Tag Archives: Puerto Rico

Powerful Hurricane Beryl Moves Toward Jamaica

Powerful Hurricane Beryl moved over the Caribbean Sea toward Jamaica on Tuesday morning.  At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Hurricane Beryl was located at latitude 15.3°N and longitude 68.9°W which put the center about 555 miles (895 km) east-southeast of Kingston, Jamaica.   Beryl was moving toward the west-northwest at 22 m.p.h. (35 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 160 m.p.h. (260 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 190 m.p.h. (305 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 938 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for Jamaica.

Hurricane Watches were in effect for Grand Cayman, Little Cayman and Cayman Brac.  A Hurricane Watch was also in effect for the South coast of Haiti from Anse d’Hainault to the border with the Dominican Republic.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the south coast of the Dominican Republic from Punta Palenque to the border with Haiti.  A Tropical Storm Warning was also in effect for the south coast of Haiti from Anse d’Hainault to the border with the Dominican Republic.

U.S. Air Force Reserve and NOAA aircraft determined that Hurricane Beryl was still a Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale on Tuesday morning.  A circular eye with a diameter of 12 miles (19 km) was present at the center of Beryl’s circulation.  The eye was surrounded by a ring of thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hurricane Beryl.  Storms near the core generated strong upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the hurricane in all directions.  The removal of large amounts of mass was nearly equal to the inflow of mass in the lower levels of the atmosphere.  The equilibrium between upper level divergence and lower level convergence caused the surface pressure to remain nearly steady.

The size of the circulation around Hurricane Beryl increased on Tuesday morning.  Winds to hurricane force extended out 40 miles (65 km) from the center of Beryl’s circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 170 miles (280 km) from the center of Hurricane Beryl.

The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Hurricane Beryl was 35.0.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 13.7 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 48.7.  Hurricane Beryl was similar in size and intensity to Hurricane Michael when Michael hit Northwest Florida in 2018.

Hurricane Beryl will move through an environment that will become less favorable for a powerful hurricane during the next 24 hours.  Beryl will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29°C.  It will move closer to an upper level trough over Northwestern Caribbean Sea.  The upper level trough will produce southwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of Beryl’s circulation.  Those winds will cause the vertical wind shear to increase.  Hurricane Beryl will start to weaken when the wind shear increases.

Hurricane Beryl will move around the southern side of a high pressure system over the western Atlantic Ocean.  The high pressure system will steer Beryl toward the west-northwest during the next 24 hours.  On its anticipated track, Hurricane Beryl will move toward Jamaica.  The core of Beryl’s could reach Jamaica by late Wednesday morning.

Hurricane Beryl is likely to be a major hurricane when it reaches Jamaica.  Beryl will be capable of causing regional major damage.  Widespread electricity outages are likely.  Hurricane Beryl will also drop heavy rain on Jamaica.  Heavy rain is likely to cause flash floods.  Beryl could cause a storm surge of up to 13 feet (4 meters) where the wind blows the water toward the coast.

The circulation around the northern side of Hurricane Beryl will cause the water level to rise along the south coasts of Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and Haiti.  There are already reports of a storm surge along the south coast of Puerto Rico.

Hurricane Beryl Intensifies to Cat. 5

Hurricane Beryl intensified to Category 5 on the Saffir-Simpson Scale over the eastern Caribbean Sea on Monday evening.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Hurricane Beryl was located at latitude 13.8°N and longitude 64.9°W which put the center about 840 miles (1355 km) east-southeast of Kingston, Jamaica.  Beryl was moving toward the west-northwest at 22 m.p.h. (35 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 160 m.p.h. (260 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 190 m.p.h. (305 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 938 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for Jamaica.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the south coast of the Dominican Republic from Punta Palenque to the border with Haiti.  A Tropical Storm Warning was also in effect for the south coast of Haiti from Anse d’Hainault to the border with the Dominican Republic.

A NOAA research aircraft determined on Monday evening that Hurricane Beryl had intensified to a Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale.  A circular eye with a diameter of 17 miles (28 km) was present at the center of Beryl’s circulation.  The eye was surrounded by a ring of thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hurricane Beryl.  Storms near the core generated strong upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the hurricane in all directions.  The removal of large amounts of mass caused the surface pressure to continue to decrease.

The size of the circulation around Hurricane Beryl remained relatively constant during Monday evening.  Winds to hurricane force extended out 40 miles (65 km) from the center of Beryl’s circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 125 miles (200 km) from the center of Hurricane Beryl.

The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Hurricane Beryl was 35.0.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 12.6 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 47.6.  Hurricane Beryl was similar in size and intensity to Hurricane Michael when Michael hit Northwest Florida in 2018.

The eye of Hurricane Beryl moved over Carriacou Island earlier on Monday.  There were reports of significant damage on that island.  The core of Beryl’s circulation passed just to the north of Grenada.  A weather station at Maurice Bishop International airport in Grenada (TGPY) reported a sustained wind speed of 92 m.p.h. (148 km/h) and a wind gust of 120 m.p.h. (195 km/h).

Hurricane Beryl will move through an environment favorable for a powerful hurricane during the next 24 hours.  Beryl will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29°C.  It will move under the southern part of an upper level ridge over the tropical Atlantic Ocean and eastern Caribbean Sea.  The ridge will produce easterly winds that will blow toward the top of Beryl’s circulation.  The winds in the lower levels of the atmosphere are also blowing from the east and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Hurricane Beryl could intensify during the next 24 hours unless another Eyewall Replacement Cycle occurs.  The vertical wind shear is forecast to increase on Wednesday and Beryl is likely to weaken when the wind shear increases.

Hurricane Beryl will move around the southern side of a high pressure system over the western Atlantic Ocean.  The high pressure system will steer Beryl toward the west-northwest during the next 24 hours.  On its anticipated track, Hurricane Beryl will move toward Jamaica.  Beryl could reach Jamaica on Wednesday.  Hurricane Beryl will pass south of Puerto Rico on Tuesday morning.  Beryl will move south of Hispaniola later on Tuesday.

 

 

Hurricane Beryl Batters the Grenadine Islands

Hurricane Beryl battered the Grenadine Islands on Monday.  At 12:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Hurricane Beryl was located at latitude 12.5°N and longitude 61.5°W which put the center about 15 miles (25 km) west of Carriacou Island.  Beryl was moving toward the west-northwest at 20 m.p.h. (32 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 150 m.p.h. (240 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 180 m.p.h. (290 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 950 mb.

Hurricane Warnings were in effect for Barbados, Grenada, Tobago, and St. Vincent and the Grenadine Islands.

A Hurricane Watch was is in effect for Jamaica.

Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for St. Lucia, Martinique and Trinidad.

A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the south coast of the Dominican Republic from Punta Palenque to the border with Haiti.  A Tropical Storm Watch was also in effect for the south coast of Haiti from Anse d’Hainault to the border with the Dominican Republic.

Hurricane Beryl intensified rapidly after it completed an Eyewall Replacement Cycle early on Monday.  A circular eye with a diameter of 23 miles (37 km) was present at the center of Beryl’s circulation.  The eye was surrounded by a ring of thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hurricane Beryl.  Storms near the core generated strong upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the hurricane in all directions.  The removal of large amounts of mass caused the surface pressure to decrease rapidly.

Completion of the Eyewall Replacement Cycle caused the size of the circulation around Hurricane Beryl to increase.  Winds to hurricane force extended out 40 miles (65 km) from the center of Beryl’s circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 125 miles (200 km) from the center of Hurricane Beryl.

The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Hurricane Beryl was 31.6.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 12.5 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 44.1.  Hurricane Beryl was similar in intensity and just a little smaller than Hurricane Ida was when Ida hit Louisiana in 2021.

Hurricane Beryl will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours.  Beryl will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29°C.  It will move under the southern part of an upper level ridge over the tropical Atlantic Ocean and eastern Caribbean Sea.  The ridge will produce easterly winds that will blow toward the top of Beryl’s circulation.  The winds in the lower levels of the atmosphere are also blowing from the east and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Hurricane Beryl is likely to intensify during the next 24 hours unless another Eyewall Replacement Cycle occurs.  There is a chance that Hurricane Beryl could strengthen to a Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale.

Hurricane Beryl will move around the southern side of a high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean.  The high pressure system will steer Beryl toward the west-northwest during the next 24 hours.  On its anticipated track, Hurricane Beryl will move away from the Windward Islands during the next few hours.  Beryl will pass south of Puerto Rico on Tuesday.

The core of Hurricane Beryl is passing over the Grenadine Islands.  Beryl is capable of causing regional severe damage.  Widespread outages of electricity are likely.  Hurricane Beryl will also drop heavy rain.  Heavy rain is likely to cause flash floods in some locations.  Hurricane Beryl could cause a storm surge of up to 13 feet (4 meters) on the parts of islands where the wind blows the water toward the shore.

Hurricane Beryl will also bring strong winds and heavy rain in Grenada, St. Vincent, and St. Lucia, Tobago, and Martinique. Gusty winds and heavy rain could occur in Tobago and Martinique.  The wind speeds should diminish in Barbados and Trinidad as Hurricane Beryl moves farther away..

 

 

 

 

Philippe Weakens North of the Virgin Islands

Tropical Storm Philippe weakened north of the Virgin Islands on Tuesday. At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Storm Philippe was located at latitude 19.0°N and longitude 64.4°W which put it about 55 miles (90 km) northeast of St. Thomas. Philippe was moving toward the northwest at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 45 m.p.h. (75 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1004 mb.

A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the British Virgin Islands.

Tropical Storm Philippe weakened north of the Virgin Islands on Tuesday. An upper level ridge over the eastern Caribbean Sea produced strong westerly winds that blew across the top of Philippe’s circulation. Those winds caused strong vertical wind shear. The strong upper level winds blew the tops off of most of the thunderstorms in the southeastern part of Tropical Storm Philippe. Most of the bands revolving around the center of Philippe’s circulation consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 170 miles (275 km) in the eastern side of Philippe’s circulation. The winds in the western side of Tropical Storm Philippe were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Philippe will move through a region that will be unfavorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Philippe will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29°C. However, the upper level ridge over the eastern Caribbean Sea will continue to cause strong vertical wind shear. The wind shear will likely cause Tropical Storm Philippe to weaken more during the next 24 hours.

Tropical Storm Philippe will move around the southwestern part of a high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean. The high pressure system will steer Philippe toward the north-northwest during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track, Tropical Storm Philippe will move away from Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

Bands in the southeastern part of Tropical Storm Philippe did drop heavy rain over the Northern Leeward Islands during Monday night and Tuesday morning. Heavy rain fell on parts of Guadeloupe, Antigua, Barbuda, and Anguilla. There were reports of flash floods in some locations.

Hurricane Lee Moves Northeast of Puerto Rico

Hurricane Lee moved northeast of Puerto Rico on Sunday night. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Hurricane Lee was located at latitude 22.6°N and longitude 62.2°W which put it about 400 miles (645 km) northeast of the San Juan, Puerto Rico. Lee was moving toward the northwest at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 120 m.p.h. (195 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 140 m.p.h. (220 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 950 mb.

Hurricane Lee intensified on Sunday after it completed an eyewall replacement cycle. The inner eyewall dissipated on Sunday morning. The outer eyewall surrounded an eye with a diameter of 30 miles (50 km) developed at the center of Lee’s circulation. The strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms revolved around the core of Hurricane Lee. Storms near the core of Lee’s circulation generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the hurricane.

Hurricane Lee was turning into a large and powerful hurricane on Sunday night. Winds to hurricane force extended out 75 miles (120 km) from the center of Lee’s circulation. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 175 miles (280 km) from the center of circulation. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) was 22.1. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 22.6 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 44.7.

Hurricane Lee will move through an environment that will be favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Lee will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29°C. It will move into a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear. Hurricane Lee could intensify to Category 4 on the Saffir-Simpson Scale on Monday.

Hurricane Lee will move around the southwestern part of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean. The high pressure system will steer Lee toward the northwest during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track, Hurricane Lee will pass far to the north of the Puerto Rico on Tuesday.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, Tropical Storm Margot continued to intensify gradually over the Central Atlantic Ocean. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Tropical Storm Margot was located at latitude 24.6°N and longitude 39.9°W which put it about 1185 miles (1910 km) west-northwest of the Cabo Verde Islands. Margot was moving toward the north at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 996 mb.

Hurricane Lee Moves Northeast of the Leeward Islands

Hurricane Lee moved northeast of the Leeward Islands on Saturday night. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Hurricane Lee was located at latitude 21.0°N and longitude 59.9°W which put it about 285 miles (455 km) northeast of the Northern Leeward Islands. Lee was moving toward the west-northwest at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 105 m.p.h. (165 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 125 m.p.h. (200 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 962 mb.

Hurricane Lee was in the middle of an eyewall replacement cycle on Saturday evening. A small eye was at the center of Lee’s circulation. The small eye was surrounded by a tight ring of thunderstorms. The strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. A second eyewall surrounded the small eye and inner eyewall. The eyewall replacement cycle and some vertical wind shear caused Hurricane Lee to weaken on Saturday. Bands of showers and thunderstorms revolved around the two concentric eyewalls. Storms near the center of Lee’s circulation generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the hurricane.

The eyewall replacement cycle caused the size of Hurricane Lee’s circulation to increase. Winds to hurricane force extended out 35 miles (55 km) from the center of Lee’s circulation. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 185 miles (295 km) from the center of circulation. The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) was 17.8. The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 13.6 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 31.4.

Hurricane Lee will move through an environment that will become more favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Lee will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29°C. It will move into a region where the upper level winds are weaker and there will be less vertical wind shear. Hurricane Lee is likely to weaken on Sunday until the eyewall replacement cycle is completed, even though Lee will move into a more favorable environment. After the inner eyewall dissipates, low level convergence will increase into the larger outer eyewall. When the low level convergence becomes more concentrated in the outer eyewall, then Hurricane Lee could start to intensify again.

Hurricane Lee will move around the southern side of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean. The high pressure system will steer Lee toward the west-northwest during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track, Hurricane Lee could be north of the Puerto Rico by early next week.

Elsewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, Tropical Storm Margot gradually intensified west-northwest of the Cabo Verde Islands. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Margot was located at latitude 21.6°N and longitude 39.1°W which put it about 1060 miles (1705 km) west-northwest of the Cabo Verde Islands. Margot was moving toward the northwest at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1000 mb.

Hurricane Fiona Hits Eastern Dominican Republic

Hurricane Fiona hit the eastern Dominican Republic on Monday morning. At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Monday the center of Hurricane Fiona was located at latitude 18.8°N and longitude 69.0°W which put it about 45 miles (75 km) southeast of Samana, Dominican Republic. Fiona was moving toward the northwest at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 90 m.p.h. (145 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 105 m.p.h. (165 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 977 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Cabo Caucedo to Cabo Frances Viejo, Domincan Republic. A Hurricane Warning was also in effect for the Turks and Caicos. A Hurricane Watch was also in effect for the portion of the coast from Cabo Frances Viejo to Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic. Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for Puerto Rico, Culebra and Vieques. Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the portion of the coast from Cabo Frances Viejo to Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic. Tropical Storm Warnings were also in effect for the Southeastern Bahamas including the Acklins, Crooked Island, Long Cay, the Inaguas, Mayaguana and the Ragged Islands. A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Cabo Caucedo to Barahona, Dominican Republic.

The eye of Hurricane Fiona made landfall on the east coast of the Dominican Republic south-southwest of Punta Cana on Monday morning. Fiona continued to intensify until the eye made landfall. The eye had a diameter of 18 miles (30 km). A ring of strong thunderstorms surrounded the eye and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hurricane Fiona. Storms near the core generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the hurricane. Winds to hurricane force extended out 30 miles (50 km) from the center of Fiona. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 150 miles (240 km) from the center of circulation.

Hurricane Fiona is likely to weaken during the next few hours while the eye is over the eastern Dominican Republic. Fiona will move through an environment mostly favorable for intensification after it moves north of the Dominican Republic. Fiona will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear. Hurricane Fiona could rapidly intensify to a major hurricane after it moves north of the Dominican Republic.

Hurricane Fiona will move around the western side of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean. The high pressure system will steer Fiona toward the northwest during the next 24 hours. Hurricane Fiona will move toward the north when it reaches the western end of the high pressure system. On its anticipated track Hurricane Fiona will move across the eastern Dominican Republic during the next few hours. Fiona will bring strong gusty winds and locally heavy rain to the eastern Dominican Republic. Heavy rain is likely to cause flash floods in some locations. Bands in the eastern side of Fiona’s circulation will continue to drop locally heavy rain on Puerto Rico on Monday. Flood Warnings are in effect for parts of Puerto Rico. Hurricane Fiona will be east of the Turks and Caicos on Tuesday. Fiona could be near Bermuda on Thursday night.

Hurricane Fiona Drops Heavy Rain on Puerto Rico

Hurricane Fiona dropped heavy rain on Puerto Rico on Sunday and there were numerous reports of floods. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Hurricane Fiona was located at latitude 18.0°N and longitude 68.1°W which put it about 45 miles (75 km) south-southeast of Punta Cana, Dominican Republic. Fiona was moving toward the west-northwest at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 85 m.p.h. (135 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 982 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for Puerto Rico, Culebra and Vieques. A Hurricane Warning was also in effect for the portion of the coast from Cabo Caucedo to Cabo Frances Viejo, Domincan Republic. A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the Turks and Caicos. A Hurricane Watch was also in effect for the portion of the coast from Cabo Frances Viejo to Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic. Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the portion of the coast from Cabo Frances Viejo to Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic. Tropical Storm Warnings were also in effect for the Southeastern Bahamas including the Acklins, Crooked Island, Long Cay, the Inaguas, Mayaguana and the Ragged Islands. A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Cabo Caucedo to Barahona, Dominican Republic.

The eye of Hurricane Fiona was over the Mona Passage between Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic on Sunday night. The eye passed over the southwestern tip of Puerto Rico on Sunday afternoon. Heavy rain fell over much of Puerto Rico and there were many reports of flash floods. There were also reports of wind damage in parts of Puerto Rico and electricity was unavailable in most places.

Hurricane Fiona was strengthening gradually on Sunday night. An eye with a diameter of 12 miles (19 km) was at the center of Fiona. The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hurricane Fiona. Storms near the core generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the hurricane. Winds to hurricane force extended out 30 miles (50 km) from the center of Fiona. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 140 miles (220 km) from the center of circulation.

Hurricane Fiona will move through an environment mostly favorable for intensification during the next 48 hours. Fiona will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear. The center of Hurricane Fiona could pass over eastern Dominican Republic on Monday. Since some of the circulation around Hurricane Fiona will pass over land, that could cause Fiona to weaken when the center is near land. Fiona will be in an environment very favorable for intensification when it moves north of the Dominican Republic. It could rapidly intensify to a major hurricane early next week.

Hurricane Fiona will move around the western side of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean. The high pressure system will steer Fiona toward the northwest during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track the center of Hurricane Fiona could make landfall in the eastern Dominican Republic near Punta Cana on Monday morning. Bands in the eastern side of Fiona’s circulation will continue to drop locally heavy rain on Puerto Rico on Monday. Hurricane Fiona will also bring strong winds and locally heavy rain to the eastern part of the Dominican Republic early on Monday.

Fiona Intensifies to a Hurricane South of Puerto Rico

Former Tropical Storm Fiona intensified to a hurricane south of Puerto Rico on Sunday morning. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Hurricane Fiona was located at latitude 17.3°N and longitude 66.5°W which put it about 50 miles (80 km) south of Ponce, Puerto Rico. Fiona was moving toward the west-northwest at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 80 m.p.h. (130 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 95 m.p.h. (145 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 987 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for Puerto Rico, Culebra and Vieques. A Hurricane Warning was also in effect for the portion of the coast from Cabo Caucedo to Cabo Frances Viejo, Domincan Republic. A Hurricane Watch was also in effect for the portion of the coast from Cabo Frances Viejo to Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic. Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the U.S. Virgin Islands, the British Virgin Islands, and the portion of the coast from Cabo Frances Viejo to Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic. A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Cabo Caucedo to Barahona, Dominican Republic. Tropical Storm Watches were in effect for the Turks and Caicos, and for the Southeastern Bahamas including the Acklins, Crooked Island, Long Cay, the Inaguas, Mayaguana and the Ragged Islands.

Former Tropical Storm Fiona strengthened to a hurricane over the Caribbean Sea south of Puerto Rico. The inner end of a rainband wrapped around the northern side of the center of Hurricane Fiona. A partial eyewall surrounded the northern half of the center of Fiona’s circulation. The partial eyewall was over Ponce, Puerto Rico. Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hurricane Fiona. Storms near the core generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the hurricane. Winds to hurricane force extended out 30 miles (50 km) in the northeastern quadrant of Fiona’s circulation. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 140 miles (220 km) from the center of circulation.

Hurricane Fiona will move through an environment mostly favorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. Fiona will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear. The center of Hurricane Fiona could pass over southwestern Puerto Rico during the next few hours. Fiona will move near the eastern part of the Dominican Republic on Monday. Since some of the circulation around Hurricane Fiona will pass over land during the next 36 hours, that could cause Fiona to weaken when the center is over or near land.

Hurricane Fiona will move around the western side of a subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean. The high pressure system will steer Fiona toward the northwest during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track the center of Hurricane Fiona will be near the southwestern part of Puerto Rico by Sunday evening. Bands in the eastern and northern sides of Fiona’s circulation will bring strong winds and locally heavy rain to Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and the British Virgin Islands on Sunday. Hurricane Fiona could begin to affect the eastern part of the Dominican Republic during Sunday night.

Tropical Storm Fiona Moves Closer to Puerto Rico

Tropical Storm Fiona moved closer to Puerto Rico on Saturday night. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Fiona was located at latitude 16.6°N and longitude 64.9°W which put it about 75 miles (120 km) south of St. Croix. Fiona was moving toward the west-northwest at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 997 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for Puerto Rico, Culebra and Vieques. A Hurricane Warning was also in effect for the portion of the coast from Cabo Caucedo to Cabo Frances Viejo, Domincan Republic. A Hurricane Watch was in effect for the U.S. Virgin Islands. A Hurricane Watch was also in effect for the portion of the coast from Cabo Frances Viejo to Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic. Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the U.S. Virgin Islands, the British Virgin Islands, and the portion of the coast from Cabo Frances Viejo to Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic. A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Cabo Caucedo to Barahona, Dominican Republic.

Tropical Storm Fiona was gradually getting better organized on Saturday night. The inner end of a rainband wrapped around the northern side of the center of circulation. Radar on Puerto Rico showed that an eye could be forming at the center of Fiona’s circulation. Storms near the center generated more upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the tropical storm. The removal of mass was allowing the surface pressure to slowly decrease. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 140 miles (220 km) from the center of Tropical Storm Fiona.

Tropical Storm Fiona will move through an environment somewhat favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Fiona will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. An upper level ridge over the tropical Atlantic Ocean will produce southwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of Tropical Storm Fiona. Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear. The wind shear will inhibit intensification. Tropical Storm Fiona could continue to strengthen gradually, but the wind shear will likely limit intensification during the next 24 hours.

Tropical Storm Fiona will move around the southwestern side of the subtropical high pressure system over the Atlantic Ocean. The high pressure system will steer Fiona toward the west-northwest during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track the center of Tropical Storm Fiona will be near the southwestern part of Puerto Rico by Sunday evening. Bands in the eastern and northern sides of Fiona’s circulation will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and the British Virgin Islands on Sunday. Fiona could begin to affect the eastern part of the Dominican Republic during Sunday night.