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Hurricane Larry Brings Wind and Rain to Newfoundland

Hurricane Larry brought wind and rain to Newfoundland on Friday night. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Hurricane Larry was located at latitude 46.8°N and longitude 54.9°W which put it about 85 miles (135 km) west of Cape Race, Newfoundland. Larry was moving toward the north-northeast at 47 m.p.h. (76 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 95 m.p.h. (150 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 958 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Arnold’s Cove to Jones Harbour, Newfoundland. The Hurricane Warning included St. John’s. Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the portions of the coast from Francios to Arnold’s Cove and from Jones Harbour to Fogo Island, Newfoundland.

Hurricane Larry brought strong winds and heavy rain to southeastern Newfoundland on Friday night. Larry was a large hurricane. Winds to hurricane force extended out 100 miles (160 km) on the eastern side of Larry. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 250 miles (400 km) from the center of Hurricane Larry. Rain was falling from Marystown to Bonavista. St. John’s International Airport was reporting heavy rain with a sustained wind speed of 42 m.p.h. (68 km/h) and wind gusts to 58 m.p.h. (94 km/h).

Hurricane Larry will move quickly across southeastern Newfoundland. Larry will make a transition to an extratropical cyclone over the Labrador Sea. The extratropical cyclone could bring heavy precipitation to parts of Greenland on Sunday.

Hurricane Larry Races Toward Newfoundland

Hurricane Larry raced toward Newfoundland on Friday morning. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Hurricane Larry was located at latitude 40.0°N and longitude 60.5°W which put it about 595 miles (955 km) southwest of Cape Race, Newfoundland. Larry was moving toward the north-northeast at 29 m.p.h. (46 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 95 m.p.h. (150 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 971 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Arnold’s Cove to Jones Harbour, Newfoundland. The Hurricane Warning included St. John’s. Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the portions of the coast from Francios to Arnold’s Cove and from Jones Harbour to Fogo Island, Newfoundland.

The structure of Hurricane Larry changed as it raced toward the north-northeast. A rainband wrapped around the existing eye and eyewall and it appeared that concentric eyewalls may have formed. Microwave satellite imagery showed indications of a smaller inner eye inside a much larger outer eye. Drier air was being pulled into the circulation around Hurricane Larry. Zones of drier air with fewer clouds were beginning to appear between the rainbands.

The circulation around Hurricane Larry was large. Winds to hurricane force extended out 80 miles (130 km) from the center of Larry. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 240 miles (390 km) from the center of circulation. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Larry was 11.5. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 27.9 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 39.4. Hurricane Larry was about 60% of the size of Hurricane Sandy (2012).

Hurricane Larry will move through an environment that will allow Larry to maintain its intensity until it reaches Newfoundland. Larry will move over cooler water when it moves north of the Gulf Stream. An upper level trough over the eastern U.S. will produce southwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of Larry’s circulation. Those winds will cause moderate vertical wind shear. However, the southwesterly winds will also contribute to upper level divergence to the northeast of Hurricane Larry. Enhanced upper level divergence will allow the pressure at the surface to remain low. In addition, Hurricane Larry will begin to make a transformation to an extratropical cyclone when it nears Newfoundland.

The upper trough over the eastern U.S. will steer Hurricane Larry rapidly toward the northeast during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track Hurricane Larry will reach Newfoundland on Friday night. Larry will bring strong winds and locally heavy rain to southeast Newfoundland. Widespread power outages could occur. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations.

Hurricane Larry Passes East of Bermuda

Hurricane Larry passed east of Bermuda on Thursday afternoon. At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Hurricane Larry was located at latitude 32.9°N and longitude 62.0°W which put it about 170 miles (280 km) east-northeast of Bermuda. Larry was moving toward the north-northwest at 17 m.p.h. (28 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 105 m.p.h. (165 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 966 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for Bermuda. A Hurricane Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from St. Schotts to Pouch Cove, Newfoundland. Tropical Storm Watches were in effect for the portions of the coast from Lamaline to St, Schotts, Newfoundland and from Pouch Cove to Bonavista, Newfoundland.

The center of Hurricane Larry passed east of Bermuda on Friday afternoon. Bands on the western edge of Larry’s circulation brought rain and gusty winds to Bermuda. Hurricane Larry was still a well organized hurricane. A circular eye was present at the center of Larry. The eye was surrounded by a broken ring of thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the center of Hurricane Larry. Storms near the center of circulation generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away to the north of the hurricane.

The circulation around Hurricane Larry was large. Winds to hurricane force extended out 90 miles (145 km) from the center of Larry. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 220 miles (350 km) from the center of circulation. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Hurricane Larry was 13.9. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 25.4 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 39.3.

Hurricane Larry will move through an environment that should allow it to maintain its intensity during the next 24 hours. Larry will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28˚C. It will move around the eastern side of an upper level trough over the eastern U.S. The trough will produce southwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of Larry’s circulation. Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear. However, the winds in the lower levels will also blow from the southwest. So, there will not be a lot of vertical wind shear. Hurricane Larry will move over cooler water when it moves north of the Gulf Stream on Friday. Larry will begin to make a transition to an extratropical cyclone when it gets north of the Gulf Stream.

The upper level trough over the eastern U.S. will steer Hurricane Larry toward the northeast. On its anticipated track Larry will move quickly away from Bermuda. Hurricane Larry could reach southeastern Newfoundland on Friday night. Larry will bring strong winds and locally heavy rain to parts of Newfoundland.

Elsewhere, former Tropical Storm Mindy dropped locally heavy rain over the southeast coast of the U.S. on Thursday morning. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Depression Mindy was located at latitude 31.5°N and longitude 80.7°W which put it about 45 miles (75 km) south-southeast of Savannah, Georgia. Mindy was moving toward the east-northeast at 21 m.p.h. (33 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1005 mb.

Tropical Storm Mindy Forms near Florida Panhandle

Tropical Storm Mindy formed near the Florida Panhandle on Wednesday afternoon. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Mindy was located at latitude 29.0°N and longitude 86.3°W which put it about 90 miles (145 km) west-southwest of Apalachicola, Florida. Mindy was moving toward the northeast at 21 m.p.h. (33 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1008 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was issued for the portion of the coast from Mexico Beach to the Steinhatchee River, Florida.

A surface low pressure system spun up quickly near the Florida Panhandle on Wednesday afternoon and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Storm Mindy. More thunderstorms were forming near the center of Mindy. Storms near the center started to generate upper level divergence that pumped mass away to the northeast of the tropical storm. The removal of mass caused the surface pressure to decrease. NOAA buoy 42039 reported a sustained wind speed of 38 m.p.h. (61 km/h) and a wind gust of 51 m.p.h. (83 km/h) at 4:40 p.m. EDT. The buoy also reported a surface pressure of 1007.8 mb.

Tropical Storm Mindy could strengthen a little during the next few hours before it makes landfall on the coast of Northwest Florida. Mindy will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30˚C. It will move under the eastern side of an upper level low over the western Gulf of Mexico. The upper low will produce southwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of Mindy’s circulation. Those winds will cause moderate vertical wind shear and the shear will limit potential intensification.

The upper level low will steer Tropical Storm Mindy quickly toward the northeast during the next 12 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Mindy will make landfall on the coast near Port St. Joe, Florida on Wednesday evening. Mindy will move more toward the east-northeast on Thursday when it reaches the westerly winds in the middle latitudes. Tropical Storm Mindy will produce gusty winds along the coast of Northwest Florida. Mindy could drop locally heavy rain over parts of northern Florida and southern Georgia. Flash Flood Watches are in effect for parts of northern Florida. Southerly winds on the eastern side of Tropical Storm Mindy will push waves toward the coast and some beach erosion is likely.

Elsewhere, Hurricane Larry moved closer to Bermuda on Wednesday afternoon. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Hurricane Larry was located at latitude 28.9°N and longitude 59.2°W which put it about 405 miles (655 km) southeast of Bermuda. Larry was moving toward the northwest at 15 m.p.h. (24 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 110 m.p.h. (175 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 130 m.p.h. (210 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 966 mb. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for Bermuda.

Bermuda Issues Tropical Storm Watch for Potential Effects of Hurricane Larry

Bermuda issued a Tropical Storm Watch on Tuesday because of the potential effects of Hurricane Larry. At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Hurricane Larry was located at latitude 24.8°N and longitude 55.8°W which put it about 750 miles (1210 km) southeast of Bermuda. Larry was moving toward the northwest at 9 m.p.h. (13 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 115 m.p.h. (185 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 135 m.p.h. (225 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 967 mb.

A Tropical Storm Watch was issued for Bermuda.

Hurricane Larry remained a large, powerful hurricane even though it was slowly weakening. A large eye with a diameter of 60 miles (95 km) was at the center of Larry. The eye was surrounded by a broken ring of thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Winds to hurricane force extended out 60 miles (95 km) from the center of Larry. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 165 miles (265 km) from the center of circulation. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Hurricane Larry was 20.6. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 22.4 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 43.0.

Hurricane Larry will move through an environment that is slightly unfavorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. The large circulation around Larry seems to have mixed cooler water to the surface of the Atlantic Ocean. Since the circulation is so large, when the winds mix cooler water on the northern side of Hurricane Larry eventually the core of the hurricane will move over that cooler water. Larry will likely be unable to extract enough energy from the ocean to maintain its full circulation. Hurricane Larry will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there is little vertical wind shear. Since there will be little vertical wind shear, Hurricane Larry is likely to weaken gradually.

Hurricane Larry will move around the western end of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean. The high will steer Larry toward the northwest during the next 36 hours. On its anticipated track the center of Hurricane Larry will pass east of Bermuda on Thursday. The western side of Larry could bring tropical storm force winds to Bermuda.

Hurricane Larry Spins Southeast of Bermuda

Hurricane Larry was spinning southeast of Bermuda on Sunday afternoon. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Hurricane Larry was located at latitude 20.5°N and longitude 50.6°W which put it about 1195 miles (1925 km) southeast of Bermuda. Larry was moving toward the northwest at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 125 m.p.h. (200 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 145 m.p.h. (235 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 955 mb.

The circulation around Hurricane Larry continued to be symmetrical. A large eye was present at the center of Larry. A ring of strong thunderstorms surrounded the eye and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hurricane Larry. Storms near the core generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the hurricane. The circulation around Larry was nearly in balance with the environment around the hurricane. The upper level divergence was pumping out as much mass as was being brought into Hurricane Larry by convergence in the lower levels. So, the minimum surface pressure was remaining nearly constant.

The circulation around Hurricane Larry increased in size. Winds to hurricane force extended out 45 miles (75 km) from the center of Larry. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 160 miles (260 km) from the center of circulation. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Hurricane Larry was 23.6. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 16.3 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 39.9.

Hurricane Larry is likely to remain nearly in balance with its environment during the next 36 hours. Larry will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28˚C. It will move around the eastern side of an upper level trough north of Puerto Rico. The upper level trough will produce southwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of Larry’s circulation. Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear, but the shear will not have a significant impact on Larry’s circulation. Hurricane Larry is likely to maintain its intensity during the next 36 hours.

Hurricane Larry will move around the southwestern side of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean during the next 36 hours. The high pressure system will steer Larry toward the northwest during that time period. On its anticipated track Hurricane Larry will move in the general direction of Bermuda.

Hurricane Larry Intensifies to a Major Hurricane

Hurricane Larry intensified to a major hurricane on Friday evening. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Hurricane Larry was located at latitude 15.5°N and longitude 43.3°W which put it about 1230 miles (1980 km) east of the Leeward Islands. Larry was moving toward the west-northwest at 16 m.p.h. (26 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 115 m.p.h. (185 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 135 m.p.h. (220 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 965 mb.

Hurricane Larry continued to intensify on Friday evening and the wind speed increased to that of a major hurricane. An eye with a diameter of 17 miles (28 km) was at the center of Hurricane Larry. The eye was surround be a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hurricane Larry. Storms near the core generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the hurricane in all directions. The removal of mass was causing the surface pressure to decrease.

The circulation around Hurricane Larry was becoming more symmetrical. Winds to hurricane force extended out 35 miles (55 km) from the center of Larry. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 150 miles (240 km) from the center of circulation. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Hurricane Larry was 20.6. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 12.5 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 33.1.

Hurricane Larry will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. Larry will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28˚C. It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear. Hurricane Larry will continue to intensify during the next 36 hours. Larry is likely to strengthen to Category 4 on the Saffir-Simpson Scale during the weekend.

Hurricane Larry will move around the southern side of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean during the next 36 hours. The high will steer Larry toward the west-northwest during that time period. On its anticipated track Hurricane Larry will move in the general direction of Bermuda.

Hurricane Larry Strengthens to Cat. 2

Hurricane Larry strengthened to Category 2 over the Atlantic Ocean on Friday afternoon. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Hurricane Larry was located at latitude 15.0°N and longitude 42.0°W which put it about 1320 miles (2125 km) east of the Leeward Islands. Larry was moving toward the west-northwest at 16 m.p.h. (26 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 120 m.p.h. (195 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 978 mb.

Hurricane Larry intensified to Category 2 on Friday afternoon. A small circular eye was present at the center of Larry. The eye was surround be a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hurricane Larry. Storms near the core generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the hurricane. Winds to hurricane force extended out 35 miles (55 km) from the center of Larry. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 150 miles (240 km) from the center of circulation.

Hurricane Larry will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. Larry will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28˚C. It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear. Hurricane Larry will intensify during the next 36 hours. Larry is likely to strengthen to a major hurricane during the weekend.

Hurricane Larry will move around the southern side of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean during the next 36 hours. The high will steer Larry toward the west-northwest during that time period. On it anticipated track Hurricane Larry will move in the general direction of Bermuda.

Larry Strengthens to a Hurricane

Former Tropical Storm Larry strengthened to a hurricane over the eastern Atlantic Ocean early on Thursday. At 5:00 a.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Hurricane Larry was located at latitude 13.0°N and longitude 32.3°W which put it about 545 miles (875 km) west-southwest of the Cabo Verde Islands. Larry was moving toward the west at 20 m.p.h. (32 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 987 mb.

Former Tropical Storm Larry intensified quickly during the past 24 hours and it reached hurricane intensity early on Thursday morning. The inner end of a rainband wrapped around the center of Hurricane Larry and an eye appeared intermittently on visible and microwave satellite images. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the center of Larry. Storms near the center generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away to the west of the hurricane. Winds to hurricane force extended out 20 miles (30 km) from the center of Larry. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 80 miles (130 km) from the center of circulation.

Hurricane Larry will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next several days. Larry will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 27.5˚C. It will move under the southern side of an upper level ridge over the eastern Atlantic Ocean. The ridge will produce easterly winds that will blow toward the top of Larry’s circulation. Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear. The winds in the lower levels will also blow from the east and so there will not be a lot of vertical wind shear. Hurricane Larry will strengthen during the next 48 hours and it could intensify to a major hurricane. Hurricane could undergo a period of rapid intensification once an inner core with an eye and an eyewall are fully formed.

Hurricane Larry will move around the southern side of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean. The high will steer Larry toward the west during the next several days. On its anticipated track Hurricane Larry will move farther away from the Cabo Verde islands. Larry could be east of the northern Leeward Islands by the weekend.

Elsewhere, the remnants of former Hurricane Ida interacted with a slow moving cold front to cause widespread urban and flash floods in the northeastern U.S. At 5:00 a.m. EDT on Thursday the center of the remnants of former Hurricane Ida was located at latitude 41.4°N and longitude 71.6°W which put it about 40 miles (65 km) southwest of Providence, Rhode Island. Ida was moving toward the northeast at 28 m.p.h. (43 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 998 mb. There were reports of urban and flash floods in central and eastern Pennsylvania, northern New Jersey and southeastern New York including New York City. There were reports of tornadoes in Maryland and New Jersey.

Tropical Storm Larry Forms South of Cabo Verde Islands

Tropical Storm Larry formed south of the Cabo Verde Islands on Wednesday morning. At 5:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Larry was located at latitude 12.3°N and longitude 24.8°W which put it about 175 miles (280 km) south of the Cabo Verde Islands. Larry was moving toward the west at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1003 mb.

Satellite images indicated that former Tropical Depression Twelve had strengthened on Wednesday morning and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Storm Larry. The circulation around Tropical Storm Larry exhibited more organization. More thunderstorms formed near the center of Larry. Even though the circulation was more organized, the distribution of thunderstorms was asymmetrical. Many of the thunderstorms were occurring in bands south and west of the center of Tropical Storm Larry. Bands in the northern and eastern parts of Larry consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. Storms near the center of circulation began to generate upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the tropical storm. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 70 miles (110 km) on the western side of Larry. The winds on the eastern side of the circulation were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Larry will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next few days. Larry will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 27.5˚C. It will move under the southern side of an upper level ridge over the eastern Atlantic Ocean. The ridge will produce easterly winds that will blow toward the top of Larry’s circulation. Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear. The winds in the lower levels will also blow from the east and so there will not be a lot of vertical wind shear. Tropical Storm Larry will strengthen during the next few days. Larry could intensify to a hurricane within 36 hours. Tropical Storm Larry could undergo a period of rapid intensification once an inner core with an eye and an eyewall form. Larry could intensify to a major hurricane during the weekend.

Tropical Storm Larry will move around the southern side of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean. The high will steer Larry toward the west during the next several days. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Larry will move farther away from the Cabo Verde islands. Larry could be east of the northern Leeward Islands by the weekend.

Elsewhere, Tropical Depression Ida was dropping locally heavy rain over parts of the U.S. and Tropical Depression Kate was spinning northeast of the Leeward Islands. At 5:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Depression Ida was located at latitude 37.3°N and longitude 82.5°W which put it about 75 miles (120 km) west of Bluefield, West Virginia. Ida was moving toward the northeast at 24 m.p.h. (39 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 30 m.p.h. (50 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1000 mb. Flash Flood Watches were in effect for the region from West Virginia and eastern Ohio to southern New England.

At 5:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday the center of Tropical Depression Kate was located at latitude 25.7°N and longitude 51.7°W which put it about 895 miles (1440 km) northeast of the northern Leeward Islands. Kate was moving toward the north-northwest at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1007 mb.