Chanthu. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 190 miles (305 km) from the center of circulation. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Chanthu was 19.2. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 10.7 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 29.9. Typhoon Chanthu was capable of causing regional serious damage.

Typhoon Chanthu will move through an environment that will be mostly unfavorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. Chanthu will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29˚C. An upper level trough over eastern China will produce southwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of Chanthu’s circulation. Those winds will cause moderate vertical wind shear. The wind shear will likely be strong enough to cause Typhoon Chanthu to weaken gradually.

Typhoon Chanthu will move around the western side of a subtropical high pressure system over the Western North Pacific Ocean. The high will steer Chanthu toward the north during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track Typhoon Chantu will continue to move away from Taiwan. Chanthu could approach the coast of Chine south of Shanghai in 24 hours. Typhoon Chanthu will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to the parts of east coast of China on Monday.

Elsewhere over the Western North Pacific Ocean, Tropical Depression Conson weakened near the coast of Vietnam. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Tropical Depression Conson was located at latitude 15.4°N and longitude 109.1°E which put it about 70 miles (110 km) southeast of Da Nang, Vietnam. Conson was stationary. The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1003 mb.

Typhoon Chanthu Brings Wind and Rain to Taiwan

Typhoon Chanthu brought wind and rain to Taiwan on Saturday morning. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Typhoon Chanthu was located at latitude 22.2°N and longitude 121.8°E which put it about 100 miles (160 km) south-southeast of Hualien, Taiwan. Chanthu was moving toward the north-northeast at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 140 m.p.h. (225 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 165 m.p.h. (270 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 938 mb.

Bands in the northwestern part of Typhoon Chanthu brought wind and rain to eastern Taiwan on Saturday morning. Typhoon Chanthu appeared to be in the middle of another eyewall replacement cycle. A small eye was present at the center of Chanthu. The eye was surrounded by concentric eyewalls. The strongest winds were occurring in the innermost eyewall. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Typhoon Chanthu. Storms near the core generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the typhoon.

The current eyewall replacement cycle increased the overall size of the circulation around Typhoon Chanthu. Winds to typhoon force extended out 35 miles (55 km) from the center of Chanthu. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 150 miles (240 km) from the center of circulation. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Chanthu was 28.3. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 12.5 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 40.8. Typhoon Chanthu was capable of causing regional severe damage.

Typhoon Chanthu will move over water capable of supporting an intense typhoon during the next 24 hours. Chanthu will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30˚C. It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear. The current eyewall replacement cycle could cause Typhoon Chanthu to weaken if the innermost eyewall dissipates.

Typhoon Chanthu will move around the western end of a high pressure system over the Western North Pacific. The high pressure system will steer Chanthu toward the north during the next 36 hours. On its anticipated track the center of Typhoon Chanthu will be near northeastern Taiwan in 18 hours. Typhoon Chanthu will drop very heavy rain over eastern Taiwan. The risk of flash floods is very high. Even though the core of Chanthu may pass just east of Taiwan, strong winds are likely to cause damage along the east coast of Taiwan.

Elsewhere over the Western North Pacific Ocean, Tropical Storm Conson was approaching toward central Vietnam. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Conson was located at latitude 15.4°N and longitude 109.0°E which put it about 65 miles (105 km) southeast of Da Nang, Vietnam. Conson was moving toward the west-southwest at 5 m.p.h. (8 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 997 mb.

Typhoon Chanthu Brings Wind and Rain to Northeast Luzon

Typhoon Chanthu brought wind and rain to northeastern Luzon on Friday. At 5:00 a.m. EDT on Friday the center of Typhoon Chanthu was located at latitude 18.3°N and longitude 123.1°E which put it about 100 miles (160 km) east of Aparri, Philippines. Chanthu was moving toward the northwest at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 165 m.p.h. (265 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 200 m.p.h. (320 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 915 mb.

Even though the center of Typhoon Chanthu was passing northeast of northeastern Luzon, bands on the western side of Chanthu brought gusty wind and heavy rain to northeastern Luzon. Typhoon Chanthu strengthened back to the equivalent of a Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale after it completed an eyewall replacement cycle on Thursday. A circular eye was present at the center of Chanthu. The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Storms near the core of Chanthu generated strong upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the typhoon in all directions.

The circulation around Typhoon Chanthu was relatively small. Winds to typhoon force extended out 45 miles (75 km) from the center of Chanthu. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 90 miles (145 km) from the center of circulation. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Chanthu was 36.8. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 14.1 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 50.9. Typhoon Chanthu was capable of causing regional catastrophic damage.

Typhoon Chanthu will move over water capable of supporting an intense typhoon during the next 24 hours. Chanthu will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30˚C. It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear. If the inner end of a rainband wraps around the existing eye and eyewall, another eyewall replacement cycle could start. If another eyewall replacement cycle occurs, Typhoon Chanthu would weaken, but the size of the circulation would increase.

Typhoon Chanthu will move around the western end of a high pressure system during the next few days. The high pressure system will steer Chanthu toward the northwest during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track Typhoon Chanthu will gradually move away from northeastern Luzon. Chantu will approach southern Taiwan in 24 hours. Typhoon Chanthu will bring very strong winds and heavy rain to Taiwan. Widespread flash floods could occur.

Elsewhere over the Western North Pacific Ocean, Tropical Storm Conson moved toward central Vietnam. At 5:00 a.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Conson was located at latitude 15.6°N and longitude 111.7°E which put it about 250 miles (400 km) east of Da Nang, Vietnam. Conson was moving toward the west at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 997 mb.

Dangerous Typhoon Chanthu Nears Northeast Luzon

Dangerous Typhoon Chanthu neared northeastern Luzon on Thursday night. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Typhoon Chanthu was located at latitude 17.5°N and longitude 123.7°E which put it about 135 miles (215 km) southeast of Aparri, Philippines. Chanthu was moving toward the west-northwest at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 150 m.p.h. (240 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 185 m.p.h. (295 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 925 mb.

Typhoon Chanthu completed an eyewall replacement cycle on Thursday and Chanthu was strengthening again. The original eye and eyewall were almost entirely dissipated. A new, slightly larger eye was visible at the center of Typhoon Chanthu on satellite images. The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Chanthu. Storms near the core generated strong upper level divergence that pumped large quantities of mass away from the typhoon.

Although the eyewall replacement cycle increased the size of the core of Typhoon Chanthu, the total circulation around Chanthu was relative small. Winds to typhoon force extended out 45 miles (75 km) from the center of Chanthu. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 90 miles (145 km) from the center of circulation. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Chanthu was 31.6. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 13.7 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 45.3. Typhoon Chanthu was capable of causing regional severe damage.

Typhoon Chanthu will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 12 hours. Chanthu will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30˚C. It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear. Typhoon Chanthu could strengthen during the next 12 hours. Chanthu will weaken if the core of the typhoon moves over northeastern Luzon. If the core of Typhoon Chanthu passes northeast of Luzon, then it could maintain its intensity during the next 36 hours.

Typhoon Chanthu will move around the western end of a high pressure system during the next few days. The high pressure system will steer Chanthu toward the northwest during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track the core of Typhoon Chanthu will pass very close to northeastern Luzon. Chanthu could cause severe damage to northeastern Luzon. Typhoon Chantu will bring very strong winds and locally heavy rain. Heavy rain is likely to cause flash floods. Typhoon Chantu could affect Taiwan during the weekend.

Elsewhere over the Western North Pacific Ocean, Tropical Storm Conson moved toward central Vietnam. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Conson was located at latitude 15.8°N and longitude 112.2°E which put it about 280 miles (460 km) east of Da Nang, Vietnam. Conson was moving toward the west-southwest at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 994 mb.

Typhoon Vamco Strengthens to Equivalent of Major Hurricane

Typhoon Vamco strengthened to the equivalent of a major hurricane east of Vietnam on Friday. At 4:00 p.m. EST on Friday the center of Typhoon Vamco was located at latitude 15.7°N and longitude 111.9°E which put it about 275 miles (440 km) east of Da Nang, Vietnam. Vamco was moving toward the west at 12 m.p.h. (19 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 130 m.p.h. (210 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 160 m.p.h. (260 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 954 mb.

Typhoon Vamco rapidly intensified into the equivalent of a major hurricane over the East China east of Vietnam on Friday. The circulation contracted around a small clear eye. The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Typhoon Vamco. Storms near the core were generating strong upper level divergence which was pumping mass away fro the typhoon. The removal of mass allowed the pressure to decrease rapidly which contributed to the rabid intensification.

Winds to typhoon force extended out 40 miles (65 km) from the center of Typhoon Vamco. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 200 miles (320 km) from the center of circulation. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Vamco was 25.1. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 16.7 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 41.8. Vamco was capable of causing significant damage.

Typhoon Vamco will move through an environment that will become less favorable for intensification during the next day or so. Vamco will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C. So, there will be enough energy in the upper ocean to support an intense typhoon. However, northeasterly winds will transport drier air over eastern Asia toward the western side of Typhoon Vamco. Vamco is likely to start to weaken when the drier air is pulled into the core of the circulation.

Typhoon Vamco will move south of a high pressure system over the eastern Asia. The high will steer Vamco toward the west during the next several days. On its anticipated track Typhoon Vamco will approach the coast of Vietnam north of Da Nang in about 24 hours. Vamco is likely to still be a typhoon when it reaches Vietnam. Typhoon Vamco will drop heavy rain over Vietnam, Laos and northeastern Thailand. The rain will fall on saturated surfaces and floods will occur in those areas.

Typhoon Vamco Moves Toward Vietnam

Typhoon Vamco moved toward Vietnam on Thursday. At 10:00 p.m. EST on Thursday the center of Typhoon Vamco was located at latitude 15.5°N and longitude 115.0°E which put it about 480 miles (775 km) east of Da Nang, Vietnam. Vamco was moving toward the west-northwest at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 105 m.p.h. (165 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 972 mb.

One day after causing widespread damage on Luzon, Typhoon Vamco moved across the South China Sea toward Vietnam. An eye was present at the center of Vamco, but there were clouds in the eye. The eye was surrounded by a broken ring of thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Typhoon Vamco. The size of the circulation around Vamco increased after it crossed Luzon. Winds to typhoon force extended out 75 miles (120 km) from the center of circulation. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 230 miles (370 km) from the center.

Typhoon Vamco will move through an environment that could allow it to maintain its intensity for another 24 to 36 hours. Vamco will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C. It will move under the southern portion of an upper level ridge over eastern Asia. The ridge will produce easterly winds which will blow toward the top of the Typhoon Vamco. Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear, but the shear will not be too strong. Northeasterly winds will transport drier air toward the western side of Typhoon Vamco when it moves closer to land in 24 to 36 hours. Vamco could start to weaken if the drier air is pulled into the core of the typhoon.

Typhoon Vamco will move south of a high pressure system over the eastern Asia. The high will steer Vamco toward the west-northwest during the next several days. On its anticipated track Typhoon Vamco will approach the center coast of Vietnam in about 36 hours.

Typhoon Molave Intensifies to Equivalent of a Major Hurricane

Typhoon Molave intensified to the equivalent of a major hurricane east of Vietnam on Monday night. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Typhoon Molave was located at latitude 13.4°N and longitude 114.1°E which put it about 465 miles (750 km) east-southeast of Da Nang, Vietnam. Molave was moving toward the west at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 115 m.p.h. (185 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 145 m.p.h. (235 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 952 mb.

Typhoon Molave intensified steadily on Monday and it strengthened into the equivalent of a major hurricane over the South China Sea east of Vietnam. An eye appeared at the center of Typhoon Molave intermittently on satellite images. The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Molave. Storms near the core generated upper level divergence which pumped mass away from the typhoon.

The circulation around Typhoon Molave increased in size on Monday. Winds to typhoon force extended out 60 miles (95 km) from the center of Molave. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 190 miles (305 km) from the center of circulation. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Typhoon Molave was 20.6. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 20.3 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 40.9. Typhoon Molave was capable of causing major damage.

Typhoon Molave will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 12 hours. Molave will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C. It will move under the southern part of an upper level ridge. The ridge will produce easterly winds which will cause some vertical wind shear. The wind shear will limit the intensification during the next 12 hours. The upper level easterly winds could get stronger later on Tuesday. Stronger winds would cause more vertical wind shear which could cause Molave to start to weaken.

Typhoon Molave will move south of a high pressure system over eastern Asia. The high will steer Molave toward the west. On its anticipated track Typhoon Molave will approach the coast of Vietnam near Quy Nhon in about 24 hours. Molave will be capable of causing serious wind damage when it makes landfall. Wind blowing water toward the coast could cause a storm surge of up to 10 feet (3 meters) along the coast of central Vietnam. Typhoon Molave will drop locally heavy rain over central Vietnam, southern Laos, northern Cambodia and northeastern Thailand. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some of those places.

Saudel Strengthens to a Typhoon over South China Sea

Former Tropical Storm Saudel strengthened to a typhoon over the South China Sea on Wednesday night. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Hurricane Saudel was located at latitude 17.1°N and longitude 116.0°E which put it about 515 miles (830 km) east of Da Nang, Vietnam. Saudel was moving toward the northwest at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 979 mb.

Former Tropical Storm Saudel intensified after the circulation moved over the South China Sea west of Luzon. Satellite imagery provided indications that a small circular eye might be forming at the center of circulation. The inner end of a rainband was wrapping around the potential eye and the strongest winds were occurring in that rainband. Other bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Typhoon Saudel. Storms near the core generated upper level divergence which pumped mass away from the typhoon. Winds to typhoon force extended out 40 miles (65 km) from the center of Saudel. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 175 miles (280 km) from the center.

Typhoon Saudel will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 24 to 36 hours.  Saudel will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  It will be in a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Typhoon Saudel will intensify during the next day or so. After that time an upper level ridge over eastern Asia will generate easterly winds which blow toward the top of Saudel’s circulation during the weekend. Those winds will cause more vertical wind shear, which could cause Saudel to weaken.

Typhoon Saudel will move south of a ridge of high pressure over eastern Asia.  The ridge will steer Saudel toward the west during the next several days.  On its anticipated track Typhoon Saudel will approach Hainan Island in about 48 hours. Saudel could approach the coast of Vietnam in about 72 hours.

Tropical Storm Linfa Makes Landfall in Vietnam

Tropical Storm Linfa made landfall on the coast of Vietnam on Sunday.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Tropical Storm Linfa was located at latitude 15.4°N and longitude 107.4°E which put it about 50 miles (80 km) east of Lamam, Laos.  Linfa was moving toward the west at 6 m.p.h. (10 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1000 mb.

The center of Tropical Storm Linfa made landfall on the central coast of Vietnam south of Da Nang on Sunday.  Linfa brought tropical storm force winds to the portion of the coast south of Da Nang.  Tropical Storm Linfa dropped heavy rain over central Vietnam, southern Laos and northeastern Cambodia.  Linfa is forecast to continue to move toward the west and it will be over northeastern Thailand on Monday.

Elsewhere over the Western North Pacific Ocean, Tropical Storm Chan-hom weakened southeast of Japan and a new tropical depression formed west of the Philippines.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Tropical Storm Chan-hom was located at latitude 31.1°N and longitude 142.2°E which put it about 300 miles (485 km) south-southeast of Tokyo, Japan.  Chan-hom was moving toward the southeast at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1000 mb.

At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Tropical Depression 18W was located at latitude 17.1°N and longitude 118.3°E which put it about 700 miles (1130 km) east of Da Nang, Vietnam.  The depression was moving toward the west at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb.

Tropical Storm Linfa Forms East of Vietnam

Tropical Storm Linfa formed east of Vietnam on Saturday.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Linfa was located at latitude 15.0°N and longitude 109.9°E which put it about 155 miles (250 km) east-southeast of Da Nang, Vietnam.  Linfa was moving toward the west at 21 m.p.h. (34 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 997 mb.

More thunderstorms developed near the center of a low pressure system over the South China Sea east of Vietnam and the Japan Meteorological Agency designated the system as Tropical Storm Linfa on Saturday.  The circulation around Tropical Storm Linfa exhbited better organization.  More thunderstorms formed near the center of circulation.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the center of Linfa.  Storms near the center generated upper level divergence which pumped mass away to the west of the tropical storm.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 100 miles (160 km) from the center of Linfa.

A high pressure system over eastern Asia will steer Tropical Storm Linfa quickly toward the west during the next two days.  On its anticipated track Linfa will make landfall on the coast of Vietnam south of Da Nang in about 8 hours.  Tropical Storm Linfa will move through an environment favorable for intensification until it makes landfall.  Linfa will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C.  It will move under the southern part of an upper level ridge.  The ridge will produce easterly winds which will blow toward the top of Tropical Storm Linfa.  Those winds will cause moderate vertical wind shear.  The shear will limit the rate of intensification but Linfa will strengthen before it makes landfall.

Tropical Storm Linfa will make landfall on the coast of Vietnam south of Da Nang in a few hours.  Linfa will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to parts of central Vietnam, southern Laos, northern Cambodia and northeastern Thailand.  Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations.

Elsewhere over the Western North Pacific Ocean, Tropical Storm Chan-hom was passing south of Japan.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Chan-hom was located at latitude 32.0°N and longitude 139.8°E which put it about 215 miles (345 km) south of Tokyo, Japan.  Chan-hom was moving toward the east at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 985 mb.