Tag Archives: Costa Rica

Tropical Storm Bonnie Moves over Eastern North Pacific

Tropical Storm Bonnie moved over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean on Saturday. At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Bonnie was located at latitude 11.3°N and longitude 88.0°W which put it about 130 miles (210 km) west-southwest of Managua, Nicaragua. Bonnie was moving toward the west at 16 m.p.h. (26 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1000 mb.

Tropical Storm Bonnie moved across Central America and over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean on Saturday. The center of Bonnie’s circulation moved along the border between Nicaragua and Costa Rica. Bonnie dropped heavy rain on parts of Nicaragua and Costa Rica. It took about 12 hours for Tropical Storm Bonnie to cross Central America. Bonnie’s circulation was intact when it emerged over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean. The inner end of a rainband wrapped around the center of Tropical Storm Bonnie and an eye was visible on conventional and microwave satellite images. A ring of strong thunderstorms surrounded the eye and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Storms near the center of circulation generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the tropical storm. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 70 miles (110 km) from the center of Bonnie.

Tropical Storm Bonnie will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. Bonnie will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28˚C. It will move under an upper level ridge over Central America and the Eastern North Pacific Ocean. The upper level winds are weak in the ridge and there will be little vertical wind shear. Tropical Storm Bonnie will intensify during the next 36 hours. Bonnie is likely to strengthen to a hurricane by Sunday night. A period of rapid intensification could occur. Bonnie could intensify to a major hurricane early next week.

Tropical Storm Bonnie will move south of a high pressure system over Mexico. The high pressure system will steer Bonnie toward the west-northwest during the next 36 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Bonnie will remain south of El Salvador and Guatemala.

Tropical Storm Colin Forms on South Carolina Coast

Tropical Storm Colin formed on the coast of South Carolina on Saturday morning. At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Colin was located at latitude 33.6°N and longitude 79.3°W which put it about 25 miles (40 km) west-southwest of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Colin was moving toward the northeast at 8 m.p.h. (13 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1012 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from South Santee River, South Carolina to Duck, North Carolina.

A small low pressure system dropped heavy rain over the area around Charleston, South Carolina on Friday. An area of winds to tropical storm force was detected off the coast of South Carolina on Saturday morning and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Storm Colin. The strongest winds were occurring in bands in the eastern side of Tropical Storm Colin, which was over the Atlantic Ocean. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 70 miles (110 km) in the eastern side of Colin’s circulation. The winds over land were weaker. The heaviest rain was also falling in the bands over the Atlantic Ocean.

Tropical Storm Colin will move through an environment that is unfavorable for intensification during the next 36 hours. Although the Sea Surface Temperatures off the coast of North Carolina are near 27˚C, the center of Colin’s circulation is likely to move along the coast. An upper level trough over the eastern U.S. will produce southwesterly winds that will cause moderate vertical wind shear. Proximity to land and vertical wind shear are likely to prevent Tropical Storm Colin from strengthening during the next 36 hours.

The upper level trough will steer Tropical Storm Colin toward the northeast during the next 36 hours. On its anticipated track, the center of Tropical Storm Colin will move along the coast of North Carolina. Colin could bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to the coast of North Carolina.

Elsewhere, Tropical Storm Bonnie was moving along the border between Nicaragua and Costa Rica. At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Bonnie was located at latitude 11.2°N and longitude 85.8°W which put it about 65 miles (105 km) southeast of Managua, Nicaragua. Bonnie was moving toward the west at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb. Tropical Storm Bonnie will move over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean in a few hours.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the Caribbean coast from Limon, Costa Rica to Sandy Bay Sirpi, Nicaragua. A Tropical Storm Warning was also in effect for the portion of the Pacific coast from Cabo Blanco, Costa Rica to the border between Nicaragua and Honduras.

Tropical Storm Bonnie Hits Nicaragua and Costa Rica

Tropical Storm Bonnie hit southern Nicaragua and northern Costa Rica on Friday night. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Bonnie was located at latitude 10.9°N and longitude 83.8°W which put it about 75 miles (120 km) south of Bluefields, Nicaragua. Bonnie was moving toward the west at 16 m.p.h. (26 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 995 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the Caribbean coast from Limon, Costa Rica to Sandy Bay Sirpi, Nicaragua. A Tropical Storm Warning was also in effect for the portion of the Pacific coast from Cabo Blanco, Costa Rica to the border between Nicaragua and Honduras.

The center of Tropical Storm Bonnie made landfall on the Caribbean coast near the border between Nicaragua and Costa Rica on Friday night. Bonnie was beginning to strengthen rapidly just prior to landfall. A reconnaissance plane reported an eye with a diameter of 12 miles (19 km) had developed at the center of Tropical Storm Bonnie. The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 115 miles (185 km) on the northern side of Bonnie’s circulation. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 20 miles (30 km) on the southern side of Tropical Storm Bonnie.

Tropical Storm Bonnie will move south of the western part of a high pressure system over the western Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea. The high pressure system will steer Bonnie toward the west during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Bonnie will move along the border between Nicaragua and Costa Rica. Bonnie will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to southern Nicaragua and northern Costa Rica. Heavy rain could cause flash floods and mudslides in some locations. Bonnie will move over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean on Saturday.

Tropical Storm Bonnie will weaken while it moves over land. Mountains are likely to disrupt the low level circulation and to cause the developing eye and eyewall to dissipate. Bonnie will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28˚C when it moves over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean. Bonnie is forecast to strengthen back to a tropical storm when it moves over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean and it could intensify to a hurricane in a couple of days.

Tropical Storm Bonnie Forms over Southwest Caribbean Sea

Tropical Storm Bonnie formed over the Southwestern Caribbean Sea on Friday morning. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Bonnie was located at latitude 11.2°N and longitude 81.9°W which put it about 195 miles (315 km) east-southeast of Bluefields, Nicaragua. Bonnie was moving toward the west at 20 m.p.h. (32 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1005 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for San Andres Island, Colombia. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the Caribbean coast from Limon, Costa Rica to Sandy Bay Sirpi, Nicaragua. A Tropical Storm Warning was also in effect for the portion of the Pacific coast from Cabo Blanco, Costa Rica to the border between Nicaragua and Honduras.

A U.S. Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter reconnaissance aircraft found westerly winds in the southwestern part of former Potential Tropical Cyclone Two on Friday morning. Based on data from the reconnaissance plane, the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Storm Bonnie. More thunderstorms formed in bands revolving around the center of Tropical Storm Bonnie. Storms near the center of Bonnie generated upper level divergence that pumped mass away from the tropical storm. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 100 miles (160 km) in the northern side of Bonnie’s circulation. Winds in the southern side of Tropical Storm Bonnie were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Bonnie will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 12 hours. Bonnie will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28˚C. It will be under an upper level ridge over the Southwestern Caribbean Sea. The upper level winds are weak in the ridge and there will be little vertical wind shear. Tropical Storm Bonnie will strengthen during the next 12 hours. Bonnie will weaken when it moves over Nicaragua and Costa Rica, but it could strengthen again over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean on Saturday.

Tropical Storm Bonnie will move south of the western part of a high pressure system over the western Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea. The high pressure system will steer Bonnie toward the west during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Bonnie will hit southern Nicaragua and northern Costa Rica on Friday night. Bonnie will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to southern Nicaragua and northern Costa Rica. Heavy rain could cause flash floods and mudslides in some locations.

Potential Tropical Cyclone Two Moves Toward Nicaragua

Potential Tropical Cyclone Two moved over the Southwestern Caribbean Sea toward Nicaragua on Thursday night. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Potential Tropical Cyclone Two was located at latitude 11.8°N and longitude 77.7°W which put it about 410 miles (665 km) east of Bluefields, Nicaragua. Potential Tropical Cyclone Two was moving toward the west at 21 m.p.h. (33 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1005 mb.

A Hurricane Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Laguna de Perlas, Nicaragua to the border with Costa Rica. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for San Andres Island, Colombia. A Tropical Storm Warning was also in effect for the portion of the coast from Limon, Costa Rica to Sandy Bay Sirpi, Nicaragua. A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the Pacific Coast from Cabo Blanco, Costa Rica to Puerto Sandino, Nicaragua.

Potential Tropical Cyclone Two exhibited more organization on Thursday night. More thunderstorms developed near the center of circulation. A reconnaissance aircraft found that the surface pressure had decreased slightly. However, there were still parts of the circulation that consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. The strongest winds were occurring in the northern half of the circulation. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 80 miles (130 km) on the northern side of Potential Tropical Cyclone Two. The winds in the southern half of the circulation were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Potential Tropical Cyclone Two will move through an environment favorable for the development of a tropical cyclone during the next 24 hours. It will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 28˚C. Potential Tropical Cyclone Two will move under an upper level ridge over the Southwestern Caribbean Sea. The upper level winds are weak in the ridge and there will be little vertical wind shear. Potential Tropical Cyclone Two could develop into a tropical storm on Friday.

Potential Tropical Cyclone Two will move south of the western part of a high pressure system over the western Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea. The high pressure system will steer Potential Tropical Cyclone Two toward the west during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track Potential Tropical Cyclone Two will begin to affect southern Nicaragua and northern Costa Rica on Friday evening. It could be a tropical storm when it approaches the coast. It will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to southern Nicaragua and northern Costa Rica. Heavy rain could cause flash floods in some locations.

Possible Development over Southwest Caribbean Sea

A tropical depression or tropical storm could develop over the Southwestern Caribbean Sea east of Nicaragua during the next few days. An area of low pressure at the surface, currently designated as Invest 93L, is over that area. At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Invest 93L was located at latitude 11.8°N and longitude 82.2°W which put it about 110 miles (175 km) east of Bluefields, Nicaragua. Invest 93L was moving toward the west-northwest at 6 m.p.h. (10 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 25 m.p.h. (40 km/h) and and there were wind gusts to 35 m.p.h. (55 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1009 mb.

Invest 93L was located on the eastern side of a larger area of low pressure that extends from the Southwestern Caribbean Sea across Central America to the Eastern North Pacific Ocean. A second, small low pressure system, currently designated as Invest 93E, was located over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean south of El Salvador. Visible satellite images appeared to show some counterclockwise rotation of lower clouds over the Southwestern Caribbean Sea east of Nicaragua. A few thunderstorms formed near the apparent center of circulation, but the system did not possess enough organization to be classified as a tropical depression.

Invest 93L will be in an environment that is somewhat favorable for the formation of a tropical cyclone during the next few days. Invest 93L will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 29˚C. It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear. If Invest 93L remains over the Southwest Caribbean Sea, it could develop into a tropical depression during the next 48 hours. However, if the center of Invest 93L moves inland over Nicaragua, then it will not develop. The National Hurricane Center is indicating there is a probability of 40% that Invest 93L develops into a tropical cyclone. A reconnaissance plane has been tentatively tasked to investigate Invest 93L on Wednesday afternoon, if necessary.

Invest 93L will move near the southwestern part of a high pressure system that extends from the Western Atlantic Ocean over the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico. The steering winds are weak near the southwestern part of the high pressure system, but those winds could steer Invest 93L slowly toward the northwest during the next few days. On its anticipated track, Invest 93L will move close to the coast of Nicaragua. Invest 93L could drop heavy rain over parts of Nicaragua, Honduras, Costa Rica and El Salvador. Locally heavy rain could cause flash floods in some places.

Tropical Storm Eta Drops Heavy Rain on Nicaragua and Honduras

Tropical Storm Eta dropped heavy rain on Nicaragua and Honduras on Wednesday afternoon. At 4:00 p.m. EST on Wednesday the center of Tropical Storm Eta was located at latitude 13.9°N and longitude 85.7°W which put it about 100 miles (160 km) east of Tegucigalpa, Honduras. Eta was moving toward the west at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 999 mb.

The wind speeds in former Hurricane Eta decreased steadily on Wednesday as it move farther inland over northern Nicaragua. Eta weakened to a tropical storm, but the storm continued to drop heavy rain over parts of northern Nicaragua and Honduras. There were reports of flash floods in a number of locations. Thunderstorms in bands on the western and northern periphery of Tropical Storm Eta also dropped heavy rain over parts of Belize, Guatemala and Costa Rica. A strong rainband was also over the Caribbean Sea just east of Nicaragua.

Tropical Storm Eta will likely weaken to a tropical depression during Wednesday night. However, Eta will continue to drop locally heavy rain and more flash floods are likely to occur. Tropical Storm Eta will move around the southwestern part of a ridge of high pressure on Thursday. The high will steer Eta toward the west-northwest on Thursday. On its anticipated track Eta will move across Honduras to near the coast of Belize.

A upper level trough east of the Rocky Mountains is forecast to move southeast toward the Gulf of Mexico during the next several days. The southern end of the end of the trough will make a transition into a cutoff low. Counterclockwise circulation around the cutoff low will pull Eta toward the northeast on Friday. When Eta moves over the northwestern Caribbean Sea it will be in an environment somewhat favorable for intensification. Eta will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 29°C. The upper level trough will produce southwesterly winds which will blow toward the top of Eta’s circulation. Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear, but the shear may not be strong enough to prevent intensification. Eta could strengthen back into a tropical storm on Friday night. It is possible that Eta could develop the structure of a subtropical storm if the cutoff low causes enough wind shear to keep it from becoming a tropical storm again.

The counterclockwise rotation around the cutoff low will pull Eta more toward the north during the weekend. Eta is likely to move across Cuba and it could drop heavy rain when it does so. Eta will approach the Florida Keys on Sunday and it could bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to the Keys and South Florida.

Tropical Storm Adrian Develops South of Guatemala

Tropical Storm Adrian developed south of Guatemala on Tuesday.  Adrian became the earliest tropical storm to form over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean during the satellite era.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday the center of Tropical Storm Adrian was located at latitude 9.5°N and longitude 92.3°W which put it about 360 miles (575 km) southwest of San Salvador, El Salvador.  Adrian was moving toward the west-northwest at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1005 mb.

A well defined low level center of circulation developed within a large area of thunderstorms over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean on Tuesday and the National Hurricane Center classified the system as Tropical Storm Adrian.  A primary rainband wrapped about half way around the western side of the center of circulation.  Additional bands of showers and thunderstorms formed farther away from the center.  There were more thunderstorms west of the center, but bands were forming in all quadrants of Tropical Storm Adrian.  The strongest winds were occurring close to the center of circulation, which is the typical structure of a tropical cyclone.  Thunderstorms near the core of Adrian were beginning to generate upper level divergence which was pumping away mass.

Tropical Storm Adrian will be moving through an environment that will be favorable for intensification.  Adrian will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature will be about 30.5°C.  An upper level ridge east of Adrian is producing southeasterly winds which are blowing toward the top of the circulation.  Those winds are causing some vertical wind shear, but the shear should not be great enough to prevent intensification.  Tropical Storm Adrian is likely to intensify during the next several days and it could become a hurricane later this week.

Adrian is moving around the southwestern part of a subtropical ridge, which is steering the tropical storm toward the west-northwest.  A general west-northwesterly motion is expected to continue for several more days.  When Adrian reaches the western end of the ridge later this week, the tropical storm will turn toward the north and it will move closer toward the coast.

Possible Tropical Development South of El Salvador

A broad area of low pressure has formed over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean south of El Salvador.  The environment is favorable for the development of a tropical cyclone.  The National Hurricane Center (NHC) has designated the low pressure system as Invest 90E.  NHC is indicating that there is a 50% probability of the formation of a tropical depression during the next 48 hours and an 80% probability of formation during the next five days.

At 2:00 p.m. EDT on Monday the center of Invest 90E was located at latitude 7.9°N and longitude 89.5°W which put it about 370 miles (595 km) south of San Salvador, El Salvador.  Invest 90E was stationary.  The maximum sustained wind speed was 30 m.p.h. (50 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1008 mb.

More thunderstorms formed on Monday around a broad area of low pressure south of El Salvador.  Visible satellite imagery suggested a broad counterclockwise rotation of the area of thunderstorms, but there were no indications of a well developed core of the circulation.  Several smaller centers of rotation were visible within the broad low pressure system, but these may be transient features.  The broad area of thunderstorms was producing upper level divergence.  The divergence is pumping out mass and if that continues, then the surface pressure will decrease.

The area of low pressure is in an environment favorable for tropical development.  It is moving over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  The low is sitting underneath an upper level ridge and the winds in the upper level are weak.  There is little vertical wind shear and there is nothing to inhibit upper level divergence.  The circulation should continue to organize, which is why the probability of formation of a tropical cyclone is high.

The area of low pressure is in an area where the steering currents are weak and Invest 90E was nearly stationary on Monday.  A high pressure system northeast of the broad area of low pressure system is expected to strengthen.  When that happens, the high is likely to steer the area of low pressure toward the northwest.

Tropical Storm Otto Crosses Into the Eastern North Pacific Ocean

Tropical Storm Otto moved steadily along the border between Nicaragua and Costa Rica and crossed into the eastern North Pacific Ocean on Thursday night.  At 10:00 p.m. EST on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Otto was located at latitude 10.9°N and longitude 85.6°W which put it about 20 miles (30 km) north of Liberia, Costa Rica.  Otto was moving toward the west at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 70 m.p.h. (110 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 85 m.p.h. (140 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 990 mb.

The structure of Tropical Storm Otto remained intact as it crossed from the southwestern Caribbean Sea to the eastern North Pacific Ocean.  Radar images from Nicaragua and infrared satellite images both showed that the eye continued to exist.  A ring of strong thunderstorms still surrounds the eye and those storms are generating upper level divergence.

Tropical Storm Otto will be moving through an environment favorable for intensification.  It will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 28°C on Friday, and it will move over warmer water during the weekend.  The upper level winds are weak and there is little vertical wind shear.  Tropical Storm Otto is likely to strengthen back into a hurricane once the entire circulation moves over the eastern North Pacific Ocean and a period of rapid intensification is possible.

A ridge north of Otto is steering the tropical storm toward the west and that general motion is expected to continue for several more days.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Otto is expected to move steadily away from the west coast of Nicaragua and Costa Rica.