Tag Archives: Corpus Christi

Tropical Storm Nicholas Nears Texas Coast

Tropical Storm Nicholas neared the coast of Texas on Monday morning. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Monday the center of Tropical Storm Nicholas was located at latitude 26.4°N and longitude 96.8°W which put it about 140 miles (225 km) south of Port O’Connor, Texas. Nicholas was moving toward the north at 12 m.p.h. (19km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were’ wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb.

A Hurricane Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Port Aransas to San Luis Pass, Texas. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from the Mouth of the Rio Grande River to Sabine Pass, Texas. The Tropical Storm Warning included Corpus Christi and Galveston.

The center of Tropical Storm Nicholas reorganized several times on Monday. Each time a new center formed farther to the north-northeast. The new centers formed on the southern sides of clusters of stronger thunderstorms. The inner end of a rainband appeared to be wrapping around the northern side of the most recent center of circulation. Other bands of stronger thunderstorms were occurring north and east of the center of Nicholas. Bands to the south and west of the center consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. The strongest winds were occurring in the eastern half of Tropical Storm Nicholas. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 115 miles (185 km) on the eastern side of Nicholas. The winds in the western half of the circulation were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Nicholas will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 12 hours. Nicholas will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 30˚C. It will move between and upper level trough over northern Mexico and an upper level ridge over the Gulf of Mexico. The upper trough and ridge will produce southerly winds that will blow toward the top of Nicholas’ circulation. Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear, but the shear will not be strong enough to prevent intensification. The upper level low will move west and weaken during the next 12 hours. The upper level ridge will extend northwest over Tropical Storm Nicholas. When the ridge extends over Nicholas the upper level winds will weaken. When the upper level winds weaken, the vertical wind shear will decrease. Tropical Storm Nicholas will strengthen when that occurs. If a more well defined center develops and persists in the middle of Nicholas, the it could strengthen more quickly. There is a chance that Nicholas could intensify to a hurricane later on Monday.

Tropical Storm Nicholas will move around the western side of a high pressure system that extends over the Gulf of Mexico. The high will steer Nicholas toward the north during the next 12 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Nicholas will approach the central coast of Texas on Monday night. Nicholas will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to coastal areas of northeast Texas on Monday night. The strongest winds and the heaviest rain will occur before the center of Tropical Storm Nicholas makes landfall. The strongest winds will occur on the eastern side of Nicholas’ circulation. Scattered power outages could occur along the Upper Texas Coast and in southwestern Louisiana. Tropical Storm Nicholas could also cause a storm surge of up to 7 feet (2 meters) along portions of the coast. Nicholas will move toward the northeast on Tuesday. Locally heavy rain will fall over Louisiana. Flash floods could occur in some locations.

Tropical Storm Nicholas Prompts Hurricane Watch for Texas

A potential threat posed by Tropical Storm Nicholas prompted the issuance of a Hurricane Watch for a portion of the Texas coast on Sunday. At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Tropical Storm Nicholas was located at latitude 22.5°N and longitude 95.5°W which put it about 260 miles (415 km) south-southeast of the Mouth of the Rio Grande River. Nicholas was moving toward the north at 2 m.p.h. (3 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were’ wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1007 mb.

A Hurricane Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Port Aransas to Freeport, Texas. A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Barra el Mezquital, Mexico to High Island Texas. The Tropical Storm Warning included Corpus Christi and Galveston. A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from High Island to Sabine Pass, Texas.

The circulation around Tropical Storm Nicholas was poorly organized. There was a broad center of circulation in the middle of Nicholas. Several smaller cyclonic circulations were revolving around inside the broad center. Many of the thunderstorms were occurring in bands in the northern half of Tropical Storm Nicholas. Bands in the southern half of Nicholas consisted primarily of showers and lower clouds. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 115 miles (185 km) in the northeastern quadrant of Tropical Storm Nicholas. The winds in the other parts of Nicholas’ circulation were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Nicholas will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Nicholas will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 30˚C. It will move between and upper level low over northern Mexico and an upper level ridge over the northwestern Caribbean Sea. The upper low and ridge will produce southerly winds that will blow toward the top of Nicholas’ circulation. Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear, but the shear will not be strong enough to prevent intensification. The upper level low will move west and weaken on Monday. The upper level ridge will extend west over Tropical Storm Nicholas. When the ridge extends over Nicholas the upper level winds will weaken. When the upper level winds weaken, the vertical wind shear will decrease. Tropical Storm Nicholas will strengthen when that occurs. If a more well defined center develops in the middle of Nicholas, the it could strengthen more quickly. There is a chance that Nicholas could intensify to a hurricane later on Monday.

Tropical Storm Nicholas will move around the western side of a high pressure system that extends over the Gulf of Mexico. The high will steer Nicholas toward the north-northwest during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Nicholas will approach the coast near the Mouth of the Rio Grande River on Monday. Nicholas will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to coastal areas of northern Mexico and east Texas on Monday. Tropical Storm Nicholas could also cause a storm surge of up to 7 feet (2 meters) along portions of the coast. It is possible that a new center of circulation could develop closer to the thunderstorms in the northern half of Tropical Storm Nicholas. If a new center develops farther to the north, that could increase the threat to northeastern Texas and western Louisiana.

Tropical Storm Nicholas Forms over Southwest Gulf of Mexico

Tropical Storm Nicholas formed over the southwestern Gulf of Mexico on Sunday morning. At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Sunday the center of Tropical Storm Nicholas was located at latitude 20.5°N and longitude 94.8°W which put it about 405 miles (645 km) south-southeast of the Mouth of the Rio Grande River. Nicholas was moving toward the north-northwest at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h). The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were’ wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h). The minimum surface pressure was 1008 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was issued for the portion of the coast from Barra el Mezquital, Mexico to Port Aransas, Texas. A Tropical Storm Watch was issued for the portion of the coast from Port Aransas to High Island, Texas.

An Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter reconnaissance plane found sustained winds of tropical storm force in a low pressure system over the southwestern Gulf of Mexico on Sunday morning and the National Hurricane Center designated the system as Tropical Storm Nicholas. The circulation around Tropical Storm Nicholas was still organizing. Thunderstorms began to form near the center of Nicholas. Thunderstorms were also developing in bands revolving around the center of circulation. Winds to tropical storm force extended out 100 miles (160 km) in the northeastern quadrant of Tropical Storm Nicholas. The winds in the other parts of the circulation were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Nicholas will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 24 hours. Nicholas will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperatures are near 30˚C. It will move between and upper level low over northern Mexico and an upper level ridge over the northwestern Caribbean Sea. The upper low and ridge will produce south-southwesterly winds that will blow toward the top of Nicholas’ circulation. Those winds will cause some vertical wind shear, but the shear will not be strong enough to prevent intensification. The upper level winds are forecast to weaken on Monday and Tropical Storm Nicholas could strengthen more quickly when that occurs. There is a chance that Nicholas could intensify to a hurricane on Monday.

Tropical Storm Nicholas will move around the western side of a high pressure system that extends over the Gulf of Mexico. The high will steer Nicholas toward the north-northwest during the next 24 hours. On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Nicholas will approach the coast near the Mouth of the Rio Grande River on Monday. Nicholas will bring gusty winds and locally heavy rain to coastal areas of northern Mexico and southern Texas on Monday. Tropical Storm Nicholas could also cause a storm surge of up to 7 feet (2 meters) along portions of the coast.

Tropical Storm Beta in Holding Pattern

Tropical Storm Beta was in a holding pattern on Saturday afternoon.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Tropical Storm Beta was located at latitude 26.6°N and longitude 92.4°which put it about 320 miles (510 km) east-southeast of Corpus Christi, Texas.  Beta was stationary.  The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 994 mb.

A Hurricane Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from Port Aransas to High Island, Texas.  A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Port Aransas to Intracoastal City, Louisiana.  Tropical Storm Watches were in effect for the portions of the coast from the Mouth of the Rio Grande River to Port Aransas and from Intracoastal City to Morgan City, Louisiana.

The intensity of Tropical Storm Beta held steady and it moved little on Saturday afternoon.  An upper level trough over Texas produced southwesterly winds which blew across the top of Tropical Storm Beta.  Those winds caused strong vertical wind shear and they blew the tops off thunderstorms near the center of Beta on Saturday morning.  The shear may have decreased later because new thunderstorms formed near the center of circulation on Saturday afternoon.  A reconnaissance flight found that the winds around Tropical Storm Beta had maintained their speed.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 175 miles (280 km) on the northern side of Beta.  Tropical storm force winds only extended out 50 miles (80 km) in the southern half of the circulation.

Tropical Storm Beta will move through an environment somewhat favorable for intensification during the next 36 hours.  Beta will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  The upper level trough over Texas is forecast to weaken and if that happens, then the vertical wind shear will decrease.  There is drier air over Texas and Tropical Storm Beta could pull some of that air into the southern part of the circulation.  Beta could strengthen on Sunday if the wind shear decreases.  However, if Tropical Storm Beta remains stationary for too long, its winds will mix cooler water to the surface, which would inhibit intensification.

A large cool high pressure system is over the eastern U.S.  The high blocked the northward movement of Beta, which is why the tropical storm became stationary.  The high pressure system will move slowly eastward during the next few days.  As the high moves east, it will steer Tropical Storm Beta slowly toward the west-northwest.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Beta could approach the Central Texas coast on Monday.  Beta could be a hurricane when it approaches the coast.

The figure below shows the factors affecting Tropical Storm Beta on Saturday afternoon.

Elsewhere, Hurricane Teddy continued to move in the direction of Bermuda.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Hurricane Teddy was located at latitude 26.7°N and longitude 60.2°W which put it about 475 miles (765 km) southeast of Bermuda.  Teddy was moving toward the northwest at 13 m.p.h. (20 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 120 m.p.h. (195 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 140 m.p.h. (220 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 958 mb.  A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for Bermuda.

Hanna Strengthens to a Hurricane Near South Texas

Former Tropical Storm Hanna strengthened into a hurricane near the coast of South Texas on Saturday morning.  At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Saturday the center of Hurricane Hanna was located at latitude 27.1°N and longitude 96.0°W which put it about 100 miles (160 km) east-southeast of Corpus Christi, Texas.  Hanna was moving toward the west at 9 m.p.h. (15 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 75 m.p.h. (120 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 90 m.p.h. (150 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 982 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from Port Mansfield to Mesquite Bay, Texas.  Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the portions of the coast from Barra de Mezquital, Mexico to Port Mansfield and from Mesquite Bay to High Island, Texas.

A NOAA aircraft detected winds to hurricane force in former Tropical Storm Hanna on Saturday morning and the National Hurricane Center upgraded Hanna to a hurricane.  The circulation around Hurricane Hanna was well organized.  A circular eye with a diameter of 25 miles (40 km) was at the center of circulation.  The eye was surrounded by a ring of strong thunderstorms and the strongest winds were occurring in that ring of storms.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the core of Hanna.  Storms near the core were generating upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the hurricane.  Winds to hurricane force extended out 25 miles (40 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 90 miles (150 km) from the center.

Hurricane Hanna will move through an environment favorable for strengthening during the next few hours.  Hanna will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Hurricane Hanna will continue to intensify until it makes landfall on the coast of South Texas.

Hurricane Hanna will move south of a high pressure system that stretches across the southern U.S.  The high will steer Hanna a little to the south of due west.  On its anticipated track the center of Hurricane Hanna will make landfall on Padre Island later today.  The northern part of the eyewall will pass near Corpus Christi and that city could experience winds to hurricane force.  The southern part of the eyewall will pass near Port Mansfield which could also experience hurricane force winds.  The core of Hanna will pass north of Brownsville, but Brownsville, Harlingen and Mcallen could all experience winds to tropical storm force.

Easterly winds will blow water toward the coast of South Texas and they will cause a significant storm surge.  The storm surge could reach 6 to 9 feet (2 to 3 meters) near and just to the north of where the center makes landfall.  Hurricane Hanna will also drop heavy rain over South Texas.  Isolated locations could receive over a foot (0.3 meters) of rain and flash flooding is likely.

Elsewhere, Tropical Storm Gonazalo was quickly nearing Trinidad.  At 8:00 a.m. EDT on Saturday  the center of Tropical Storm Gonzalo was located at latitude 10.3°N and longitude 59.8°W which put it about 100 miles (160 km) east of Trinidad.  Gonzalo was moving toward the west at 18 m.p.h. (30 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1009 mb.

Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect  for Tobago and Grenada.

Tropical Storm Hanna Prompts Hurricane Warning for Texas

A strengthening Tropical Storm Hanna prompted the issuance of a Hurricane Warning for a portion of the coast of Texas on Friday afternoon.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Hanna was located at latitude 27.3°N and longitude 94.3°W which put it about 195 miles (310 km) east of Corpus Christi, Texas.  Hanna was moving toward the west at 10 m.p.h. (16 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 65 m.p.h. (105 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 999 mb.

A Hurricane Warning was in effect for the portion of the Texas coast from Baffin Bay to Mesquite Bay.  Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for the portions of the coast from the Mouth of the Rio Grande River to Baffin Bay and from Mesquite Bay to San Luis Pass, Texas.

Tropical Storm Hanna exhibited much more organization on Friday afternoon.  A primary rainband wrapped around the southern and eastern sides of the center of Hanna.  The northern end of the rainband appeared to be wrapping around the rest of the center of circulation and an eye seemed to be forming.  Bands of showers and thunderstorms were revolving around the center of Tropical Storm Hanna.  Storms near the center were generating upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the tropical storm.  The removal of mass was allowing the surface pressure to decrease.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 60 miles (95 km) from the center for circulation.

Tropical Storm Hanna will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 18 hours.  Hanna will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Tropical Storm Hanna will continue to intensify.  If an eye and eyewall form completely, then Hanna could strengthen rapidly during the 6 to 12 hours prior to landfall.  Tropical Storm Hanna is very likely to intensify into a hurricane.

Tropical Storm Hanna will move south of a high pressure system that stretches across the southern U.S.  The high will steer Hanna toward the west during the next 24 hours.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Hanna will reach the coast of Texas near Corpus Christi during the middle of the day on Saturday.

Tropical Storm Hanna is very likely to be a hurricane when it makes landfall.  It will bring strong winds to the portion of the coast near where the eye makes landfall.  Strong winds blowing water toward the coast could create a storm surge of 6 to 8 feet (2 to 3 meters) near and to the north of where the eye makes landfall.

Elsewhere, a trade wind surge hit Tropical Storm Gonzalo from the northeast.  The surge caused increased low level wind shear and it brought drier air.  The increased shear and drier air caused Gonzalo to weaken.  At 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Tropical Storm Gonzalo was located at latitude 10.0°N and 55.6°W which put it about 390 miles (625 km) east of the southern Windward Islands.  Gonzalo was moving toward the west at 18 m.p.h. (30 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km.h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1008 mb.

Tropical Storm Warnings were in effect for Barbados, Tobago, Grenada, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

Tropical Depression Eight Strengthens to Tropical Storm Hanna

Former Tropical Depression Eight strengthened to Tropical Storm Hanna on Thursday night and a Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for a large portion of the coast of Texas.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Hanna was located at latitude 26.2°N and longitude 91.4°W which put it about 385 miles (620 km) east-southeast of Corpus Christi, Texas.  Hanna was moving toward the west-northwest at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 40 m.p.h. (65 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 50 m.p.h. (80 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1002 mb.

A Tropical Storm Warning was in effect for the portion of the coast from the Mouth of the Rio Grande River to San Luis Pass, Texas.  A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for the portion of the coast from San Luis Pass to High Island, Texas.

A NOAA aircraft detected winds to tropical storm force in former Tropical Depression Eight on Thursday night and the National Hurricane Center upgraded the system to Tropical Storm Hanna.  The surface pressure was decreasing and Tropical Storm Hanna was exhibiting greater organization.  A band of thunderstorms was wrapping around the southern and eastern sides of the center of circulation.  Thunderstorms were forming in other bands the were revolving around the center of circulation.  Storms near the center began to generate upper level divergence which was pumping mass away from the tropical storm.  The removal of mass allowed the surface pressure to decrease.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out 35 miles (55 km) from the center in the eastern quadrant of Tropical Storm Hanna.  Winds in the other parts of Hanna were blowing at less than tropical storm force.

Tropical Storm Hanna will move through an environment favorable for intensification during the next 36 hours.  Hanna will move over water where the Sea Surface Temperature is near 30°C.  It will move through a region where the upper level winds are weak and there will be little vertical wind shear.  Tropical Storm Hanna will continue to intensify and there is a chance it could strengthen into a hurricane.

Tropical Storm Hanna will move south of a high pressure system that extends from the Atlantic Ocean across the southern U.S.  The high will steer Hanna slowly toward the west.  On its anticipated track Tropical Storm Hanna will approach the coast of Texas near Corpus Christi on Saturday.  Hanna could be a strong tropical storm or a hurricane when it reaches the coast.

Elsewhere, Tropical Storm Gonzalo continued to churn toward the Windward Islands.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Thursday the center of Tropical Storm Gonzalo was located at latitude 9.9°N and longitude 50.6°W which put it about 730 miles (1170 km) east of the southern Windward Islands.  Gonzalo was moving toward the west at 14 m.p.h. (22 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 60 m.p.h. (95 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 75 m.p.h. (120km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 1000 mb.

A Hurricane Watch was in effect for Barbados and St. Vincent and the Grenadines.  A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for Tobago and Grenada.

Category 4 Hurricane Harvey Makes Landfall in Texas

Category 4 Hurricane Harvey made landfall near Rockport, Texas on Friday night.  Harvey was the first Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale to officially make landfall in Texas since Hurricane Carla in 1961.  Harvey was the first Category 4 hurricane to officially make landfall in the U.S. since Hurricane Charley in 2004.  At 11:00 p.m. EDT on Friday the center of Hurricane Harvey was located at latitude 28.0°N and longitude 97.0°W which put it about 30 miles (50 km) east-northeast of Corpus Christi, Texas.  Harvey was moving toward the northwest at 7 m.p.h. (11 km/h).  The maximum sustained wind speed was 130 m.p.h. (215 km/h) and there were wind gusts to 150 m.p.h. (240 km/h).  The minimum surface pressure was 938 mb.

The center of the eye of Hurricane Harvey moved across San Jose Island and it officially made landfall near Rockport, Texas.  The powerful western side of the eyewall moved over Corpus Christi Bay, Port Aransas, Ingleside and Rockport.  Those areas experienced winds of over 100 m.p.h. (160 km/h).  The eye was over Aransas Bay and the winds were weaker in Rockport.  The wind speeds will increase again when the eastern part of the eyewall reaches those locations.  Bands of winds to tropical storm force were revolving inland outside the core of Hurricane Harvey.  Winds to hurricane force extended out about 40 miles (65 km) from the center of circulation.  Winds to tropical storm force extended out about 140 miles (225 km) from the center.

The Hurricane Intensity Index (HII) for Hurricane Harvey at landfall was 25.1.  The Hurricane Size Index (HSI) was 11.9 and the Hurricane Wind Intensity Size Index (HWISI) was 37.0.  The indices indicate that Hurricane Harvey is capable of producing regional extensive damage. In terms of wind speed and size Hurricane Harvey is similar to Hurricane Charley.  The HII for Charley when in made landfall in southwest Florida in 2004 was 29.9.  The HSI was 8.1 and the HWISI for Charley was 38.0.  Harvey is not quite as strong as Charley was, but Harvey is a little larger.  So, Hurricane Harvey has approximately the same potential to cause damage that Hurricane Charley had.

Hurricane Harvey completed an eyewall replacement cycle a few hours before it made landfall.  the timing of the eyewall replacement cycle meant that Hurricane Harvey had time to intensify to Category 4 before it reached the Texas coast.  The eye contracted and the wind speed increased right up until Hurricane Harvey made landfall.  Hurricane Harvey was at its maximum intensity when it made landfall.

Hurricane Harvey slowed down as it reached the coast and areas near the core of the hurricane are experiencing prolonged periods of high wind speeds.  The prolonged period of high winds will increase the damage caused by those winds.  The winds north of the center of circulation are driving the water toward the coast and a storm surge of 12 feet (4 meters) is possible in some locations.  Hurricane Harvey could stall or make a slow loop during the next several days.  In either case, Hurricane Harvey will drop very heavy rain in some places and fresh water flooding is a serious risk.